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Howdy, I'm having a bit of an issue runnning a NAnt script that used to properly build my .Net 2.0 based website, when compiling with VS2008 and it's associated tools. I've recently upgraded all the project/solution files to VS2010, and now my build fails with the following error:

[exec] C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\Microsoft.Common.targets(2249,9): error MSB3086: Task could not find "sgen.exe" using the S dkToolsPath "" or the registry key "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A". Make sure the SdkToolsPath is set and the tool exists in the correct processor specific location under the SdkToolsPath and that the Microsoft Windows SDK is installed

Now, I DO have prior versions (.Net 3.5) of the Windows SDK installed on the build server, and the full .Net 4.0 framework is installed, but I've not run across a .Net 4.0 specific version of the Windows SDK.

After a bit of experimentation and research, I finally just setup a new environmental variable "SDKToolsPath" and pointed it to the copy of sgen.exe in my windows 6.0 sdk folder. This generated the same error, but it got me to notice that even though the SDKToolsPath environmental variable IS set (confirmed that I can "echo" it at the command line and it has the expected value), the error message seems to indicated that it's not being read (note the empty quotes).

Most of the information I've found is .Net 3.5 (or earlier) specific. Not much 4.0 related out there yet. Searching for error code MSB3086 generated nothing useful either. Any idea what this might be?

Scott

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Related issue in this post. I posted an answer there as well. stackoverflow.com/questions/1109955/… –  Diego C. May 3 '10 at 14:59

15 Answers 15

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I had to bite the bullet and install VS 2010 on our build server to fix this issue. As far as I can see, there's no 7.0A version of the Windows SDK available anywhere on MSDN. However, installing VS 2010 appears to install it, creating a 7.0A regkey and a 7.0A folder in Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows.

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I prefer not to install Visual Studio 2010 on a server. I prefer Simmo's suggestion below of setting the current Windows SDK to v7.1. WindowsSdkVer.exe is located in C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.1\Setup (assuming it was installed to C:\Program Files). –  Philippe Jul 13 '10 at 0:14
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I have found that if you only install Windows SDK 7.1 and .NET 4.0. MSBuild does not set proper paths to SDK40ToolsPath and SDK35ToolsPath. To fix it, I had to change a few entries in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSBuild\ToolsVersions\4.0: "SDK40ToolsPath"="$(Registry:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Microsoft SDKs\\Windows\\v7.1\\WinSDK-NetFx40Tools-x86@InstallationFolder)" Similarly change "v7.0A" to "v7.1" in SDK35ToolsPath and FrameworkSDKRoot. –  BlueMonkMN Jan 19 '11 at 19:01
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Sheesh -- I ran into the same problem again myself, googled for it and found my own answer! :) Something seems to have reset my change and I guess I have to manually apply it again. –  BlueMonkMN Jul 14 '11 at 13:18
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ARRRGH! The latest .NET 4.0 patches (2011-08-11) overwrote these registry settings! –  Si. Aug 12 '11 at 2:12
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Update on my earlier response. It appears that on 64-bit OSes, it may also be necessary to update similar values in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\MSBuild\ToolsVersions\4.0, and it may be necessary to install the 8.0 SDK or update the values in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSBuild\ToolsVersions\4.0\11.0 and HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\MSBuild\ToolsVersions\4.0\11.0 I did all of the above except installing the 8.0 SDK, and was unable to compile until I (as one batch step) included my updates to all the 4.0\11.0 nodes. –  BlueMonkMN Aug 6 '13 at 19:05

I couldn't face putting Visual Studio on the build server.

The SDK v7.0A is the SDK installed with Visual Studio 2010 (The A indicates this is a VS release). Since then, a newer version has been released. Microsoft Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework AKA v7.1.

I've installed this on my build server. And then via the Windows SDK 7.1 Command Prompt (Start => All Programs => Microsoft Windows SDK 7.1), I set the default version of the SDK to be 7.1.

