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Why cant I used a function returning a pointer as a lvalue?

For example this one works

int* function()
{
    int* x;
    return x;
}

int main()
{
    int* x = function();
    x = new int(9);
}

but not this

int* function()
{
    int* x;
    return x;
}

int main()
{
   int* x;
   function() = x;
}
  1. While I can use a pointer variable as a lvalue, why can't I use a function returning a pointer as a lvalue?

  2. Also, when the function returns a refernce, instead of a pointer, then it becomes a valid lvalue.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried putting parentheses around it? e.g. *(myfunction()) = x;... also, are you trying to assign to it, or to the location pointed to by it (i.e. x = somepointer;, or *x = somepointer;)? There's a difference. – Amber Apr 27 '10 at 4:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your first sample doesn't do why I think you think it does. You first store the result of the function call in the variable x and then you override x's value with the newly created array. *(function()) = 5 should properly try to write 5 to some random memory location specified by the local variable x inside your function.

Sample:

int x;

int* function()
{
    return &x;
}

int main()
{
   *(function()) = 5;
   printf("%d\n", x);
}
share|improve this answer

Please recheck the last statement of main() in second code snippet. Lvalues are variables that can be used to the left of the assignment operator (=). You're in effect assigning value x to a function instead of the other way round. A function may take arguments or return values. You cannot directly assign them a value.

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