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What's the most efficient way to calculate the byte length of a character, taking the character encoding into account? The encoding would be only known during runtime. In UTF-8 for example the characters have a variable byte length, so each character needs to be determined individually. As far now I've come up with this:

char c = getCharSomehow();
String encoding = getEncodingSomehow();
// ...
int length = new String(new char[] { c }).getBytes(encoding).length;

But this is clumsy and inefficient in a loop since a new String needs to be created everytime. I can't find other and more efficient ways in the Java API. There's a String#valueOf(char), but according its source it does basically the same as above. I imagine that this can be done with bitwise operations like bit shifting, but that's my weak point and I'm unsure how to take the encoding into account here :)

If you question the need for this, check this topic.


Update: the answer from @Bkkbrad is technically the most efficient:

char c = getCharSomehow();
String encoding = getEncodingSomehow();
CharsetEncoder encoder = Charset.forName(encoding).newEncoder();
// ...
int length = encoder.encode(CharBuffer.wrap(new char[] { c })).limit();

However as @Stephen C pointed out, there are more problems with this. There may for example be combined/surrogate characters which needs to be taken into account as well. But that's another problem which needs to be solved in the step before this step.

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Using the above did you have performance problems? Do you always want to use UTF-8? –  Adam Gent Apr 28 '10 at 1:16
    
The example was indeed a bit misleading, but actually the encoding can only be determined during runtime. I've updated the question. After all, this doesn't look like to be an easy task though. –  BalusC Apr 28 '10 at 1:25
3  
this is completely wrong and so is bkkbrad's answer. It's actually quite frightening to see so many people completely wrong on that one (+1 only to bkail's answer). A Java char does not, I repeat A JAVA CHAR DOES NOT represent a character anymore since Java 1.4 / Unicode 3.1. String.value(char) and wrapping "char"* and whatnots are all methods from the nineties. The world moved on and it's been a very long time that Unicode has more than 65 536 codepoints. Use "int", get "char" out of your mind because Java char is broken beyond repair. ♩ ♩ ♩ ♩ –  SyntaxT3rr0r Apr 28 '10 at 6:30
3  
@Wizard: cool down :) Take a break. –  BalusC Apr 28 '10 at 11:05
    
I added a new solution based on Wizard's pointed criticism. –  Bkkbrad Apr 28 '10 at 11:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use a CharsetEncoder and reuse a CharBuffer as input and a ByteBuffer as output.

On my system, the following code takes 25 seconds to encode 100,000 single characters:

Charset utf8 = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
char[] array = new char[1];
for (int reps = 0; reps < 10000; reps++) {
    for (array[0] = 0; array[0] < 10000; array[0]++) {
        int len = new String(array).getBytes(utf8).length;
    }
}

However, the following code does the same thing in under 4 seconds:

Charset utf8 = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
CharsetEncoder encoder = utf8.newEncoder();
char[] array = new char[1];
CharBuffer input = CharBuffer.wrap(array);
ByteBuffer output = ByteBuffer.allocate(10);
for (int reps = 0; reps < 10000; reps++) {
    for (array[0] = 0; array[0] < 10000; array[0]++) {
        output.clear();
        input.clear();
        encoder.encode(input, output, false);
        int len = output.position();
    }
}

Edit: Why do haters gotta hate?

Here's a solution that reads from a CharBuffer and keeps track of surrogate pairs:

Charset utf8 = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
CharsetEncoder encoder = utf8.newEncoder();
CharBuffer input = //allocate in some way, or pass as parameter
ByteBuffer output = ByteBuffer.allocate(10);

int limit = input.limit();
while(input.position() < limit) {
    output.clear();
    input.mark();
    input.limit(Math.max(input.position() + 2, input.capacity()));
    if (Character.isHighSurrogate(input.get()) && !Character.isLowSurrogate(input.get())) {
        //Malformed surrogate pair; do something!
    }
    input.limit(input.position());
    input.reset();
    encoder.encode(input, output, false);
    int encodedLen = output.position();
}
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1  
Technically, this is the best answer as far (if you replace position() by limit()). This is indeed much efficienter. –  BalusC Apr 28 '10 at 1:51
1  
@Bkkbrad: A Java char is totally inadequate since 1993 or so to represent a Unicode character, when Unicode moved to 1.1 and had more than 65 536 codepoints. The method to use to get a character in Java is String's codePointAt(..) which correctly returns an int. Java char is, well, utterly broken. (200 KLOC codebase here and we're using Java char, well... zero times). –  SyntaxT3rr0r Apr 28 '10 at 6:36
1  
@WizardOfOdds: I added a solution to keep track of surrogate pairs. –  Bkkbrad Apr 28 '10 at 11:29

If you can guarantee that the input is well-formed UTF-8, then there's no reason to find code points at all. One of the strengths of UTF-8 is that you can detect the start of a code point from any position in the string. Simply search backwards until you find a byte such that (b & 0xc0) != 0x80, and you've found another character. Since a UTF-8 encoded code point is always 6 bytes or less, you can copy the intermediate bytes into a fixed-length buffer.

Edit: I forgot to mention, even if you don't go with this strategy, it is not sufficient to use a Java "char" to store arbitrary code points since code point values can exceed 0xffff. You need to store code points in an "int".

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Very good tip. Unfortunately there's likely no 100% guarantee. –  BalusC Apr 28 '10 at 1:04
    
@bkail: +1 to you for you're the only one in this thread to mention that a Java char cannot store arbitrary codepoints and that int should be used instead. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Apr 28 '10 at 6:38

It is possible that an encoding scheme could encode a given character as a variable number of bytes, depending on what comes before and after it in the character sequence. The byte length you get from encoding a single character String is therefore not the whole answer.

(For example, you could theoretically receive a baudot / teletype characters encoded as 4 characters every 3 bytes, or you could theoretically treat a UTF-16 + a stream compressor as an encoding scheme. Yes, it is all a bit implausible, but ...)

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Yes, good point, the surrogate characters has indeed to be taken into account sooner or later. –  BalusC Apr 28 '10 at 0:52

Try Charset.forName("UTF-8").encode("string").limit(); Might be a bit more efficient, maybe not.

share|improve this answer
    
This still require a String as input. –  BalusC Apr 28 '10 at 0:56

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