Steps:

cd Setup

WindowsSdkVer.exe -version:v7.1

Edit to include LordHits' comment: one doesn't need to install the entire SDK. Installing just the ".NET Development/Intellisense and Reference Assemblies" and ".NET Development/Tools" options is enough.

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This worked perfectly for me, combined with copying across the files into C:\Program Files\MSBuild\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v10.0\WebApplications from my VS machine. –  dnolan Jun 2 '10 at 9:49
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Thanks so much for this answer! –  Dan Fitch Jun 16 '10 at 17:50
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I was facing the same problem as the original author and this answer solved it! I did not have to install Visual Studio 2010 on my Build machine. –  SolutionYogi Aug 12 '10 at 8:11
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Also, just to clarify, one doesn't need to install the entire SDK. Installing just the ".NET Development/Intellisense and Reference Assemblies" and ".NET Development/Tools" options is enough. This and copying the files from dnolan's comment. –  LordHits Aug 26 '10 at 16:42
    
Thanks for this solution, it worked perfectly for me on our build server! FYI- for anyone who may be questioning, the build server is Windows Server 2008 x64. –  Adam Weber Jan 5 '11 at 15:31

I've run into the same error but in a different situation: using VS 2010 Express and trying to use Simmo's answer to explicitly set the SDK version - however WindowsSdkVer.exe (version setter tool) seems to not target Express (understandable since it's limited).

I'm using VS 2010 Express on Win 7 Prof. and it always wants to use v7.0A of the Win SDK (which does not have all the needed exes), and it deosn't matter which version I explicitly set as current using WindowsSdkVer.exe (It keeps reporting it set the current version of the SDK but for VS 2008 although though I only have 2010 Ex installed. )

So my cheap workaround was to install v7.0 WIN SDK (or another version like v7.1) and then rename its file system folder to v7.0A - basically I just lied to VS 2010 Express but it works now!

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Cheap workaround or not, it works like a charm. –  Panagiotis Palladinos Mar 29 '13 at 14:21

I encountered a similar issue just recently on our build server.

I copied the 7.0A folder (C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\7.0A) from my computer (which has VS2010 installed) on it to the build server in the same location.

After create the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A. Set InstallationFolder to C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\7.0A.

You can also reference the registry on your machine with VS2010 already installed on it if you are confused about what to do with the registry on the build server.

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For me, Simmo's answer didn't work - this registry hack did though (Win 2K3 SP2). –  FinnNk Sep 26 '11 at 14:18

You don't actually have SDK version 7.0A installed? That's a problem you'll need to fix. Look in the VS2010 install log files to see what went wrong. The SDK should be present in c:\program files\microsoft sdks\windows\7.0a and the listed registry key must be present as well. Running with the 6.0a version of sgen.exe isn't okay, it is bound to use the wrong compiler.

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Remember, this is a build server, so installing the complete VS2010 environment wasn't my first choice. I was unable to find any available download of the Windows SDK 7.0a –  Scott Mayfield Apr 30 '10 at 12:02
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I don't see the problem. Running a build on a machine who's configuration doesn't match the dev machines, that's a problem that will wear you out quickly. –  Hans Passant Apr 30 '10 at 12:21

One of your projects use sgen.exe (Server Generator) to generate web service. you need install SDKs to Build Server or remove Web Service references from the project.

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Or set "Generate serialization assembly: Off" in the Build tab of the web service's project properties. –  samneric Mar 21 at 20:18

Simply pass GenerateSerializationAssemblies parameter with value Off to your MsBuild.

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msbuild.exe /p:GenerateSerializationAssemblies=Off –  Daniel Nov 5 '13 at 23:34
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Or set "Generate serialization assembly: Off" in the Build tab of the web service's project properties. –  samneric Mar 21 at 20:15

I suspect the targets file is overriding the tools path, I had a quick look in this file and is sets the SDKToolsPath to $TargetFrameworkSDKToolsDirectory under some of the targets in there. I don't think you should need to set these in the environment anyway, but they may need fixing in your project files.

