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How can I call parents constructor ?

module C
    attr_accessor :c, :cc
    def initialization c, cc
        @c, @cc = c, cc
    end 
end

class B
    attr_accessor :b, :bb
    def initialization b, bb
        @b, @bb = b, bb
    end 
end


class A < B
    include C
    attr_accessor :a, :aa
    def initialization (a, b, c, aa, bb, cc)
        #call B::initialization - ?
        #call C::initialization - ?
        @a, @aa = a, aa
    end
end

Thanks.

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Is it idiomatic for a module to have an initialize method? –  Andrew Grimm Apr 17 '11 at 23:16
1  
@Andrew Grimm, probably, no. You are right. I was just starting ruby in April 2010 ;) –  Stas Kurilin Apr 18 '11 at 6:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

First, your method should be initialize, not initialization. Then, you can use super to call the parent class method. As for calling C's initializer in A, for clarity, I'd recommend splitting the initialization stuff into a different function, then just calling that function directly. It's easy to implement, and clearer.

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3  
i know you got the answer right by saying you use super, but for someone that is super new to ruby I just did not know until i looked at lower examples. –  WojonsTech Sep 17 '12 at 9:18
    
Code examples are always more helpful. –  alex0112 Sep 11 at 23:13

Ruby doesn't have constructors, therefore it's obviously not possible to call them, parent or otherwise. Ruby does have methods, however, and in order to call the parent's method with the same name as the currently executing method, you can use the super keyword. [Note: super without arguments is a shortcut for passing the same arguments that were passed into the currently executing method. If you actually want to pass no arguments, you have to do so explicitly: super().]

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@Jörg, +1. Thanks for the mention of the shortcut. Overriding methods just became so much more elegant :) –  maček Apr 26 '10 at 19:30
    
With regards to "passing the same arguments": If you do a = 42 before using super without brackets, it'll use the new object referred to by a, not the old one. –  Andrew Grimm Apr 17 '11 at 23:15
    
What do you mean by "ruby doesn't have constuctors"? –  Leopd Apr 29 '13 at 18:10
    
@Leopd: Can you clarify your question? I'm not really sure what's unclear about that statement. –  Jörg W Mittag Apr 30 '13 at 2:15
5  
How does the initialize method differ from a construtor? It's a method that gets called when an object is created -- it quacks like a duck. –  Leopd Apr 30 '13 at 19:02

This code below will print :

A.proc1 B.proc1 C.proc1

module A
  def proc1
    puts "A.proc1"
    super
  end
end

class B
  def proc1
    puts "B.proc1"
  end
end

class C < B
  include A
  def proc1
    super
    puts "C.proc1"
  end
end

C.new.proc1
share|improve this answer
    
Yeap. I see. Thanks. –  Stas Kurilin Apr 18 '11 at 6:17

Use the super method! Ruby does not have multiple inheritance though.

class B

  attr_accessor :b, :bb

  def initialize(b, bb)
    @b, @bb = b, bb
  end

end

module C

end

class A < B
  include C  # <= if C was a class, you'd get: TypeError: wrong argument type Class (expected Module)

  attr_accessor :a, :aa

  def initialize(a,b,aa,bb)
    @a, @aa = a, aa
    super(b, bb)  # <= calls B#initialize
  end

end

a = A.new(1,2,3,4)
puts a.inspect # => #<A:0x42d6d8 @aa=3, @a=1, @b=2, @bb=4>
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