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I know how to solve the problem by comparing size to an upper bound but I want a conditional that look for an exception. If an exception occur in conditinal, I want to exit.

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class conditionalTest{
        public static void main(String[] args){

                Stack<Integer> numbs=new Stack<Integer>();
                numbs.push(1);
                numbs.push(2);
                for(int count=0,j=0;try{((j=numbs.pop())<999)}catch(Exception e){break;}&&
                                !numbs.isEmpty(); ){
                                System.out.println(j);
                }
                // I waited for 1 to be printed, not 2.

        }
}

Some Errors

javac conditionalTest.java
conditionalTest.java:10: illegal start of expression
            for(int count=0,j=0;try{((j=numbs.pop())<999)}catch(Exception e){break;}&&
                                ^
conditionalTest.java:10: illegal start of expression
            for(int count=0,j=0;try{((j=numbs.pop())<999)}catch(Exception e){break;}&&
                                   ^
share|improve this question
1  
"I know how to solve the problem by comparing size to an upper bound but I want a conditional that look for an exception." No you don't. Just do it conventionally--never expect an exception, always test first if possible. This rule is for readability, usability, speed and sanity. –  Bill K Apr 28 '10 at 0:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You shouldn't use Exception for normal control flow, and you can't use a statement as a loop terminating condition, which needs to be a boolean expression.

In this particular case, it looks like you can use !numbs.isEmpty() && (j=numbs.pop()) < 999. This works because && is short-circuit, and if the left hand is false, it will not evaluate the right hand (which would throw an Exception), since there's no need to: the overall expression is false nonetheless.

This && short-circuit is also taken advantage of in constructs like this:

if (s != null && s.startsWith("prefix")) { ...
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Another approach would be to simply have the try-catch inside the for loop with the for running a set number of times.

Example:

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
try {
// do risky stuff that might not work
    }
catch (Exception e) {
break;
    } // end catch
} // end for loop.

What happens: Either you run out of time (int i gets bigger than 1000 and the loop breaks naturally), OR what you tried didn't work this time so the catch is hit and "break" called (kicks you out of the for loop).

Another way to do this is with a while loop, for example:

int number = 10;
boolean badStuff = false;
while (!badStuff) {
// do stuff you want
   number = number--; // reassign the number to 9, then 8, then 7, and so on.
   if (number = 1) {
     badStuff = true; // or you could skip having a boolean at all and just call break
       }
    } // end while loop

As long as !badStuff is evaluated true (i.e. you declared bad stuff as false, so !badStuff would be true), the loop will continue. Inside the loop you can set "badStuff = true" inside an if statement to control when you exit. Each time the loop runs it will check !badStuff then the if-statement inside the loop. Here badStuff is a boolean (i.e. always true or false), in this case called a "flag" (wave it to trigger a change).

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3  
I think that precisely breaks the good practice of not using exceptions for control flow stated in polygenelubricants answer. Don't you think? –  Edwin Dalorzo Jun 12 '12 at 0:57

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