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It appears to me that tree selection events should happen after focus events, but this doesn't seem to be the case. Assume you have a JTree and a JTextField, where the JTextField is populated by what is selected in the tree. When the user changes the text field, on focus lost, you update the tree from the text field. however, the tree selection is changed before the focus is lost on the text field. this is incorrect, right? Any ideas? Here is some sample code:

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.event.*;

public class Focus extends JFrame
{
 public static void main(String[] args)
 {
  Focus f = new Focus();
  f.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
  f.setVisible(true);
 }

 public Focus()
 {
  Container cp = getContentPane();
  cp.setLayout(new BorderLayout());

  final JTextArea ta = new JTextArea(5, 10);
  cp.add(new JScrollPane(ta), BorderLayout.SOUTH);

  JSplitPane sp = new JSplitPane();
  cp.add(sp, BorderLayout.CENTER);

  JTree t = new JTree();
  t.addTreeSelectionListener(new TreeSelectionListener()
  {
   public void valueChanged(TreeSelectionEvent tse)
   {
    ta.append("Tree Selection changed\n");
   }
  });
  t.addFocusListener(new FocusListener()
  {
   public void focusGained(FocusEvent fe)
   {
    ta.append("Tree focus gained\n");
   }
   public void focusLost(FocusEvent fe)
   {
    ta.append("Tree focus lost\n");
   }
  });

  sp.setLeftComponent(new JScrollPane(t));
  JTextField f = new JTextField(10);
  sp.setRightComponent(f);

  pack();

  f.addFocusListener(new FocusListener()
  {
   public void focusGained(FocusEvent fe)
   {
    ta.append("Text field focus gained\n");
   }
    public void focusLost(FocusEvent fe)
{
    ta.append("Text field focus lost\n");
   }
  });
  setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
 }
}
share|improve this question
2  
You should never write code based on the ordering of events. –  camickr Apr 27 '10 at 2:40
    
You should build the GUI on the Event Dispatch Thread: java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/uiswing/concurrency/… –  trashgod Apr 27 '10 at 3:06
    
I agree with you: it would be more logical if the focus events were triggered before the tree selection event. –  Maurice Perry Apr 27 '10 at 5:38
    
so i shouldn't assume that the windowClosing event will precede the windowClosed event? interesting... –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 29 '10 at 2:09
    
it's been a while, but can't resist: i shouldn't assume that the windowClosing event will precede the windowClosed event - what a silly remark, except assuming you didn't read the doc ;-) –  kleopatra Dec 14 '11 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

Have your text field listener invoke setSelectionPath() to select the TreePath for the node that matches the text. The methods of DefaultMutableTreeNode can be used to traverse the tree. I'd use an ActionListener on the text field, but a FocusListener should work—just don't rely on the the order in which TreeSelectionListener events arrive.

Here's an example of obtaining the "pizza" node in the default JTree:

JTree tree = new JTree();
TreeNode node = (TreeNode) tree.getModel().getRoot();
node = node.getChildAt(2).getChildAt(1);
TreePath pizza = new TreePath(((DefaultMutableTreeNode) node).getPath());
share|improve this answer
    
no you misunderstand, perhaps i didn't explain. Whatever the user types in the text field, on loss of focus, should change the currently selected tree node. –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 29 '10 at 2:07
    
IIUC, setSelectionPath() does exactly that when called from focusLost(): it changes the selection to the specified TreePath. If you're trying to edit a node, it might be easier to use t.setEditable(true); this would allow editing in situ. –  trashgod Apr 29 '10 at 3:25
    
the text field might say 'fooo' but there is no fooo in the tree. in fact it might not even be the node label that is being changed -- it might just be a field in the user object of the selected node. –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 29 '10 at 5:08
    
It seems easy enough to check each user object while traversing the tree. I typically return null on failure; when passed to setSelectionPath(), null clears the selection. –  trashgod Apr 29 '10 at 13:58

Better news: I tried to defer the tree selection logic to the end of EDT, which will be executed after the text field's focus out!

JTree t = new JTree();
t.addTreeSelectionListener(new TreeSelectionListener()
{
   public void valueChanged(TreeSelectionEvent tse)
   {
       ta.append("Tree Selection changed\n");
       SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                logicInEDT...(tse);
            }
       });
    }
});

This solution solved my data binding issue. Hope it make sense to you too.

share|improve this answer

Bad news: I got the same issue when I select another tree node. Selecting the same tree node which your text field is editing is fine.

Good news: I found this issue was really old. See http://java.net/jira/browse/BINDING-67

share|improve this answer
    
The root reason as you said is TreeSelectionEvent is fired before the focus lost/gained event. And I tested with JTable and JList, both of them works fine, I mean, the selection event is fired AFTER the focus lost of the text field. –  JunLei Jun 20 '12 at 2:13
    
If you are using some data binding framework, I have to say maybe it's good to use MODIFY instead of FOCUS_OUT for the text field's commitment. Anyway, I have to go for this solution for the time being. Sorry, can't help more as that's all I found so far. –  JunLei Jun 20 '12 at 2:16

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