Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I submitted a Changelist in Perforce, but I forgot to remove a couple of files from the list first. I want to undo those changes. I understand that Perforce allows me to "rollback" -- but that just submits another change to the file, cluttering my branch. This is a file I did not intend to change at all. When I go to integrate back into the baseline, this file shows up as needing to be integrated (even though it's the same as what's on the baseline).

In Clearcase, I had the ability to simply issue a "destroy" command on the specific version of the file, nuking it from the repository, as if had never been (yes, I realize this is scary from a revision control perspective - I understand the risks).

Is there an equivalent command in Perforce? Or am I trying to do something expressly forbidden?

share|improve this question
    
Obliterate should only be used as a command of last resort. If it's only a couple of files it's hardly "cluttering" your branch. –  ChrisF Apr 27 '10 at 17:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Perforce obliterate should be a good equivalent for cleartool rmver

p4 obliterate -y file#3,5

Obliterate revisions 3, 4, and 5 of file.

If #5 was the head revision, the new head revision is now #2, and the next revision will be #3.
If #5 was not the head revision, the head revision remains unchanged.

share|improve this answer

Perforce does allow super-users to destroy revisions. Horrible, horrible idea. I don't see why you can't just rollback.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sometimes, maybe for legal reasons, you really don't want files to ever have been in your repository. Or maybe you accidentally checked in a really big file. In general, though, rolling back is the correct thing to do. –  Roger Lipscombe Mar 31 '12 at 15:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.