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MySQL has something like this:

INSERT INTO visits (ip, hits)
VALUES ('127.0.0.1', 1)
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE hits = hits + 1;

As far as I'm know this feature doesn't exist in SQLite, what I want to know is if there is any way to archive the same effect without having to execute two queries. Also, if this is not possible, what do you prefer:

  1. SELECT + (INSERT or UPDATE) or
  2. UPDATE (+ INSERT if UPDATE fails)
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I don't get option 2. :) –  systempuntoout Apr 26 '10 at 23:35
    
@systempuntoout: Check my comment on your answer in a bit. –  Alix Axel Apr 26 '10 at 23:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 63 down vote accepted
INSERT OR IGNORE INTO visits VALUES ($ip, 0);
UPDATE visits SET hits = hits + 1 WHERE ip LIKE $ip;

This requires the "ip" column to have a UNIQUE (or PRIMARY KEY) constraint.


EDIT: Another great solution: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4330694/89771.

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Brilliant, I totally forgot about the OR IGNORE clause. Nice one! –  Alix Axel Apr 27 '10 at 2:39
2  
Just for the record, REPLACE is not an option. –  Alix Axel Nov 17 '12 at 3:43

I'd prefer UPDATE (+ INSERT if UPDATE fails). Less code = fewer bugs.

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Thanks! @Sam (stackoverflow.com/questions/418898/…) seems to agree with you. I also prefer this approach. –  Alix Axel Apr 27 '10 at 0:08
1  
@codeholic where can i get the syntax for this method –  Smith Oct 11 '13 at 21:55
    
@Smith I meant using plain UPDATE and INSERT statements and checking return value. –  codeholic Nov 17 '13 at 14:47

The current answer will only work in sqlite OR mysql (depending on if you use OR or not). So, if you want cross dbms compatibility, the following will do...

REPLACE INTO `visits` (ip, value) VALUES ($ip, 0);
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2  
The accepted answer works on SQLite (that was my aim). REPLACE will work on SQLite too, but on MySQL it will always reset the counter to 0 - while the query will be portable, the end result will differ a lot. –  Alix Axel Nov 17 '12 at 3:45
    
You're right, I thought the OP was looking for something that was portable. I realize REPLACE INTO won't work with all cases, esp where PK preservation is needed, but will for many cases. –  Jacob Thomason Dec 7 '12 at 5:22
    
Failing cleanly instead of discarding data is a feature, not a bug. –  Tobu Apr 3 '13 at 6:50

You should use memcached for this since it is a single key (the IP address) storing a single value (the number of visits). You can use the atomic increment function to insure there are no "race" conditions.

It's faster than MySQL and saves the load so MySQL can focus on other things.

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If the data isn't that important, yes. However, if this is being used on a busy site where many IPs are hitting the service, the memcached instance(s) might get full and cause some content to be dropped. Backing up memcached contents would also be interesting (if required.) –  Elliot Foster Oct 13 '11 at 23:46
    
@ElliotFoster Memcached can handle as much data as the RAM you throw at it (if you want persitance also then use redis or membase). If you are getting over 1 million visitors day then you can probably afford giving your memcache instance more than 30MB of ram (which is the default I think). However, it can certainly handle a much higher load than SQLite and MySQL for the amount of memory you give it - there just isn't any comparison. –  Xeoncross Oct 14 '11 at 15:13
    
Please do not mistake my comment as a vote against memcache, as I think it is a fantastic tool. As is redis (I cannot speak for membase, as I've not used it.) However, memcache/redis are not the most reliable stores. Yes, redis has persistence, but data is persisted to disk on an interval (last I looked) and memcache not at all. Like I said, if the data isn't important (or can be reproduced easily) then memcache and company are great. The original post was also asking about sqlite, which is very different from MySQL and likely means they are limited in other ways. –  Elliot Foster Oct 15 '11 at 4:26

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