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Given what I know of every other type of static feature of programming––I would think the answer is 'no'. However, seeing statements like OuterClass.StaticNestedClass nestedObject = new OuterClass.StaticNestedClass(); makes me wonder.

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3  
You could always try it and see if it compiles :-) – Adamski Apr 27 '10 at 7:55
1  
Why would you think that static inner classes are instance-controlled? This is a very interesting assumption, one that is perhaps worth investigating. Feel free to write as much as you want on how you understand things are, maybe it'll lead to more interesting discussions. – polygenelubricants Apr 27 '10 at 7:58
    
Why would you think that the answer is no? Just because you can use "static" for the singleton pattern? – Searles Apr 27 '10 at 8:01
3  
@polygenelubricants, @Searles: the source of the confusion seems pretty obvious to me. A static field "exists only once", and that's a concept novice programmers learn very early. Static methods can be (mis)understood like that too (which leads to questions like "do a lot of methods make objects bigger?). No wonder someone would be unclear about the rather different meaning of the keyword when applied to nested classes. – Michael Borgwardt Apr 27 '10 at 8:07
    
@Michael: very good point. This is a very good question now that I understand the source of the confusion. – polygenelubricants Apr 27 '10 at 8:12
up vote 19 down vote accepted

Yes, there is nothing in the semantics of a static nested type that would stop you from doing that. This snippet runs fine.

public class MultipleNested {
    static class Nested {
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            new Nested();
        }
    }
}

See also


Now, of course the nested type can do its own instance control (e.g. private constructors, singleton pattern, etc) but that has nothing to do with the fact that it's a nested type. Also, if the nested type is a static enum, of course you can't instantiate it at all.

But in general, yes, a static nested type can be instantiated multiple times.

Note that technically, a static nested type is not an "inner" type.

JLS 8.1.3 Inner Classes and Enclosing Instances

An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static.

That is, according to JLS terminology, an inner class is one that isn't static. If it's static, then it's just a nested type.


So what does static mean?

static simply means that the nested type does not need an instance of the enclosing type to be instantiated.

See also

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2  
Thanks! When I first think about it as I described in my comments on my question, my thought was "whatever is static is singular despite the enclosing context's instance". Now as I carefully consider your definition of 'static', I am re-defining my understanding of the term to be "whatever is static exists independently of the enclosing context's instance"––thus, a static nested class exists apart from an instance of it's parent class. And I believe this understanding of it would apply to static in the context of loop variables, function variables, and class members. – stormin986 Apr 27 '10 at 8:28
1  
And the more I think about it: relating the idea of 'singular' to 'static' is a subtle error to make. The only reason loop variables, function variables, and class fields were occurring to me as singular is because they are declarative statements, NOT type definition statements. Thus, a static class is the only thing (immediately coming to mind, at least) that is both static and able to be used to define new objects. – stormin986 Apr 27 '10 at 8:34
    
@stormin986: maybe ask another question, "What does static mean?". – polygenelubricants Apr 27 '10 at 8:56
    
polygenelubricants, just to double check I added a field "state" to the nested class and everything keep worked. cheers – Filippo Vitale Apr 19 '11 at 1:20

@polygenelubricants : But in general, yes, a static nested type can be instantiated multiple times.

Just to be sure 100% of that I extended your snippet:

public class MultipleInner {
    static class Inner {
        private int state;
        public int getState() { return state; }
        public void setState(int state) { this.state = state; }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Inner> inners = new ArrayList<Inner>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            Inner inner = new Inner();
            inner.setState(i);
            inners.add(inner);
        }
        for (Inner inner : inners) {
            System.out.println(inner.getState());
        }
    }
}

And of course the result is:

0
1
2
3
.
.
.
97
98
99
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It is legal. The fact that the inner class is static gives you a benefit here; its instances are not bound to any instance of the containing class, so they can be freely instantiated (as long as the access qualifier allows it).

The price, however, is that the inner class can't use non static members/methods of the containing class.

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Yeah you can make instances of it as many times as you want.

Maybe the reason why you see that, is because the programme thought about storing a reference somewhere. Though i agree with you seems strange :S

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Inner class can use non static members/methods of containing class. It can use them only through an object reference of the enclosing class-

     public class MultipleInner {
      private int outerstate =10;
      static class Inner {
        private int state;
        public int getState() { return state; }
        public void setState(int state) { this.state = state; }
      }

     public static void main(String[] args) {       
        Inner inner = new Inner();
        inner.setState(new MultipleInner().outerstate);
        System.out.println(inner.getState());        
     }

}

So, inner class doesn't have to pay the price of not being able to access the non static members of the enclosing class.

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