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I'm flip-flopping between naming conventions for typedef'ing the boost::shared_ptr template. For example:

typedef boost::shared_ptr<Foo> FooPtr;

Before settling on a convention, I'd like to see what others use. What is your convention?

EDIT:

To those nesting the typedef inside Foo, doesn't it bother you that Foo is now "aware" of how it will be passed around? It seems to break encapsulation. How about this:

class Foo
{
public:
    typedef std::vector<Foo> Vector
};

You wouldn't do this now, would you? :-)

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4  
To add to this question, how do people manage header inclusion when you declare such a typedef? Doesn't this wind up causing everyone to have to include Foo.h (rather than just saying "class Foo;"), leading to slow builds and possibly circular dependencies? –  Rob Napier Apr 27 '10 at 0:12
1  
I don't think that the nested typedef breaks encapsulation if you're using a factory. In fact, I'd say in that case it improves encapsulation in case the pointer type changes. –  rlbond Apr 27 '10 at 0:15

14 Answers 14

My preference:

class Foo
{
public:

    typedef boost::shared_ptr<Foo> SharedPointer;
};

The problem with just FooPtr is that you may have different types of pointers (e.g., weak_ptrs). I also don't much care for abbreviations, but that's another matter altogether.

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2  
As it's pointed out in the comments, this creates a problem with header inclusion. How would you use Foo::SharedPointer in a header file without including Foo.h? –  betabandido Sep 17 '13 at 22:19

Answer: don't do it. It's convenient for you and nobody else. Say what you mean.

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1  
Yup, I agree. Typedef'ing in this case only saves you typing and nothing else. It only adds one more indirection towards understanding the code. –  Paul Manta Dec 1 '11 at 18:12

Personally, in the code I'm responsible for, you'd typically see a FooPtr typedef'd at the same namespace scope as Foo and Foo would contain a generically named 'SmartPtr' typedef to the same type as FooPtr. Having FooPtr allows for easy an non-verbose manual usage. having the nested typedef for 'SmartPtr' or some quivalent allows for easy generic usage in templates, macros, etc. without having to know that actual type of the smart pointer.

Also, I'd suggest adding a 'subjective' tag to this question.

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I thought meta-tags like subjective were discouraged now - blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/08/the-death-of-meta-tags –  SCFrench Apr 22 '11 at 12:03

I'm not a big fan of Hungarian naming conventions, I usually use:

typedef boost::shared_ptr<Foo> FooSharedPtr;

Detailed enough to be clear but short enough to not be a huge hassle. In any case, I would definitely indicate it's specifically a shared pointer, especially if you're not the only one who's going to be using that type in the future.

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My first response is to ask, "Why typedef that?"

In reply to your edit: Actually that's a rather interesting approach that could be useful in many situations. Using it to go back to your original question you might have:


struct object
{
  typedef object* ptr_t;
  typedef shared_ptr<object> shared_ptr_t;
  typedef weak_ptr<object> weak_ptr_t;
  typedef unique_ptr<object> unique_ptr_t;
  etc...
}
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Forward declaration of class and ptrs before actual class declaration.

class Person;
typedef boost::shared_ptr<Person> person_ptr;
typedef boost::weak_ptr<Person> person_wptr;

class Person {
  ... 
  void own(person_ptr otherPerson); 
  ... 
  person_wptr parent;
}

Actually a namespace alias should be used for boost:: if people want to use TR1 or even the new Standard.

Add typedefs for container as needed...

typedef std::vector<person_ptr> vect_person_ptr; 
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class foo;

typedef boost::shared_ptr<foo> foo_p;
typedef boost::weak_ptr<foo> foo_wp;
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I have used both the outer and encapsulated typedef, but ended up with the first,

typedef boost::shared_ptr<Foo> FooPtr; 

solely because in combined expressions this looks cleaner than Foo::Ptr.

Doesn't it bother you that Foo is now "aware" of how it will be passed around?

Often enough, these classes are creatable through a factory method only:

struct Foo
{
     static FooPtr Create() { return FooPtr(new Foo); }

   protected:
     Foo() {}
}

That's kind of "stronger" than encapsulating the typedef, yet a very common pattern.

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1  
Added missing static keyword. –  Emile Cormier Apr 26 '10 at 23:18
    
oops! - thanks ;) –  peterchen Apr 27 '10 at 10:08

I usually encapsulate the the typedef inside the class. The reason is that we have some memory sensitive code, and it makes it easy to switch between boost::shared_ptr and boost::intrusive_ptr Since intrusive_ptr is something that the class needs to support, it makes sense to me to have the knowledge of which shared pointer to use be wrapped up in the class.

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It's nice when it ends with _t.

class Bar
{
public:
    typedef boost::shared_ptr<Bar> Ptr_t;
};
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14  
No it's not. Names ending _t are reserved for the implementation. –  Logan Capaldo Apr 26 '10 at 23:47
    
Bummer. It's a real surprise for me and rather unpleasant one. –  alex vasi Apr 27 '10 at 7:42

This was one of the conventions I was flip-flopping to:

typedef boost::shared_ptr<Foo> FooProxy;

...seeing that boost::shared_ptr is an application of the Proxy pattern.

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I'm generally not a fan of very short identifiers, but this is one case where I'll use them.

class Foo
{
public:
    typedef std::shared_ptr<Foo> p;
};

This enables shared_ptr to resemble ordinary pointers as closely as possible without risk of confusion.

Foo* myFoo;
Foo::p myFoo;

And as for breaking encapsulation—no, typedefing the shared_ptr type within the class doesn't break encapsulation any more than typedefing it outside of the class. What meaning of "encapsulation" would it violate? You're not revealing anything about the implementation of Foo. You're just defining a type. This is perfectly analogous to the relationship between Foo* and Foo. Foo* is a certain kind of pointer to Foo (the default kind, as it happens). Foo::p is another kind of pointer to Foo. You're not breaking encapsulation, you're just adding to the type system.

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typedef boost::shared_ptr&lt;MyClass> MyClass$;

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I've used the following: typedef boost::shared_ptr<Foo> Foo_rcptr_t;

This clearly indicates that it is a refcounted ptr.

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16  
I read "Foo_rcptr_t" as "Foo ROFLCOPTER type... what?" –  Wallacoloo Apr 26 '10 at 23:18
2  
I think it actually stands for "foo receptor type." –  Crazy Eddie Apr 26 '10 at 23:29
4  
Nah, It's gotta be "Foo radio controlled pointer type". –  Wallacoloo Apr 27 '10 at 1:47
    
rcptr = ref counted ptr. –  posharma Apr 27 '10 at 20:58

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