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Recently at a job interview I was given the following problem:

  1. Write a script capable of running on the command line as python

  2. It should take in two words on the command line (or optionally if you'd prefer it can query the user to supply the two words via the console).

  3. Given those two words: a. Ensure they are of equal length b. Ensure they are both words present in the dictionary of valid words in the English language that you downloaded.

  4. If so compute whether you can reach the second word from the first by a series of steps as follows a. You can change one letter at a time b. Each time you change a letter the resulting word must also exist in the dictionary c. You cannot add or remove letters

  5. If the two words are reachable, the script should print out the path which leads as a single, shortest path from one word to the other.

  6. You can /usr/share/dict/words for your dictionary of words.

My solution consisted of using breadth first search to find a shortest path between two words. But apparently that wasn't good enough to get the job :(

Would you guys know what I could have done wrong? Thank you so much.

import collections
import functools
import re

def time_func(func):
    import time

    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        start = time.time()
        res = func(*args, **kwargs)
        timed = time.time() - start

        setattr(wrapper, 'time_taken', timed)
        return res

    functools.update_wrapper(wrapper, func)
    return wrapper

class OneLetterGame:
    def __init__(self, dict_path):
        self.dict_path = dict_path
        self.words = set()

    def run(self, start_word, end_word):
        '''Runs the one letter game with the given start and end words.
        '''
        assert len(start_word) == len(end_word), \
            'Start word and end word must of the same length.'

        self.read_dict(len(start_word))

        path = self.shortest_path(start_word, end_word)
        if not path:
            print 'There is no path between %s and %s (took %.2f sec.)' % (
                start_word, end_word, find_shortest_path.time_taken)
        else:
            print 'The shortest path (found in %.2f sec.) is:\n=> %s' % (
                self.shortest_path.time_taken, ' -- '.join(path))

    def _bfs(self, start):
        '''Implementation of breadth first search as a generator.

        The portion of the graph to explore is given on demand using get_neighboors.
        Care was taken so that a vertex / node is explored only once.
        '''
        queue = collections.deque([(None, start)])
        inqueue = set([start])

        while queue:
            parent, node = queue.popleft()
            yield parent, node

            new = set(self.get_neighbours(node)) - inqueue
            inqueue = inqueue | new
            queue.extend([(node, child) for child in new])

    @time_func
    def shortest_path(self, start, end):
        '''Returns the shortest path from start to end using bfs.
        '''
        assert start in self.words, 'Start word not in dictionnary.'
        assert end in self.words, 'End word not in dictionnary.'

        paths = {None: []}
        for parent, child in self._bfs(start):
            paths[child] = paths[parent] + [child]
            if child == end:
                return paths[child]
        return None

    def get_neighbours(self, word):
        '''Gets every word one letter away from the a given word.

        We do not keep these words in memory because bfs accesses 
        a given vertex only once.
        '''
        neighbours = []

        p_word = ['^' + word[0:i] + '\w' + word[i+1:] + '$' 
            for i, w in enumerate(word)]
        p_word = '|'.join(p_word)

        for w in self.words:
            if w != word and re.match(p_word, w, re.I|re.U):
                neighbours += [w]
        return neighbours

    def read_dict(self, size):
        '''Loads every word of a specific size from the dictionnary into memory.
        '''
        for l in open(self.dict_path):
            l = l.decode('latin-1').strip().lower()
            if len(l) == size:
                self.words.add(l)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import sys
    if len(sys.argv) not in [3, 4]:
        print 'Usage: python one_letter_game.py start_word end_word'
    else:
        g = OneLetterGame(dict_path = '/usr/share/dict/words')
        try:
            g.run(*sys.argv[1:])
        except AssertionError, e:
            print e

Thank you for all the great answers. I think what really got me is the fact that I do iterate over ALL words in the dictionary each time to consider possible word neighbors. Instead I could have used an inverted index as pointed by Duncan and Matt Anderson. A* approach would definitely have helped too. Thanks a lot, now I know what I have done wrong.

Here is the same code with inverted index:

import collections
import functools
import re

def time_func(func):
    import time

    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        start = time.time()
        res = func(*args, **kwargs)
        timed = time.time() - start

        setattr(wrapper, 'time_taken', timed)
        return res

    functools.update_wrapper(wrapper, func)
    return wrapper

class OneLetterGame:
    def __init__(self, dict_path):
        self.dict_path = dict_path
        self.words = {}

    def run(self, start_word, end_word):
        '''Runs the one letter game with the given start and end words.
        '''
        assert len(start_word) == len(end_word), \
            'Start word and end word must of the same length.'

        self.read_dict(len(start_word))

        path = self.shortest_path(start_word, end_word)
        if not path:
            print 'There is no path between %s and %s (took %.2f sec.)' % (
                start_word, end_word, self.shortest_path.time_taken)
        else:
            print 'The shortest path (found in %.2f sec.) is:\n=> %s' % (
                self.shortest_path.time_taken, ' -- '.join(path))

    def _bfs(self, start):
        '''Implementation of breadth first search as a generator.