Note that according to this page http://nant.sourceforge.net/ Nant does not support .Net 4.0, could this be the real problem?

Sorry, I know this doesn't really answer your question:(

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Correct, NAnt doesn't support the project/solution file formats for VS2010 yet, which is why I'm calling out to MSBuild for the actual compilation step. Will check out the targets file. –  Scott Mayfield Apr 28 '10 at 16:51

Set Sdk40ToolsPath rather than SdkToolsPath to specify a location other than the install directory.

I hit a similar problem with AL.exe because I had just xcopied the tools onto the build machine rather than installing the SDK, so the usual registry keys were missing. I ran a build with diagnostic output (/verbosity:diagnostic) and noticed that there were several SDK tools paths defined: Sdk40ToolsPath, Sdk35ToolsPath and SdkToolsPath. Setting Sdk40ToolsPath to point to the appropriate SDK version's bin folder solved the problem for me.

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I agree with IanS's answer. No need to install new SDK. Just make sure the registry key values SDK35ToolsPath and SDK40ToolPath for MSBuild are pointing to correct registry key values.

In my case my project was targeted for .NET 3.5 and I had to set SDK35ToolsPath for key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSBuild\ToolsVersions\4.0 to $(Registry:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\WinSDKNetFxTools@InstallationFolder). And everything worked.

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We have a winXP build pc, and use Visual Build Pro 6 to build our software. since some of our developers use VS 2010 the project files now contain reference to "tool version 4.0" and from what I can tell, this tells Visual Build it needs to find a sdk7.x somewhere, even though we only build for .NET 3.5. This caused it not to find lc.exe. I tried to fool it by pointing all the macros to the 6.0A sdk that came with VS2008 which is installed on the pc, but that did not work.

I eventually got it working by downloading and installing sdk 7.1. I then created a registry key for 7.0A and pointed the install path to the install path of the 7.1 sdk. now it happily finds a compatible "lc.exe" and all the code compiles fine. I have a feeling I will now also be able to compile .NET 4.0 code even though VS2010 is not installed, but I have not tried that yet.

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I had this same issue and had installed Windows SDK 7.0 and Windows SDK 7.1 which neither fixed the issue. The cause of the problem for me was that the offending class library was built with Target Framework of .NET Framework 2.0.

I changed it to .NET Framework 4.0 and worked locally and when checked in the Build server built it successfully.

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ToolsVersion="4.0" does it for me in my MSBuild project:

<Project DefaultTargets="Do" ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
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Besides the registry mods, you may need to change version of the .net sdk your settings set to in Visual Studio.

I was having this problem and decided to check the project debug settings.

Project => Toolbar Properties => Debug Advance Compile Options button

The Target Framework (all configurations) was set to 3.0 which is not on my system.

I changed that to 4.0, then had to restart the project and Visual Studio 2010.

The project then built without errors and ran.

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I made a mistake it's locate at the following. Project => Toolbar Properties => Compile Advance Compile Options button I also created a new project and the new project .net was set to 3.0. So there will be a need to change the default setting as well. Scott A. Tovey –  Scott Tovey Jan 20 '12 at 0:15
    
I found out that when you create a project, at the top of the window there is a drop down list of all the frameworks. Everything is listed regardless of whether it is installed or not. Once you select a framework and create a project from that list, it remains the default until you change it to another framework for a new project. This is a bit reckless, the list should only contain frameworks that are installed on the system. –  Scott Tovey Jan 20 '12 at 0:37

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?familyid=47305CF4-2BEA-43C0-91CD-1B853602DCC5&displaylang=en.

Does this version help?

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No. Visual Studio 2010 Professional or better is listed as a prerequisite. Other answers indicate that installing VS2010 alone will solve the issue. –  Greg Sansom Aug 5 '11 at 6:21

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