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Let's say I want to enforce a rule:

Everytime you call "StartJumping()" in your function, you must call "EndJumping()" before you return.

When a developer is writing their code, they may simply forget to call EndSomething - so I want to make it easy to remember.

I can think of only one way to do this: and it abuses the "using" keyword:

class Jumper : IDisposable {
    public Jumper() {   Jumper.StartJumping(); }
    public void Dispose() {  Jumper.EndJumping(); }

    public static void StartJumping() {...}
    public static void EndJumping() {...}
}

public bool SomeFunction() {
    // do some stuff

    // start jumping...
    using(new Jumper()) {
        // do more stuff
        // while jumping

    }  // end jumping
}

Is there a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
3  
I strongly agree that this is an abuse. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2101524 – Eric Lippert Apr 27 '10 at 22:27
2  
@Eric: this keeps popping up over and over again, the pattern is useful. Something to consider as a language extension without the baggage of IDisposable? I'm partial to a "with" keyword, although I don't care for IWithable :) – Hans Passant Apr 27 '10 at 23:57
2  
Hmmm - if @Eric Lippert thinks its an abuse one should take note!! I would tend to agree that its an abuse of the intention of the using statement simply because the intention of Dispose is around resource clean-up. The thing is if you are concerned that EndJumping won't get called, isn't that the same issue if the coders do not write the code with the using statement? – Paul Kohler Apr 28 '10 at 0:17
    
@Paul: As it's written above, there is a possibility that someone can avoid using using and fail to call EndJumping. However, it's easily fixed by making the static functions private, and only accessible via using. – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 28 '10 at 3:23
    
@Eric - something so useful surely cant be wrong! – James Westgate Apr 28 '10 at 7:45

12 Answers 12

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'm going to disagree with Eric: when to do this or not depends on the circumstances. At one point, I was reworking my a large code base to include acquire/release semantics around all accesses to a custom image class. Images were originally allocated in unmoving blocks of memory, but we now had the ability to put the images into blocks that were allowed to be moved if they hadn't been acquired. In my code, it is a serious bug for a block of memory to have slipped past unlocked.

Therefore, it is vital to enforce this. I created this class:

public class ResourceReleaser<T> : IDisposable
{
    private Action<T> _action;
    private bool _disposed;
    private T _val;

    public ResourceReleaser(T val, Action<T> action)
    {
        if (action == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
        _action = action;
        _val = val;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    ~ResourceReleaser()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (_disposed)
            return;

        if (disposing)
        {
            _disposed = true;
            _action(_val);
        }
    }
}

which allows me to do make this subclass:

public class PixelMemoryLocker : ResourceReleaser<PixelMemory>
{
    public PixelMemoryLocker(PixelMemory mem)
        : base(mem,
        (pm =>
            {
                if (pm != null)
                    pm.Unlock();
            }
        ))
    {
        if (mem != null)
            mem.Lock();
    }

    public PixelMemoryLocker(AtalaImage image)
        : this(image == null ? null : image.PixelMemory)
    {
    }
}

Which in turn lets me write this code:

using (var locker = new PixelMemoryLocker(image)) {
    // .. pixel memory is now locked and ready to work with
}

This does the work I need and a quick search tells me I needed it in 186 places that I can guarantee won't ever fail to unlock. And I have to be able to make this guarantee - to do otherwise could freeze a huge chunk of memory in my client's heap. I can't do that.

However, in another case where I do work handling encryption of PDF documents, all strings and streams are encrypted in PDF dictionaries except when they're not. Really. There are a tiny number of edge cases wherein it is incorrect to encrypt or decrypt the dictionaries so while streaming out an object, I do this:

if (context.IsEncrypting)
{
    crypt = context.Encryption;
    if (!ShouldBeEncrypted(crypt))
    {
        context.SuspendEncryption();
        suspendedEncryption = true;
    }
}
// ... more code ...
if (suspendedEncryption)
{
    context.ResumeEncryption();
}

so why did I choose this over the RAII approach? Well, any exception that happens in the ... more code ... means that you are dead in the water. There is no recovery. There can be no recovery. You have to start over from the very beginning and the context object needs to be reconstructed, so it's state is hosed anyway. And by comparison, I only had to do this code 4 times - the possibility for error is way, way less than in the memory locking code, and if I forget one in the future, the generated document is going to be broken immediately (fail fast).

