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Since the Linux kernel is GPL and not LGPL I suppose that it is illegal to link proprietary code to it. How does the industry circumvents this? I would expect that the GPL license will force any developer to release under GPL driver and/or kernel module.

Maybe I am confused and implementing a new module is not really linking against the kernel code ??? How do companies deal with this? Maybe linking the other way around (from kernel to their binaries)?

On the other hand there is the BSD kernel. Where you are free to link protected IP. Can you get a better design implementing your drivers within a BSD kernel? Is there any design restriction when implementing drivers for GPL kernels?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As you said the BSD license as used by the BSD kernel is much more liberal so it is no issue to link whatever licensed modules there.

For the linux case it is correct that the GPL per se forbids the linkage of non-GPL-compatible code which would not allow to link in proprietary modules, or even LGPL modules.

However, the linux copyright holders grant you to link your "LGPL" module with any proprietary code. An example for this is the nvidia driver:

/------------.-\
| Kernel       |
|              |
|   /--------\ |
|   | Module | |     /-------------------\
|   | (LGPL) <========> proprietary code |
|   \--------/ |     \-------------------/
\--------------/

This would still be illegal under GPL in general, but is explicitly allowed for the Linux kernel. As a reference, see what Linus Torvalds has to say about the issue here:

http://linuxmafia.com/faq/Kernel/proprietary-kernel-modules.html

P.S. Linking is a symmetrical operation in the terms of GPL.

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Just like I expected! But I did not know that the reverse process (linking from gpl to non gpl) is also illegal. For me is way strange that using the same text/license, it is ok by popular decision to allow such exception within the Linux kernel. I have yet to understand better this case, however now I am even more curious about how the design decisions (and overall quality) of a proprietary driver might be affected. –  SystematicFrank Apr 27 '10 at 15:34
    
@Francisco Garcia- The main thing to think about is this: are you linking your driver into the kernel, or is the kernel loading your driver as a module? If the former, then this GPL provision applies. If the latter, then your driver was essentially designed independent of the kernel and the kernel code's license does not alter your proprietary driver (since the kernel is pulling in your code instead of you pulling in the kernel's code). –  bta Apr 29 '10 at 23:26
    
I have to reiterate. In the GPL, linking is a symmetrical operation. Being it static or dynamic linking. It is a specific exception formulated for the linux kernel. It is true that the user may compile and link together what he wants in the end. It is not allowed to provide a pre-linked binary. –  ypnos Apr 30 '10 at 7:49

It is not the act of linking itself that activates the GPL restrictions.

It is the distribution of a "derived work" of the GPL work that activates the restrictions - you have to give anyone you gave the "derived work" to the source code needed to recreate the "derived work".

Now, the question becomes one of where the "derived work" line is drawn - which is far from crystal clear (and is likely to be different in different jurisdictions!). For example, if you distribute a compiled Linux kernel binary with your code statically linked in as a part of that, it's pretty clear that the whole binary is a "derived work". On the other hand, if you distribute just your module that uses only "published interfaces" of the kernel, then it probably isn't a "derived work".

There's lots of space in between those two positions, though. For example, if you distribute a device which contains flash memory containing a Linux kernel and a compiled binary driver, is the complete contents of the flash memory a "derived work"? It sure looks like it to me - but opinions differ, and only definitive answer will come when it's tested in court (and even then, only for the jurisdiction of that court).

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"flash" is irrelevant "memory containing a Linux kernel and a compiled binary driver" being next to a GPL file does not "contaminate" you. How you distribute the pieces (on several devices, on one device) does not matter WRT what is a "derivative work". –  curiousguy May 24 '13 at 23:37

I can't tell from your question, but you may be thinking about this backwards. If you are trying to use a proprietary driver on Linux, then yes, this should be allowed.

It is true that any code that links against GPL-ed code must itself be GPL-ed. However, GPL-ed code can link against closed-source libraries without altering the license of those libraries (otherwise, we could make every library in existence open-source simply by writing a GPL program and linking it against the library). Therefore, the GPL-ed Linux kernel can link against your closed-source driver without any problems.

That being said, this requires that the driver is written such that it is either fully self-contained or links only against libraries that allow unrestricted linking (LGPL, MIT, etc). That also means that your driver would need to be a loadable kernel module and not statically compiled into the kernel.

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"otherwise, we could make every library in existence open-source" that does not make any sense. –  curiousguy May 24 '13 at 22:35

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