Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone explain why following code won't compile? At least on g++ 4.2.4.

And more interesting, why it will compile when I cast MEMBER to int?

#include <vector>

class Foo {  
public:  
    static const int MEMBER = 1;  
};

int main(){  
    vector<int> v;  
    v.push_back( Foo::MEMBER );       // undefined reference to `Foo::MEMBER'
    v.push_back( (int) Foo::MEMBER ); // OK  
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
try using < ? –  Evan Teran Nov 7 '08 at 17:52
    
I edited the question to indent the code by four spaces instead of using <pre><code> </code></pre>. This means the angle brackets aren't interpreted as HTML. –  Steve Jessop Nov 7 '08 at 19:03
    
cheers :) 10 character min rule is sometimes annoying ;) –  Pawel Piatkowski Nov 8 '08 at 12:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 128 down vote accepted

You need to actually define the static member somewhere (after the class definition). Try this:

class Foo { /* ... */ };

const int Foo::MEMBER;

int main() { /* ... */ }

That should get rid of the undefined reference.

share|improve this answer
1  
Good point, inline static const integer initialization creates a scoped integer constant which you can't take the address of, and vector takes a reference param. –  Evan Teran Nov 7 '08 at 18:08
6  
This answer only addresses the first part of the question. The second part is much more interesting: Why does adding a NOP cast make it work without requiring the external declaration? –  nobar Feb 1 '11 at 0:48
14  
I just spent a good bit of time figuring out that if the class definition is in a header file, then the allocation of the static variable should be in the implementation file, not the header. –  shanet Jul 14 '12 at 3:06
    
@shanet: Very good point--I should have mentioned that in my answer! –  Drew Hall Jul 14 '12 at 3:10
    
But if I declare it as const, is it not possible for me to change the value of that variable? –  Namratha Nov 27 '12 at 4:57

The problem comes because of an interesting clash of new C++ features and what you're trying to do. First, let's take a look at the push_back signature:

void push_back(const T&)

It's expecting a reference to an object of type T. Under the old system of initialization, such a member exists. For example, the following code compiles just fine:

#include <vector>

class Foo {
public:
    static const int MEMBER;
};

const int Foo::MEMBER = 1; 

int main(){
    std::vector<int> v;
    v.push_back( Foo::MEMBER );       // undefined reference to `Foo::MEMBER'
    v.push_back( (int) Foo::MEMBER ); // OK  
    return 0;
}

This is because there is an actual object somewhere that has that value stored in it. If, however, you switch to the new method of specifying static const members, like you have above, Foo::MEMBER is no longer an object. It is a constant, somewhat akin to:

#define MEMBER 1

But without the headaches of a preprocessor macro (and with type safety). That means that the vector, which is expecting a reference, can't get one.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes complete sense –  Evan Teran Nov 7 '08 at 18:06
    
thanks, that helped... that could qualify for stackoverflow.com/questions/1995113/strangest-language-feature if it isn't there already... –  Andre Holzner Dec 3 '10 at 13:45
1  
Also worth noting that MSVC accepts the non-cast version without complaints. –  Porges Jun 26 '12 at 23:49

The C++ standard requires a definition for your static const member if the definition is somehow needed.

The definition is required, for example if it's address is used. push_back takes its parameter by const reference, and so strictly the compiler needs the address of your member and you need to define it in the namespace.

When you explicitly cast the constant, you're creating a temporary and it's this temporary which is bound to the reference (under special rules in the standard).

This is a really interesting case, and I actually think it's worth raising an issue so that the std be changed to have the same behaviour for your constant member!

Although, in a weird kind of way this could be seen as a legitimate use of the unary '+' operator. Basically the result of the unary + is an rvalue and so the rules for binding of rvalues to const references apply and we don't use the address of our static const member:

v.push_back( +Foo::MEMBER );
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. Yes it's certainly weird that for an object x of type T, the expression "(T) x" can be used to bind a const ref while plain "x" can't. I love your observation about "unary +"! Who would have thought that poor little "unary +" actually had a use... :) –  j_random_hacker May 29 '09 at 10:38
2  
Thinking about the general case... Is there any other type of object in C++ that has the property that it (1) can be used as an lvalue only if it has been defined but (2) can be converted to an rvalue without being defined? –  j_random_hacker May 29 '09 at 10:51
    
Good question, and at least at the moment I cannot think of any other examples. This is probably only here because the committee were mostly just reusing existing syntax. –  Richard Corden May 29 '09 at 12:47

Aaa.h

class Aaa {

protected:

    static Aaa *defaultAaa;

};

Aaa.cpp

// You must define an actual variable in your program for the static members of the classes

static Aaa *Aaa::defaultAaa;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 A short answer –  Dariush Apr 2 at 21:15

No idea why the cast works, but Foo::MEMBER isn't allocated until the first time Foo is loaded, and since you're never loading it, it's never allocated. If you had a reference to a Foo somewhere, it would probably work.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you're answering your own question: The cast works because it creates (a temporary) reference. –  SlashV Nov 30 '11 at 15:43

Regarding the second question: push_ref takes reference as a parameter, and you cannot have a reference to static const memeber of a class/struct. Once you call static_cast, a temporary variable is created. And a reference to this object can be passed, everything works just fine.

Or at least my colleague who resolved this said so.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.