So pick RAII when you absolutely positively HAVE to have the bracketed call and can't fail. Don't bother with RAII if it is trivial to do otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Could we narrow the proposition 'depends on the circumstances' to 'whenever your class is responsible for irreducibly global resources (like memory)'? – Jeff Sternal Apr 28 '10 at 15:51
    
@JeffSternal: Can you point to anyplace where Microsoft actually "defines" the term "resource"? I would posit that an object acquires a resource any time it asks some other entity to do something on its behalf until further notice, to the detriment of itself or other entities. Memory is not a terribly compelling example of a resource, because it's fungible. Things like locks or files (which effectively contain locks) are a much more important example, but what's fundamental is that an object has some other entity keeping its state in a less-than-ideal condition on its behalf. – supercat Sep 28 '14 at 18:29

Essentially the problem is:

  • I have global state...
  • and I want to mutate that global state...
  • but I want to make sure that I mutate it back.

You have discovered that it hurts when you do that. My advice is rather than trying to find a way to make it hurt less, try to find a way to not do the painful thing in the first place.

I am well aware of how hard this is. When we added lambdas to C# in v3 we had a big problem. Consider the following:

void M(Func<int, int> f) { }
void M(Func<string, int> f) { }
...
M(x=>x.Length);

How on earth do we bind this successfully? Well, what we do is try both (x is int, or x is string) and see which, if any, gives us an error. The ones that don't give errors become candidates for overload resolution.

The error reporting engine in the compiler is global state. In C# 1 and 2 there had never been a situation where we had to say "bind this entire method body for the purposes of determining if it had any errors but don't report the errors". After all, in this program you do not want to get the error "int doesn't have a property called Length", you want it to discover that, make a note of it, and not report it.

So what I did was exactly what you did. Start suppressing error reporting, but don't forget to STOP suppressing error reporting.

It's terrible. What we really ought to do is redesign the compiler so that errors are output of the semantic analyzer, not global state of the compiler. However, it's hard to thread that through hundreds of thousands of lines of existing code that depends on that global state.

Anyway, something else to think about. Your "using" solution has the effect of stopping jumping when an exception is thrown. Is that the right thing to do? It might not be. After all, an unexpected, unhandled exception has been thrown. The entire system could be massively unstable. None of your internal state invariants might be actually invariant in this scenario.

Look at it this way: I mutated global state. I then got an unexpected, unhandled exception. I know, I think I'll mutate global state again! That'll help! Seems like a very, very bad idea.

Of course, it depends on what the mutation to global state is. If it is "start reporting errors to the user again" as it is in the compiler then the correct thing to do for an unhandled exception is to start reporting errors to the user again: after all, we're going to need to report the error that the compiler just had an unhandled exception!

If on the other hand the mutation to global state is "unlock the resource and allow it to be observed and used by untrustworthy code" then it is potentially a VERY BAD IDEA to automatically unlock it. That unexpected, unhandled exception might be evidence of an attack on your code, from an attacker who is dearly hoping that you are going to unlock access to global state now that it is in a vulnerable, inconsistent form.

share|improve this answer
2  
I've given this +1, but the problem is it doesn't offer any useful alternative :-( – Mark Hurd Apr 28 '10 at 1:38
3  
@Jeffrey: I'm not so sure I agree with your analysis. The "using" statement is intended to facilitate timely disposal of precious system resources. Yes, that is "mutating global state" in a sense, but it is state external to the program, and it is done out of politeness, not necessity. The foreach behaviour is just a special case of the using behaviour. The only real analogy to the start/end behaviour is the lock statement, which is the single hardest statement to get right in C# because it manipulates global state. – Eric Lippert Apr 28 '10 at 14:06
3  
@Jeff: It does have a more general counterpart; both lock and using are special cases of try-finally. – Eric Lippert Apr 28 '10 at 20:02
2  
@Eric Lippert: I'm not sure why you think iDisposable should only be for precious "system" resources; it seems to me that its use is proper if objects of a class will own anything--precious or not--that will exist or have meaning beyond the useful lifetime of those objects. While exceptions can sometimes corrupt system state in such a way that Dispose won't help, they can also corrupt state in such a way that Dispose is necessary and sufficient to fix (especially common with transactions). – supercat Nov 2 '10 at 18:26
2  
@sgorozco: I would not use using for that personally. That's not a resource at all. – Eric Lippert Jun 26 '13 at 18:43

If you need to control a scoped operation, I would add a method which take an Action<Jumper> to contain the required operations on the jumper instance:

public static void Jump(Action<Jumper> jumpAction)
{
    StartJumping();
    Jumper j = new Jumper();
    jumpAction(j);
    EndJumping();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This makes it impossible to call StartJumping/EndJumping in different UI callbacks, or generally in response to two different events from the environment. – liori Apr 27 '10 at 22:10
    
I like this, but it would be hard to breakup existing functions just so they can be called by static Jump - it's like dependency injection(?). – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 27 '10 at 22:24
    
This is a good solution but it requires you to build the sequence from the inside-out C(B(A)) rather than in the order you want things to happen. A fluent interface can help fix that: A.B.C(). – Ian Mercer Apr 28 '10 at 0:07

An alternative approach that would work in some circumstances (i.e. when the actions can all happen at the end) would be to create a series of classes with a fluent interface and some final Execute() method.

var sequence = StartJumping().Then(some_other_method).Then(some_third_method);
// forgot to do EndJumping()
sequence.Execute();

Execute() can chain back down line and enforce any rules (or you can build the closing sequence as you build the opening sequence).

