Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple video encoding worker role that pulls messages from a queue encodes a video then uploads the video to storage. Everything seems to be working but occasionally when deleting the message after I am done encoding and uploading I get a "StorageClientException: The specified message does not exist." Although the video is processed, I believe the message is reappearing in the queue because it's not being deleted correctly. I have the message visablilty set to 5 mins, none of the videos have taken more than 2 to process.

  • Is it possible that another instance of the Worker role is processing and deleting the message?
  • Doesn't the GetMessage() prevent other worker roles from picking up the same message?
  • Am I doing something wrong in the setup of my queue?
  • What could be causing this message to not be found on delete?

some code...

  //onStart() queue setup
  var queueStorage = _storageAccount.CreateCloudQueueClient();
  _queue = queueStorage.GetQueueReference(QueueReference);
  queueStorage.RetryPolicy = RetryPolicies.Retry(5, new TimeSpan(0, 5, 0));
  _queue.CreateIfNotExist();


 public override void Run()
  {
        while (true)
        {
            try
            {
                var msg = _queue.GetMessage(new TimeSpan(0, 5, 0));
                if (msg != null)
                {
                   EncodeIt(msg);
                   PostIt(msg);
                   _queue.DeleteMessage(msg);
                }
                else
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(WaitTime);
                }
            }
            catch (StorageClientException exception)
            {
                BlobTrace.Write(exception.ToString());
                Thread.Sleep(WaitTime);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Is it possible it's taking longer than the five minutes you've set as a timeout?

share|improve this answer
    
None of the videos have taken over 2 mins –  Aaron Apr 27 '10 at 16:13
    
Well, the code you pasted here looks fine, so I would look at the rest of the code or add some more logging to try to debug... nothing here looks suspicious. –  smarx Apr 28 '10 at 17:52

If encoding process takes more time than the message invisibility timeout (5 minutes in your case), then the message will show up in the queue again. This will cause second worker to start processing it. However, chances are that by the time second worker finishes processing, first worker would already be done with the work, deleting it properly. This will cause the second worker to fail at the deletion phase, since the message no longer exists for him.

This happens due to the lightweight transactional model by Windows Azure Queues. It guarantees, that the message will be processed at least once (even if the worker fails silently), but does not guarantee "only once" processing.

Since your encoding process seems to be idempotent and lightweight (since error shows up infrequently), I'd just I advise to increase the invisibility timeout and explicitly capture this exception (by status codes) around DeleteMessages (optionally logging the process duration in order to be able to tweak invisibility timeouts further).

share|improve this answer
    
I have timed the videos none of them take over 2 mins –  Aaron Apr 27 '10 at 16:13
    
With azure fabric you never know. I'd recommend to save processing time and all unhandled exceptions to the storage in order to debug the possible collisions post mortem. –  Rinat Abdullin Apr 27 '10 at 22:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I had my development, production and stage all pulling from the same queue this was causing some strange behavior. I believe this to be the culprit.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.