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How to handle the case where the token 'for' is used in two different situations in the language to parse? Such as statement and as a "parameter" as the following example:

echo for print example
for i in {0..10..2}
  do
     echo "Welcome $i times"
 done

Output:

for print example
Welcome 0 times
Welcome 2 times
Welcome 4 times
Welcome 6 times
Welcome 8 times
Welcome 10 times

Thanks.

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Is "for" just something to be printed in the first example, or does it also have a meaning? –  wvd Apr 27 '10 at 16:44
    
'for' is a KEYWORD of language but in some cases becomes a simple string to print in output (as when it follows in any order, the echo command). –  batman_for Apr 27 '10 at 16:53

3 Answers 3

The only way I see how you could go about doing this, is define an Echo rule in your lexer grammar that matches the characters echo followed by all other characters except \r and \n:

Echo
  :  'echo' ~('\r' | '\n')+
  ;

and make sure that rule is before the rule that matches identifiers and keywords (like for).

A quick demo of a possible start would be:

grammar Test;

parse
  :  (echo | for)*
  ;

echo
  :  Echo (NewLine | EOF)
  ;

for 
  :  For Identifier In range NewLine
     Do NewLine
     echo
     Done (NewLine | EOF)
  ;

range
  :  '{' Integer '..' Integer ('..' Integer)? '}'
  ;

Echo
  :  'echo' ~('\r' | '\n')+
  ;

For  : 'for';
In   : 'in';
Do   : 'do';
Done : 'done';

Identifier
  :  ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z' | '_') ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z' | '_' | '0'..'9')*
  ;

Integer
  :  '0'..'9'+
  ;

NewLine
  :  '\r' '\n'
  |  '\n'
  |  '\r'
  ;

Space
  :  (' ' | '\t') {skip();}
  ;

If you'd parse the input:

echo for print example
for i in {0..10..2}
do
  echo "Welcome $i times"
done
echo the end for now!

with it, it would look like:

alt text

(I had to rotate the image a bit, otherwise it wouldn't be visible at all!)

HTH.

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Well, it's pretty easy, most grammars use something like this:

TOKEN_REF
    :   'A'..'Z' ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'_'|'0'..'9')*
    ;

So when referring to a print statement you would do something like:

'print' (TOKEN_REF)*

And with a for statement you just explicity state 'for' such as:

'for' INT 'in' SOMETHING
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No, I can't see that working. Let's say there is a FOR rule that looks like FOR : 'for';. Now if FOR gets tokenized before TOKEN_REF, then TOKEN_REF could never contain the characters for (and therefore 'print' (TOKEN_REF)* can never contain 'for'). But if TOKEN_REF gets tokenized before FOR, then the FOR rule will never be matched since TOKEN_REF will always match for. Did you try what you suggested? If so, did it work and would you care to post it? Thanks. –  Bart Kiers May 4 '10 at 7:29

In order to do that you need to use a semantic predicate to only take that lexer rule when it really is the for keyword.

Details are available on the keywords as identifiers page on the ANTLR wiki.

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