        The portion of the graph to explore is given on demand using get_neighboors.
        Care was taken so that a vertex / node is explored only once.
        '''
        queue = collections.deque([(None, start)])
        inqueue = set([start])

        while queue:
            parent, node = queue.popleft()
            yield parent, node

            new = set(self.get_neighbours(node)) - inqueue
            inqueue = inqueue | new
            queue.extend([(node, child) for child in new])

    @time_func
    def shortest_path(self, start, end):
        '''Returns the shortest path from start to end using bfs.
        '''
        assert self.in_dictionnary(start), 'Start word not in dictionnary.'
        assert self.in_dictionnary(end), 'End word not in dictionnary.'

        paths = {None: []}
        for parent, child in self._bfs(start):
            paths[child] = paths[parent] + [child]
            if child == end:
                return paths[child]
        return None

    def in_dictionnary(self, word):
        for s in self.get_steps(word):
            if s in self.words:
                return True
        return False

    def get_neighbours(self, word):
        '''Gets every word one letter away from the a given word.
        '''
        for step in self.get_steps(word):
            for neighbour in self.words[step]:
                yield neighbour

    def get_steps(self, word):
        return (word[0:i] + '*' + word[i+1:] 
            for i, w in enumerate(word))

    def read_dict(self, size):
        '''Loads every word of a specific size from the dictionnary into an inverted index.
        '''
        for w in open(self.dict_path):
            w = w.decode('latin-1').strip().lower()
            if len(w) != size:
                continue
            for step in self.get_steps(w):
                if step not in self.words:
                    self.words[step] = [] 
                self.words[step].append(w)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import sys
    if len(sys.argv) not in [3, 4]:
        print 'Usage: python one_letter_game.py start_word end_word'
    else:
        g = OneLetterGame(dict_path = '/usr/share/dict/words')
        try:
            g.run(*sys.argv[1:])
        except AssertionError, e:
            print e

And a timing comparison:

% python one_letter_game_old.py happy hello The shortest path (found in 91.57 sec.) is:
=> happy -- harpy -- harps -- harts -- halts -- halls -- hells -- hello

% python one_letter_game.py happy hello The shortest path (found in 1.71 sec.) is:
=> happy -- harpy -- harps -- harts -- halts -- halls -- hells -- hello

share|improve this question
7  
I didn't go through your code, but just because you didn't get the job doesn't mean this was your error. Did they tell you that? –  MJB Apr 27 '10 at 13:21
    
well i tried to ask but their policy is that "they are not permitted to provide further feedback" ... –  Alex K Apr 27 '10 at 13:25
    
Similar problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/2534087/… –  FogleBird Apr 27 '10 at 13:27
2  
I agree with MJB. There are probably more efficient solutions, but your code looks fine. If they're going to be vague and uncommunicative, I can't imagine that would have been a fun place to work. –  Cerin Apr 27 '10 at 13:33
3  
That seems a little crazy for a job interview question. Unless this was an over the Internet type question or some similar situation as a job interviewer I wouldn't expect a perfect solution. Cheer up though, as others have said, this alone wouldn't mean you didn't get the job. Sometimes interviews don't work out. –  The Jug Apr 27 '10 at 13:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I wouldn't say your solution is wrong, but it is a little slow. For two reasons.

  1. Breadth-first-search is going to visit all paths of length one shorter than is needed, plus some-to-all of paths of length needed, before it can give you an answer. A best-first-search (A*) will ideally skip most irrelevant paths.

  2. You're checking every word in the dictionary for candidacy as a neighbor each time you look for neighbors. As Duncan suggests, you can build a data structure to essentially look up the neighbors instead of searching for them.

Here is another solution to your problem:

import collections
import heapq
import time

def distance(start, end):
    steps = 0
    for pos in range(len(start)):
        if start[pos] != end[pos]:
            steps += 1
    return steps


class SearchHeap(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.on_heap = set()
        self.heap = []

    def push(self, distance, word, path):
        if word in self.on_heap:
            return
        self.on_heap.add(word)
        heapq.heappush(self.heap, ((distance, len(path)), word, path))

