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What's the most elegant way to check if the directory a file is going to be written to exists, and if not, create the directory? Here is what I tried:

filename = "/my/directory/filename.txt"
dir = os.path.dirname(filename)

try:
    os.stat(dir)
except:
    os.mkdir(dir)       

f = file(filename)

Update: Somehow, I missed os.path.exists(thanks kanja, Blair, and Douglas) this is what I have now:

def ensure_dir(f):
    d = os.path.dirname(f)
    if not os.path.exists(d):
        os.makedirs(d)

Is there a flag for "open", that makes this happen automatically?

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4  
In general you might need to account for the case where there's no directory in the filename. On my machine dirname('foo.txt') gives '', which doesn't exist and causes makedirs() to fail. –  Brian Hawkins May 26 '10 at 23:30
4  
There is no os.path.mkdir(), only os.mkdir()... –  Henry Hu Dec 29 '12 at 21:20
2  
In python 2.7 os.path.mkdir doesn't exist. It's os.mkdir. –  drevicko Jul 6 '13 at 6:15
    
if the path exists one has not only to check if it is a directory and not a regular file or another object (many answers check this) it is also necessary to check if it is writable (I did not find an answer that checked this) –  miracle173 Feb 19 at 19:52
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9 Answers

up vote 693 down vote accepted

I see two answers with good qualities, each with a small flaw, so I'll give my take on it:

Try os.path.exists, and consider os.makedirs for the creation.

if not os.path.exists(directory):
    os.makedirs(directory)

As noted in comments and elsewhere, there's a race condition - if the directory is created between the os.path.exists and the os.makedirs calls, the os.makedirs will fail with an OSError. Unfortunately, blanket-catching OSError and continuing is not foolproof, as it will ignore a failure to create the directory due to other factors, such as insufficient permissions, full disk, etc.

One option would be to trap the OSError and examine the embedded error code, if one knew what's what (on my OS, 13 seems to indicate that permission is denied, and 17 that the file exists - it's not clear that that's even remotely portable, but is explored in Is there a cross-platform way of getting information from Python’s OSError). Alternatively, there could be a second os.path.exists, but suppose another created the directory after the first check, then removed it before the second one - we could still be fooled.

Depending on the application, the danger of concurrent operations may be more or less than the danger posed by other factors such as file permissions. The developer would have to know more about the particular application being developed and its expected environment before choosing an implementation.

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9  
agreed the try/except solution is better –  Corey Goldberg Nov 7 '08 at 20:07
1  
The race condition is a good point, but the approach in stackoverflow.com/questions/273192/#273208, will mask a failure to create the directory. Don't feel bad for voting down - you don't like the answer. It's what votes are for. –  Blair Conrad Nov 7 '08 at 20:35
3  
Remember that os.path.exists() isn't free. If the normal case is that the directory will be there, then the case where it isn't should be handled as an exception. In other words, try to open and write to your file, catch the OSError exception and, based on errno, do your makedir() and re-try or re-raise. This creates duplication of code unless you wrap the writing in a local method. –  Andrew Nov 28 '11 at 19:10
4  
os.path.exists also returns True for a file. I have posted an answer to address this. –  A-B-B Feb 14 '13 at 17:32
2  
os.mkdirs() can create unintended folders if a path separator is accidentally left out, the current folder is not as expected, a path element contains the path separator. If you use os.mkdir() these bugs will raise an exception, alerting you to their existence. –  drevicko Jul 6 '13 at 6:41
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Using try except and the right error code from errno module gets rid of the race condition and is cross-platform:

import os
import errno

def make_sure_path_exists(path):
    try:
        os.makedirs(path)
    except OSError as exception:
        if exception.errno != errno.EEXIST:
            raise

In other words, we try to create the directories, but if they already exist we ignore the error. On the other hand, any other error gets reported. For example, if you create dir 'a' beforehand and remove all permissions from it, you will get an OSError raised with errno.EACCES (Permission denied, error 13).

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1  
What's the common reason against this? ie: why do people prefer the if statement to the try/except? Is it that try/except is more dangerous if you miss the error? –  isaaclw Apr 13 '12 at 19:46
7  
The accepted answer is actually dangerous because it has a race-condition. It is simpler, though, so if you are unaware of the race-condition, or think it won't apply to you, that would be your obvious first pick. –  Heikki Toivonen May 7 '12 at 18:23
3  
Raising the exception only when exception.errno != errno.EEXIST will unintentionally ignore the case when path exists but is a non-directory object such as a file. The exception should ideally be raised if the path is a non-directory object. –  A-B-B Jan 16 '13 at 17:13
9  
Note that the above code is equivalent to os.makedirs(path,exist_ok=True) –  Navin Feb 9 '13 at 15:36
4  
@Navin The exist_ok parameter was introduced in Python 3.2. It is not present in Python 2.x. I will incorporate it into my answer. –  A-B-B Feb 14 '13 at 17:46
show 2 more comments

Granted.. this question has long since been answered, but I'll throw in my two cents.