The one advantage this technique has over others is that you aren't limited by scoping rules. e.g. if you want to build the sequence based on user inputs or other asynchronous events you can do that.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea. This allows anonymous delegates (lambdas) as well. – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 28 '10 at 16:52
    
It has another advantage over using() which is that using() provides no enforcement that you actually use it in a using(). – Ian Mercer Apr 28 '10 at 18:04

Jeff,

what you're trying to achieve is generally referred to as Aspect Oriented Programming (AOP). Programming using AOP paradigms in C# is not easy - or reliable... yet. There are some capabilities built directly into the CLR and .NET framework that make AOP possible is certain narrow cases. For example, when you derive a class from ContextBoundObject you can use ContextAttribute to inject logic before/after method calls on the CBO instance. You can see examples of how this is done here.

Deriving a CBO class is annoying and restrictive - and there is another alternative. You can use a tool like PostSharp to apply AOP to any C# class. PostSharp is far more flexible than CBOs because it essentially rewrites your IL code in a postcompilation step. While this may seem a bit scary, it's very powerful because it allows you to weave in code in almost any way you can imagine. Here's a PostSharp example built on your use scenario:

using PostSharp.Aspects;

[Serializable]
public sealed class JumperAttribute : OnMethodBoundaryAspect
{
  public override void OnEntry(MethodExecutionArgs args) 
  { 
    Jumper.StartJumping();
  }     

  public override void OnExit(MethodExecutionArgs args) 
  { 
    Jumper.EndJumping(); 
  }
}

class SomeClass
{
  [Jumper()]
  public bool SomeFunction()  // StartJumping *magically* called...          
  {
    // do some code...         

  } // EndJumping *magically* called...
}

PostSharp achieves the magic by rewriting the compiled IL code to include instructions to run the code that you've defined in the JumperAttribute class' OnEntry and OnExit methods.

Whether in your case PostSharp/AOP is a better alternative than "repurposing" the using statement is unclear to me. I tend to agree with @Eric Lippert that the using keyword obfuscates important semantics of your code and imposes side-effects and semantic menting to the } symbol at the end of a using block - which is unexpected. But is this any different than applying AOP attributes to your code? They also hide important semantics behind a declarative syntax ... but that's sort of the point of AOP.

One point where I whole-heartedly agree with Eric is that redesigning your code to avoid global state like this (when possible) is probably the best option. Not only does it avoid the problem of enforcing correct usage, but it can also help avoid multithreading challenges in the future - which global state is very susceptible to.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the pointer to PostSharp. And yes, I fully understand, as I stated in my post, that I'm abusing a language feature. I wish there was an easier way to accomplish this, but I'm not using truly global memory - it's more like Start/EndJumping are issuing commands to a remote process. – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 29 '10 at 2:59

I don't actually see this as an abuse of using; I'm using this idiom in different contexts and never had problems... especially given that using is only a syntactic sugar. One way I use it to set a global flag in one of third party libraries I use, so that the change is reverted when finishing operations:

class WithLocale : IDisposable {
    Locale old;
    public WithLocale(Locale x) { old = ThirdParty.Locale; ThirdParty.Locale = x }
    public void Dispose() { ThirdParty.Locale = old }
}

Note you don't need to assign a variable in using clause. This is enough:

using(new WithLocale("jp")) {
    ...
}

I slightly miss C++'s RAII idiom here, where the destructor is always called. using is the closest you can get in C#, I guess.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. I didn't know I didn't need to set a reference j, or even use the "new" keyword!?? – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 27 '10 at 22:21
    
Actually, you do need the new keyword in this case. – Jordão Apr 20 '11 at 17:09

We have done almost exactly what you propose as a way to add method trace logging in our applications. Beats having to make 2 logging calls, one for entering and one for exiting.

share|improve this answer
    
Beautiful. This is what our "jumping" amounts to... tracking when someone has jumped to another part of the app. – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 27 '10 at 22:24

Would having an abstract base class be helpful? A method in the base class could call StartJumping(), the implementation of the abstract method that child classes would implement, and then call EndJumping().

share|improve this answer

I like this style and frequently implement it when I want to guarantee some tear down behaviour: often it is much cleaner to read than a try-finally. I don't think you should bother with declaring and naming the reference j, but I do think you should avoid calling the EndJumping method twice, you should check if it's already been disposed. And with reference to your unmanaged code note: it's a finalizer that's typically implemented for that (although Dispose and SuppressFinalize are typically called to free up the resources sooner.)

share|improve this answer
1  
FWIW - IDisposable.Dispose() should be able to be called multiple times with no side-effects. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Robert Paulson Apr 27 '10 at 22:15
    
Awesome. I didn't know I didn't need to set the reference j. – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 27 '10 at 22:20

I've commented on some of the answers here a bit about what IDisposable is and isn't, but I will reiterate the point that IDisposable is to enable deterministic cleanup, but does not guarantee deterministic cleanup. i.e. It's not guaranteed to be called, and only somewhat guaranteed when paired with a using block.

