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I have a stylesheet and a lot of styles with the same border color (#CCCCCC to be precise).

Is there a way to specify some kind of variable and reuse that, so instead of typing #CCCCCC over and over, I can type:

border: 1px solid $bordercolor;

P.S. I'm using ASP.NET MVC.

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Not that I'm aware of, but you could generate your CSS from a .NET page. (Added answer below with a more detail) –  CaffGeek Apr 27 '10 at 13:38
    
+1 Excellent question. I have this problem as well. –  C. Ross Apr 27 '10 at 14:09
    
Not sure if it's applicable (and I've barely used it), but Sass (sass-lang.com) would seem to cover this. It's written in Ruby (I think), but there is IronRuby now... –  Benjamin Oakes Apr 27 '10 at 15:04

13 Answers 13

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Not that I'm aware of, but you could generate your CSS from a .NET page.

Then call it with

And StyleSheet.aspx would look something like

<%@ Page Language="C#" %> 
H1 
{ 
  background-color:<%= MyColourVariable %>; 
}

EDIT: However, today I would suggest using LESS or SASS

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1  
Does dynamically creating a css file prevent it from being cached? –  Jens Apr 27 '10 at 13:44
1  
Jens, no. Caching is dependent upon mime type of the asset served, and the specific properties upon the asset the browser looks, which vary by browser, to determine if the cache is out of data. –  austin cheney Apr 27 '10 at 13:48
1  
And you can always add the page caching if you want some control over it at the server side (so it's not recreated at the server every time) support.microsoft.com/kb/308375 –  CaffGeek Apr 27 '10 at 13:54
    
Aha, why generate all my pages and not my stylesheet? Good thinking, and maintainable too –  Michel Apr 27 '10 at 14:34
    
Few months back, I also tried T4 for generating the stylesheets. The source doesn't look really pretty but the good part is that it is generated at design time. The template then looks like this: <#@ template debug="false" hostspecific="false" language="C#" #> <#@ output extension=".css" #> <# const string textareaHeight= "150px";#> .resizableTextareaFocus{ height: <#=textareaHeight#>; } –  Michel Jul 10 '13 at 6:48
.classA, .classB, .classC {
   border-color: #CCC;
}

.classA {
   border-width: 1px;
   border-style: solid;
}

...

But you can't use the short-hand syntax to define the border anymore.

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Nice, i don't actually use that, putting selectors more than once in the stylesheet. i'm seeing this as reverse css coding: not say "classA is border-color this and font that", but say "border-color this is applied to ClassA and ClassB, and font that is applied to Class C". Very nice. –  Michel Apr 27 '10 at 14:33
    
I do this kind of thing regularly, if I don't want borders on all sides, i.e. border-width: 1px 0; border-style: solid; border-color: #ccc –  DisgruntledGoat Apr 28 '10 at 10:09

An element may have multiple classes assigned. So you could create one style that defines you border color and use it in conjunction with other classes for other attributes:

.bordercolor { border-color:#CCCCCC; }

<div class="bordercolor otherstyle">
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You could also use a "higher-level" CSS. Sass and Less both offer variables. They work by writing in a language that is a superset of CSS and then you compile it to CSS when you are testing/deploying. There are hooks for RoR for both, there might be one for asp.net.

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cool. Less looks very promising. –  Michel Apr 27 '10 at 14:31
1  
I should mention that Sass has an alternate syntax which is similar to CSS's. –  Henrik Hansen Apr 27 '10 at 20:21

You can't really define variables in CSS, but you can sort of do what you are after a few ways. First, you could apply multiple classes to your element and just keep color in it's own class.

.myBorderColor { border-color: #000000; }
.myOtherClass { font-weight: bold; }

<div class="myBorderColor myOtherClass">content</div>

The other alternative is to actually cascade your styles so more than 1 block is applied.

div.a { font-weight: bold; }
div.b { color: #cccccc; }

div.a div.b { border-color: #000000; }

That way you are still controlling your color from 1 place.

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3  
Just make sure you don't follow the style our web designer uses and name the classes "fontbold" and "borderblack"/"bordergray"/"borderblue"... That is really bad style as the names should tell how it's used, not how it looks. –  dbemerlin Apr 27 '10 at 13:50
    
Using a class .myBorderColor is precisely what dbmerlin is refering to. –  ANeves Apr 27 '10 at 14:19
    
@dbemerlin i think when i would start to apply this technique i would be tempted too to use names like borderblue and borderblack, because i think it would be easy in the beginning to use these kind of names in stead of more descriptive names. But you're right, that's not the way to go. –  Michel Apr 27 '10 at 14:45
1  
The catch to giving a style a name like "blackBorderBox", in case this isn't apparent, is that if you use a name like this, and then use that class everywhere that you want a box with a black border, and then later you decide that those boxes should have a blue border ... do you change the name and all the references? What a pain! Or do you leave the name and leave readers to wonder why it's called "black" when in fact it's blue. Or worse ... –  Jay Apr 27 '10 at 17:10
1  
(continued) What if you decide that SOME of these boxes should be changed to have a blue border? Now you have to check every reference to figure out which should be blue and which should be black. Much smarter to create classes for, say, "QuoteBox" and "CatPictureBox" and "HeadlineBox", even if they're all identical now, because tomorrow they might not be. (Yes, this lesson can be overlearned and you end up creating 600 classes for every possible use of italics, don't go crazy.) –  Jay Apr 27 '10 at 17:13

I think you may be referring to CSS variables. Unfortunately they are not well supported.

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That would be great if it was supported ... –  C. Ross Apr 27 '10 at 14:11
    
Yes! but indeed, Unfortunately... –  Michel Apr 27 '10 at 14:42

You can serve your CSS as a php file with the type text/css. Then that way you can use all the PHP variables you want. This works in every browser. Here is an example:

http://mailmarkup.org/mmlorg.php

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A number of folks have done HttpHandlers that add variable support to CSS. Basically, the HttpHandler takes care of replacing the variables with their values before the client sees the CSS. Examples include:

This will certainly work. I have not tried it in any of my applications so I cannot speak to performance implications.

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Aside from generating it from a .NET page you could use some sort of pre-processor. There are general use ones such as m4 or CSS specific ones such as LESS.

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I was thinking about the T4 template too. It's Visual Studio only i think, so it's not the most generic way to go, but i thought i'd share it.

<#@ template inherits="Microsoft.VisualStudio.TextTemplating.VSHost.ModelingTextTransformation" language="C#v3.5" debug="true" hostSpecific="true" #>
<#@ output extension=".css" #>
<# string font = " font-family: Verdana, Helvetica;\n\tfont-size: 11px;";#>

body { 
    <#= font #>
}
table.Bid {
    background-color:red;
    <#= font #>
}

This generates a test.css file with this content:

body { 
     font-family: Verdana, Helvetica;
    font-size: 11px;
}
table.Bid {
    background-color:red;
     font-family: Verdana, Helvetica;
    font-size: 11px;
}
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You could set the border style for a parent tag. For example if every element in your #content uses this border properties you could apply the desired border style to #content itself.

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Extend the style within the color is defined

LE: see the sample from KennyTM

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-1: no real content. –  ANeves Apr 27 '10 at 14:21

In Rails, this works great for me:

http://unixgods.org/~tilo/Ruby/Using_Variables_in_CSS_Files_with_Ruby_on_Rails.html

maybe you could write a similar pre-processor for the .NET framework..?

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