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I've been trying to include a structure called "student" in a student.h file, but I'm not quite sure how to do it.

My student.h file code consists of entirely:

#include<string>
using namespace std;

struct Student;

while the student.cpp file consists of entirely:

#include<string>
using namespace std;

struct Student {
    string lastName, firstName;
    //long list of other strings... just strings though
};

Unfortunately, files that use #include "student.h" come up with numerous errors like

error C2027: use of undefined type 'Student'

error C2079: 'newStudent' uses undefined struct 'Student'  (where newStudent is a function with a `Student` parameter)

error C2228: left of '.lastName' must have class/struct/union 

It appears the compiler (VC++) does not recognize struct Student from "student.h"?

How can I declare struct Student in "student.h" so that I can just #include "student.h" and start using the struct?

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5  
Declaring the whole structure in student.h should have fixed it. What aren't you telling us? –  Mark Ransom Apr 28 '10 at 20:41
4  
Needs homework tag ? –  Paul R Apr 28 '10 at 20:42
    
What are the errors when you put the struct definition in the header? –  Georg Fritzsche Apr 28 '10 at 20:46
    
@Mark Ransom and gf--I think I got the same exact errors... it turned out I needed to put some preprocessor #ifndef statements and stuff like that in the header file –  wrongusername Apr 28 '10 at 20:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You should not place an using directive in an header file, it can give you problems in future.

Also you need an include guard in your header.

EDIT: of course, after having fixed the include guard issue, you also need a complete declaration of student in the header file. As pointed out by others the forward declaration is not sufficient in your case.

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Thanks for telling about the include guard... that fixed it. lol :) –  wrongusername Apr 28 '10 at 20:50
1  
-1. Although those are both true statements, I don't see how either of them would address the error messages reported in the question. –  Rob Kennedy Apr 28 '10 at 21:21
    
@rob It wasn't an answer meant to be accepted ;) I just thought he needed the two advices. I believe that my answer, combined with the others, regarding the forward declaration, solved the problem. –  baol Apr 29 '10 at 15:11
    
I was just about to comment on the "using" directive haha, good eye. –  Jordan LaPrise Jan 28 '14 at 23:59

Your student.h file only forward declares a struct named "Student", it does not define one. This is sufficient if you only refer to it through reference or pointer. However, as soon as you try to use it (including creating one) you will need the full definition of the structure.

In short, move your struct Student { ... }; into the .h file and use the .cpp file for implementation of member functions (which it has none so you don't need a .cpp file).

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Try this new source :

student.h :

#include<string>

using namespace std;

struct Student {
    string lastName, firstName;
    //long list of other strings... just strings though
};

student.cpp :

#include "student.h"

struct Student s1;
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2  
-1 for posting an answer that doesn't compile. "string" in student.h should be "std::string". -1 for lack of explanation. Feed a man a fish ... –  Robᵩ Apr 28 '10 at 21:06
5  
Thanks for the correction !! I'm a newcomer here.. –  Zai Apr 28 '10 at 21:12
4  
Google sent me here with a similar question, and this response was the most helpful. Thank you. –  Justin Feb 6 '13 at 12:20
    
This was great. I am learning too and for me I am using a Class. I had to put the struct outside of the Class{private; public;} declaration. Not very clear in any of these answer. I got there by copy and paste shooting,but before any other method that uses it. Great answer. Thanks –  ppumkin Jun 10 at 18:42

C++, how to declare a struct in a header file:

Put this in a file called main.cpp:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include "student.h"
using namespace std;
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    struct Student s1;
    s1.firstName = "fred"; s1.lastName = "flintstone";
    cout << s1.firstName << " " << s1.lastName << endl;
    return 0;
}

put this in a file named student.h

#ifndef STUDENT_H
#define STUDENT_H

#include<string>
struct Student {
    std::string lastName, firstName;
};

#endif

Compile it and run it, it should produce this output:

s1.firstName = "fred";

Protip:

You should not place a using namespace std; directive in the C++ header file because you may cause silent name clashes between different libraries. To remedy this, use the fully qualified name: std::string foobarstring; instead of including the std namespace with string foobarstring;.

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You've only got a forward declaration for student in the header file; you need to place the struct declaration in the header file, not the .cpp. The method definitions will be in the .cpp (assuming you have any).

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hi @andand why would someone define a structure in a header file? Why not define a class directly? –  Hani Goc Nov 6 '13 at 23:42
    
@HaniGoc, You declare the struct or class methods and members in the header so the class can be used in different places in the program. The class or struct method definitions (i.e. their bodies) are generally placed in .cpp files since if they are included in the header file and that header file is included in multiple .cpp files, the linker will complain of multiple definitions of those methods. The main exception is template definitions... those must be in the header file. That's just the way C++ works. –  andand Nov 7 '13 at 4:36

You can't.

In order to "use" the struct, i.e. to be able to declare objects of that type and to access its internals you need the full definition of the struct. So, it you want to do any of that (and you do, judging by your error messages), you have to place the full definition of the struct type into the header file.

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Okay so three big things I noticed

  1. You need to include the header file in your class file

  2. Never, EVER place a using directive inside of a header or class, rather do something like std::cout << "say stuff";

  3. Structs are completely defined within a header, structs are essentially classes that default to public

Hope this helps!

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