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I got stuck in one problem of finding the missing values in a range and the range is also variable for the successive rows.

input

673 673 673 676 676 680
2667 2667 2668 2670 2671 2674

output should be like this

674 675 677 678 679
2669 2672 2673

This is just one part and the row values can be more also If you need any clarification, please let me know.

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4  
Is this homework? –  Ether Apr 28 '10 at 16:27

12 Answers 12

Pure bash.

Use two subshells and run a diff, then clean up the results.

diff <(cat my_range_with_holes) <(seq 1 1000) | grep '>' | cut -c 3-
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In Python:

def report_missing_numbers(f):
    for line in f:
        numbers = [int(n) for n in line.split()]
        all_numbers = set(range(numbers[0], numbers[-1]))
        missing = all_numbers - set(numbers)
        yield missing

Note: all_numbers is a bit of a lie, since the range excludes the final number, but since that number is guaranteed to be in the set, it doesn't affect the correctness of the algorithm.

Note: I removed the [-1] from my original answer, since int(n) doesn't care about the trailing '\n'.

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+1, I was thinking to write same thing. –  YOU Apr 28 '10 at 8:36
1  
Your code read just one line from the input. btw, file is a built-in name, don't use it as a variable. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 28 '10 at 11:19
    
Good points, @J.F. I've fixed it. Can I have my vote back? –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 28 '10 at 12:13
1  
yes, you can. btw, .split() without arguments doesn't break on accidental double spaces: '1 2'.split() -> ['1', '2'] but '1 2'.split(' ') -> ['1', '', '2']. int() doesn't work on empty strings. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 28 '10 at 14:13
    
Cool! Kind thanks for returning the vote and the tip on split(). Sometime in the dim dark past, I used to know that, but I had forgotten. –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 28 '10 at 22:04

Perl:

use Modern::Perl;

for my $line (<DATA>) {
    chomp $line;
    my @numbers     = split /\s+/, $line;
    my ($min, $max) = (sort { $a <=> $b } @numbers)[0, -1];
    my @missing     = grep { not $_ ~~ @numbers } $min .. $max;
    say join " ", @missing;
}

__DATA__
673 673 673 676 676 680
2667 2667 2668 2670 2671 2674

/I3az/

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Python:

for line in open("inputfile.txt"):
    vals = set(map(int, line.split()))
    minv, maxv = min(vals), max(vals)
    missing = [str(v) for v in xrange(minv + 1, maxv) if v not in vals]
    print " ".join(missing)
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This is working fine, thanks a lot. can u explain a bit if possible. –  manu Apr 28 '10 at 12:56
    
@manu: the code is very linear. Read input (skip duplicates (why?)), convert to integers; get min, max; iterate from min to max, skip values in input, make list of strings out of them; join list to make a single string. –  badp Apr 28 '10 at 13:03
    
@bp: Converting to a set was more for the lookups in the list comprehension than for removing dupes. I admit it's not totally consequent; if there are just a few values, it doesn't really matter; if there are many, one would probably use itertools.imap instead of map. –  balpha Apr 28 '10 at 13:24

Sample code Using Perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @missing;

while(<DATA>) {
    my @data = split (/[ ]/, $_);
    my $i = shift @data;
    foreach (@data) {
        if ($_ != ++$i) {
               push @missing, $i .. $_ - 1;
               $i = $_;
        }
    }
}

print join " ", @missing;

__DATA__
673 673 673 676 676 680
2667 2667 2668 2670 2671 2674

OUTPUT

674 675 677 678 679 2669 2672 2673
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Ruby:

$stdin.each_line do |line|
  numbers = line.scan(/\d+/).map(&:to_i)
  missing = (numbers.min..numbers.max).to_a - numbers
  puts missing.join " "
end

Golf version (79 characters):

puts $stdin.map{|l|n=l.scan(/\d+/).map(&:to_i);((n.min..n.max).to_a-n).join" "}
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Pure Bash:

while read -a line ; do
  firstvalue=${line[0]}
  lastvalue=${line[${#line[@]}-1]}
  output=()
  # prepare the output array
  for (( item=firstvalue; item<=lastvalue; item++ )); do
    output[$item]=1
  done
  # unset array elements with an index from the input set
  for item in ${line[@]}; do
    unset  "output[$item]"
  done
  # echo the remaining indices
  echo -e "${!output[@]}"
done < "$infile"
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Perl oneliner:

perl -anE'($a,$b)=@F[0,-1];$,=" ";@h{@F}=();say grep!exists$h{$_},$a..$b'
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Modification of Marcelo's solution with safe release of file handle in the event of an exception:

with open('myfile.txt') as f:
    numbers = [int(n) for n in f.readline()[:-1].split(' ')]
all_numbers = set(range(numbers[0], numbers[-1]))
missing = all_numbers - set(numbers)

This also avoids using the builtin name file.

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Shell solution using Bash, sort, uniq & jot (Mac OS X):

numbers="673 673 673 676 676 680"
numbers="2667 2667 2668 2670 2671 2674"
sorted=($(IFS=$'\n' echo "${numbers}" | tr " " '\n' | sort -u ))
low=${sorted[0]}
high=${sorted[@]: -1}
( printf "%s\n" "${sorted[@]}"; jot $((${high} - ${low} + 1)) ${low} ${high} ) | sort | uniq -u
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bash solution:
cat file_of_numbers| xargs -n2 seq | sort -nu

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This lists all numbers from min to max, not just the missing ones. –  Lars Haugseth Apr 29 '10 at 8:01

In Perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use 5.010;

for (1..1000) {
    say "I will not ask the internet to do my homework";
}
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Are you thinking to edit your post. –  Space Apr 28 '10 at 9:04
1  
If you think the question is bad, you should vote to close it, not post a silly answer. –  Thomas Wouters Apr 28 '10 at 9:06
    
It might not be homework. This exact problem came up at my job a few months ago when we needed to list which records had gone missing from our DB. –  Nefrubyr Apr 28 '10 at 9:09
    
@all- Thanx a ton, my problem got solved :) This forum is amazing. Jai ho stackoverflow @mscha-well this is not any homework. I was having few gene locus infrmn as hit but was not able to pickup the in between locus. nw I can get it :) –  manu Apr 28 '10 at 12:56
    
@Thomas he has 56 reputation - how can he vote to close it? –  Konerak May 11 '10 at 8:03

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