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.heap)

    def pop(self):
        return heapq.heappop(self.heap)


class OneLetterGame(object):
    _word_data = None

    def __init__(self, dict_path):
        self.dict_path = dict_path

    def run(self, start_word, end_word):
        start_time = time.time()
        self._word_data = collections.defaultdict(list)
        if len(start_word) != len(end_word):
            print 'words of different length; no path'
            return

        found_start, found_end = self._load_words(start_word, end_word)
        if not found_start:
            print 'start word %r not found in dictionary' % start_word
            return
        if not found_end:
            print 'end word %r not found in dictionary' % end_word
            return

        search_start_time = time.time()
        path = self._shortest_path(start_word, end_word)
        search_time = time.time() - search_start_time
        print 'search time was %.4f seconds' % search_time

        if path:
            print path
        else:
            print 'no path found from %r to %r' % (start_word, end_word)

        run_time = time.time() - start_time
        print 'total run time was %.4f seconds' % run_time

    def _load_words(self, start_word, end_word):
        found_start, found_end = False, False
        length = len(start_word)
        with open(self.dict_path) as words:
            for word in words:
                word = word.strip()
                if len(word) == length:
                    if start_word == word: found_start = True
                    if end_word == word: found_end = True
                    for bucket in self._buckets_for(word):
                        self._word_data[bucket].append(word)
        return found_start, found_end

    def _shortest_path(self, start_word, end_word):
        heap = SearchHeap()
        heap.push(distance(start_word, end_word), start_word, (start_word,))
        while len(heap):
            dist, word, path = heap.pop()
            if word == end_word:
                return path
            for neighbor in self._neighbors_of(word):
                heap.push(
                    distance(neighbor, end_word), 
                    neighbor, 
                    path + (neighbor,))
        return ()

    def _buckets_for(self, word):
        buckets = []
        for pos in range(len(word)):
            front, back = word[:pos], word[pos+1:]
            buckets.append(front+'*'+back)
        return buckets

    def _neighbors_of(self, word):
        for bucket in self._buckets_for(word):
            for word in self._word_data[bucket]:
                yield word

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import sys
    if len(sys.argv) not in [3, 4]:
        print 'Usage: python one_letter_game.py start_word end_word'
    else:
        matt = OneLetterGame(dict_path = '/usr/share/dict/words')
        matt.run(*sys.argv[1:])

And, a timing comparison:

% python /tmp/one_letter_alex.py canoe happy
The shortest path (found in 51.98 sec.) is:
=> canoe -- canon -- caxon -- taxon -- taxor -- taxer -- taper -- paper -- papey -- pappy -- happy

% python /tmp/one_letter_matt.py canoe happy
search time was 0.0020 seconds
('canoe', 'canon', 'caxon', 'taxon', 'taxor', 'taxer', 'taper', 'paper', 'papey', 'pappy', 'happy')
total run time was 0.2416 seconds
share|improve this answer

I agree that it would be odd to expect your answer to this programming test to be the sole reason why they chose someone else, but there are actually problems with your code. You do a linear search through the dictionary for every step of the path, or every potential path. That could take a long time for a large dictionary and lots of potential paths. Also it is pretty obvious you didn't test it thoroughly as it fails when there is no path.

If I were coding this I'd create a dictionary when loading the words that would remove the linear search by letting you pick out the next words pretty well directly. This code isn't the complete solution but should indicate what I mean:

words = {}

def get_keys(word):
    """Generate keys from a word by replacing each letter in turn by an asterisk"""
    for i in range(len(word)):
        yield word[:i]+'*'+word[i+1:]

def get_steps(word):
    """Find the set of all words that can link to the given word."""
    steps = []
    for key in get_keys(word):
        steps.extend(words[key])
    steps = set(steps) - set([word])
    return steps

# Load the dictionary
for word in ('start', 'stare', 'spare', 'spore'):
    for key in get_keys(word):
        if key not in words:
            words[key] = []
        words[key].append(word)

print(words)
print(get_steps('stare'))
share|improve this answer

Maybe they expected the A* search with the edit distance as the estimate?

share|improve this answer

Maybe you did not want to work at a jerk company like that to begin with. I personally do not believe in code reviews. I think if you do a good enough job with checking out the portfolio and past references that there is no need for such at the spot code tests. Companies with stringent policies like these are the ones that never make it eventually as all they employ is one track code nerds that are thinking code 24/7. Just my 2 cents.

share|improve this answer
5  
Is this a satirical post? I honestly can't tell. –  Andrew Barrett Apr 27 '10 at 15:29
    
Why do you fee it is satirical? –  jini Apr 27 '10 at 18:27
1  
Because the "one-track code nerds" are the ones that make a project succeed... and largely the ones who visit sites like this –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 30 '10 at 15:46

Maybe you forgot to add the shebang? >-|

Or maybe they just didn't like your coding style... For example, I wouldn't have made a class for such a simple problem, it's over-engineering the solution (although I'm not that picky to base the hiring decision only on that, of course).

share|improve this answer

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