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On the Apple guide, there is a step before building the AppStore version:

Open the Xcode project and Duplicate the “Release” configuration in the Configurations pane of the project's Info panel. Rename this new configuration “Distribution”.

Why this step is needed? Can I skip this step and use the "Release" configuration to build the final version for AppStore?

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Apple did the sensible thing and XCode 4 now has Distribution built in –  Casebash Apr 7 '11 at 6:29

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you keep your release and appstore configurations separate you're able then to test your application built with exactly the same settings as it will go to appstore and switch to that configuration with 1 click. It may be not necessary but (imo) is really handy.

Another reason may be that while developing you may want to play a bit with some project settings and be sure that your experiments won't go to distribution build by any chance.

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Yes, you're probably not going to want to test your application on your device using the default Debug build settings, because they will alter the performance characteristics, so having a Release build around is pretty handy. Also, you may wish to clone it for your ad-hoc build, which would require a different provisioning profile than your Distribution build. –  Brad Larson Apr 27 '10 at 14:19

You could name it "DebbieGibson" as long as you remember you set that configuration up for App Store distribution.

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I guess the real question is: is there any advantage to duplicating (then keeping) the "Release" configuration rather than just re-naming it? –  Nick Forge Apr 27 '10 at 13:45

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