I would personally recommend that you use os.path.isdir() to test instead of os.path.exists().

>>> os.path.exists('/tmp/dirname')
True
>>> os.path.exists('/tmp/dirname/filename.etc')
True
>>> os.path.isdir('/tmp/dirname/filename.etc')
False
>>> os.path.isdir('/tmp/fakedirname')
False

If you have:

>>> dir = raw_input(":: ")

And a foolish user inputs:

:: /tmp/dirname/filename.etc

... You're going to end up with a directory named filename.etc when you pass that arg to os.makedirs() if you test with os.path.exists().

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If you use 'isdir' only, won't you still have a problem when you attempt to create the directory and a file with the same name already exists? –  MrWonderful Feb 18 at 20:07
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While a naive solution may first use os.path.isdir followed by os.makedirs, the solution below reverses the order of the two operations. In doing so, it handles the possible race condition and also disambiguates files from directories:

try: 
    os.makedirs(path)
except OSError:
    if not os.path.isdir(path):
        raise

Capturing the exception and using errno is not so useful because OSError: [Errno 17] File exists is raised for both files and directories.


In Python 3.2, an optional exist_ok parameter was introduced to the os.makedirs method. It is not present in Python 2.x up to 2.7. One can therefore use os.makedirs(path, exist_ok=True) in Python 3.2+. The following are the usage notes for this parameter from Python 3.3:

If exists_ok is False (the default), an OSError is raised if the target directory already exists. If exists_ok is True an OSError is still raised if the umask-masked mode is different from the existing mode, on systems where the mode is used. OSError will also be raised if the directory creation fails.

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2  
This answer covers pretty much every special case as far as I can tell. I plan on wrapping this in a "if not os.path.isdir()" though since I expect the directory to exist almost every time and I can avoid the exception that way. –  Charles L. Apr 26 '13 at 5:52
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Check out os.makedirs: (It makes sure the complete path exists.) To handle the fact the directory might exist, catch OSError.

import os
try:
    os.makedirs('./path/to/somewhere')
except OSError:
    pass
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8  
with the try/except, you will mask errors in directory creation, in the case when the directory didn't exist but for some reason you can't make it –  Blair Conrad Nov 7 '08 at 19:09
    
This is the only safe way. –  Ali Afshar Nov 7 '08 at 20:02
1  
OSError will be raised here if the path is an existing file or directory. I have posted an answer to address this. –  A-B-B Jan 16 '13 at 17:33
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Ok, sorry, I made too many comments, I guess I should put it down. It's not totally foolproof though.

import os

dirname = 'create/me'

try:
    os.makedirs(dirname)
except OSError:
    if os.path.exists(dirname):
        # We are nearly safe
        pass
    else:
        # There was an error on creation, so make sure we know about it
        raise

Now as I say, this is not really foolproof, because we have the possiblity of failing to create the directory, and another process creating it during that period. I think I will ask the proper remainder as a question, as to whether the OSError codes can be used cross-platform.

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4  
I would make one change to make this code nearly ideal: Change "if os.path.exists(dirname)" to "if os.path.isdir(dirname)" That way you catch the case where the dir create failed because it already exists as a file. –  Schof Oct 30 '09 at 23:47
1  
I would make one more change. Use "if not os.path.isdir(dirname)". I have posted an answer to address this. –  A-B-B Jan 16 '13 at 17:37
add comment

Try the os.path.exists function

if not os.path.exists(dir):
    os.mkdir(dir)
share|improve this answer
2  
I was going to comment on the question, but do we mean os.mkdir? My python (2.5.2) has no os.path.mkdir.... –  Blair Conrad Nov 7 '08 at 19:01
    
There is no os.path.mkdir() method. os.path module implements some useful functions on pathnames. –  Serge S. May 21 '12 at 15:14
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import os

if not os.path.isfile("test") and not os.path.isdir("test"):
            os.mkdir("test")
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add comment

I used some of these approaches before, but was hoping I've overseen something.

Now I'm using this other:

try:
  os.makedirs(path)
except OSError:
  if not os.path.isdir(path):
     raise

This is also commented in Ali's answer, but I thought it was better to put write it properly down. There's no use in checking if a directory is there if after that call you cannot assure it is there. There's only one thing missing here, and is to check the directory has the required attributes (that is, it was not owned by other user or has a different mode). If that is added, then there's no importance who created the directory, as it's what is expected.

Since The original question never checked this in the first place, I omitted it here as well.

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It's not obvious to me why the answer is not useful. whomever downplay it may be kind and explain? –  estani Dec 4 '13 at 21:35
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