// despite being IDisposable, Dispose() isn't guaranteed.
Jumper j = new Jumper();

Now, I'm not going to comment on your use of using because Eric Lippert did a far better job of it.

If you do have an IDisposable class without requiring a finalizer, a pattern I've seen for detecting when people forget to call Dispose() is to add a finalizer that's conditionally compiled in DEBUG builds so that you can log something whenever your finalizer is called.

A realistic example is a class that's encapsulates writing to a file in some special way. Because MyWriter holds a reference to a FileStream which is also IDisposable, we should also implement IDisposable to be polite.

public sealed class MyWriter : IDisposable
{
    private System.IO.FileStream _fileStream;
    private bool _isDisposed;

    public MyWriter(string path)
    {
        _fileStream = System.IO.File.Create(path);
    }

#if DEBUG
    ~MyWriter() // Finalizer for DEBUG builds only
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }
#endif

    public void Close()
    {
        ((IDisposable)this).Dispose();
    }

    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing && !_isDisposed)
        {
            // called from IDisposable.Dispose()
            if (_fileStream != null)
                _fileStream.Dispose();

            _isDisposed = true;
        }
        else
        {
            // called from finalizer in a DEBUG build.
            // Log so a developer can fix.
            Console.WriteLine("MyWriter failed to be disposed");
        }
    }

    void IDisposable.Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
#if DEBUG
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
#endif
    }

}

Ouch. That's quite complicated, but this is what people expect when they see IDisposable.

The class doesn't even do anything yet but open a file, but that's what you get with IDisposable, and the logging is extremely simplified.

    public void WriteFoo(string comment)
    {
        if (_isDisposed)
            throw new ObjectDisposedException("MyWriter");

        // logic omitted
    }

Finalizers are expensive, and the MyWriter above doesn't require a finalizer, so there's no point adding one outside of DEBUG builds.

share|improve this answer

With the using pattern I can just use a grep (?<!using.*)new\s+Jumper to find all places where there might be a problem.

With StartJumping I need to manually look at each call to find out if there is a possibility that an exception, return, break, continue, goto etc can cause EndJumping to not be called.

share|improve this answer
  1. I dont think you want to make those methods static
  2. You need to check in the dispose if end jumping has alredy been called.
  3. If I call start jumping again what happens?

You could use a reference counter or a flag to keep track of the state of the 'jumping'. Some people would say IDisposable is only for unmanaged resources but I think this is ok. Otherwise you should make start and end jumping private and use a destructor to go with the constructor.

class Jumper
{
    public Jumper() {   Jumper.StartJumping(); }
    public ~Jumper() {  Jumper.EndJumping(); }

    private void StartJumping() {...}
    public void EndJumping() {...}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback James. The methods are static because it really just sets a flag in a singleton class, and EndJumping is idempotent (just unsets the flag). I could also make the static methods private, so that the ONLY way to call start/end is with the using() clause. If you call start jumping again, you need to have a second end jumping call... nested sets of calls, essentially. – Jeff Meatball Yang Apr 27 '10 at 22:07
2  
If (ab)using IDisposable to meet the OP's requirements is wrong then using a destructor to do it is much, much worse! Besides, unlike IDisposable, the finalisation code won't be called deterministically so this doesn't meet the requirement that you must call "EndJumping()" before you return. – LukeH Apr 27 '10 at 22:15
    
It wouldn't be to-spec if you rely on a destructor for EndJumping; this might only get called much later in the program's lifecycle after more than a couple of garbage collections. – Jono Apr 27 '10 at 22:17
    
IDisposable is not only for unmanaged resources, but this is typical usage. In reality IDisposable is just a guaranteed pattern of being called when paired with a using block. Maintaining resources isn't essential. IDisposable.Dispose() isn't guaranteed to be called and you're not forced to put IDisposable's within using blocks. Finalizers are guaranteed, but totally non-deterministic. Classes with finalizers should implement IDisposable to allow deterministic cleanup. Finalizers are expensive and you should never use them unless you really need to, and know what you're doing. – Robert Paulson Apr 27 '10 at 22:35

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