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With jQuery 1.4.2, I can't figure out how to combine has() with :gt. I'd like to select any <ul> which contains more than 3 <li>s, so here's what I've tried:

$(document).ready(function(){  
  $("ul.collapse:has(li:gt(2))")  
    .each( function() {  
       $(this).css("border", "solid red 1px");  
  });  
});  

This does work with the 1.2.6 jQuery library, but not 1.3.2 or 1.4.2. Why?

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Using Kobi's code : $('ul').has('li:nth-child(3)').css('border', 'solid red 1px'); does work with the 1.4.2 library (though not 1.2.6). I would like to know why I'm seeing such a difference between the different versions of the jQuery library, if anyone knows. Thanks! –  KatieK Apr 29 '10 at 4:55
    
Hello. I don't know why it didn't work. I saw a similar bug with not, but it was claimed to have been fixed. It is probably better if you edited the question or ask a new one; adding a comment doesn't bump it, so it won't get noticed. –  Kobi Apr 29 '10 at 5:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try using nth-child:

$('ul').has('li:nth-child(3)').css('border', 'solid red 1px');

Working Example: http://jsbin.com/opape3

This selector didn't work for some reason: $("ul.collapse:has(li:nth-child(3))")

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Reading the question again, you're probably asking why one worked and the other didn't. –  Kobi Apr 28 '10 at 4:33
    
Yes, thanks, the snippet using nth-child works for me. (And seems simpler, too!) Though, curiously, not with the 1.2.6 library; though I can see nth-child was added in 1.1.4. –  KatieK Apr 29 '10 at 4:52

Try .filter()

$("ul").filter(function(){
    return $(this).find("li").length > 4;
}).each(function(){
    // your code   
});
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