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Is there any difference between Arithmetic + and bitwise OR. In what way this is differing.

uint a = 10;
uint b = 20;

uint  arithmeticresult = a + b;

uint bitwiseOR = a | b;

Both the results are 30.

Edit : Small changes to hide my stupidity.

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oops i forgot my school day lessons (Fundamentals). –  Mohanavel Apr 29 '10 at 5:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

(10 | 20) == 10 + 20 only because the 1-bits do not appear in the same digit.

       1010 = 10
   or 10100 = 20
   ————————
      11110 = 30

However,

    11 = 3        11 = 3
or 110 = 6     + 110 = 6
——————         ——¹——————
   111 = 7      1001 = 9
#   ^             ^
# (1|1==1)      (1+1=2)
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Crystal clear example.... –  Mohanavel Apr 29 '10 at 5:48

Counterexample:

2 + 2 == 4
2 | 2 == 2

Bitwise OR means, for each bit position in both numbers, if one or two bits are on, then the result bit is on. Example:

0b01101001
|
0b01011001
=
0b01111001

(0b is a prefix for binary literals supported in some programming languages)

At the bit level, addition is similar to bitwise OR, except that it carries:

0b01101001
+
0b01011001
=
0b11000010

In your case, 10+20 and 10|20 happen to be the same because 10 (0b1010) and 20 (0b10100) have no 1s in common, meaning no carry happens in addition.

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Try setting a = 230 and b = 120. And you'll observer the difference in results.

The reason is very simple. In the arithmentic addition operation the bit-wise add operation may generate carry bit which is added in the next bit-wise addition on the bit-pair available on the subsequent position. But in case of bit wise OR it just performs ORing which never generates a carry bit.

The fact that you're getting same result in your case is that the numbers co-incidentally don't generate any carry-bit during addition.

Bit-wise arithmetic Addition

alt text

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+1 for the pretty animation. –  Joey Adams Apr 29 '10 at 5:49
    
I think small is a poor way of expressing the problem. You can come up with trivially large examples which have the same problem. Let n be any "large enough" number to satisfy your "it's no longer small" criteria. Then compare the bitwise-or and arithmetic add values of shifting 1 by n and (n-1). See my point? I think the important bit is that the binary representation of the numbers chosen were not sufficiently varied. That said the animated gif was awesome. :) –  Rob Rolnick Apr 29 '10 at 5:54
    
completely agree with you. Updated my answer. –  this. __curious_geek Apr 29 '10 at 5:58
    
Where did you get that animation from? –  helpermethod Apr 29 '10 at 8:08
    
plug-n-play :) - is.wayne.edu/drbowen/casw01/AnimAdd.htm –  this. __curious_geek Apr 29 '10 at 8:14

Bitwise OR goes through every bit of two digits and applies the following truth table:

A  B  | A|B
0  0  |  0
0  1  |  1
1  0  |  1
1  1  |  1

Meanwhile the arithmetic + operator actually goes through every bit applying the following table (where c is the carry-in, a and b are the bits of your number, s is the sum and c' is the carry out):

C  A  B  | S  C'
0  0  0  | 0  0
0  0  1  | 1  0
0  1  0  | 1  0
0  1  1  | 0  1
1  0  0  | 1  0
1  0  1  | 0  1
1  1  0  | 0  1
1  1  1  | 1  1

For obvious reasons, the carry-in starts-off being 0.

As you can see, sum is actually a lot more complicated. As a side effect of this, though, there as an easy trick you can do to detect overflow when adding positive signed numbers. More specifically, we expect that a+b >= a|b if that fails then you have an overflow!

The case when the two numbers will be the same is when every time a bit in one of the two numbers is set, the corresponding bit int he second number is NOT set. That is to say that you have three possible states: either both bits aren't set, the bit is set in A but not B, or the bit is set in B but not A. In that case the arithmetic + and the bit-wise or would produce the same result... as would the bitwise xor for that matter.

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Try a = 1 and b = 1 ;) + and | have different when two bits at the same positions are 1

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  00000010

OR

  00000010

Result

  00000010

VS

  00000010

+

  00000010

Result

  00000100
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Sorry I failed to format it nice, I hope you get the idea. –  m0s Apr 29 '10 at 5:45
1  
To format "code", indent 4 spaces. The javascript editor on the site can also do it for you: highlight a few lines, then click on the 01010 button. –  polygenelubricants Apr 29 '10 at 7:12
    
@polygenelubricants Thanks :) –  m0s Apr 29 '10 at 7:19

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