Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running remote audio-file-fetching and audio file playback operations in a background thread using AsyncTask. A Cancellable progress bar is shown for the time the fetch operation runs.

I want to cancel/abort the AsyncTask run when the user cancels (decides against) the operation. What is the ideal way to handle such a case?

share|improve this question
3  
@mghie: thanks for fixing the spelling; AsyncTask makes me dyslexic! –  Samuh Apr 29 '10 at 11:39

8 Answers 8

up vote 54 down vote accepted

Just discovered that AlertDialogs's boolean cancel(...); I've been using everywhere actually does nothing. Great.
So...

public class MyTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {

    private volatile boolean running = true;
    private final ProgressDialog progressDialog;

    public MyTask(Context ctx) {
        progressDialog = gimmeOne(ctx);

        progressDialog.setCancelable(true);
        progressDialog.setOnCancelListener(new OnCancelListener() {
            @Override
            public void onCancel(DialogInterface dialog) {
                // actually could set running = false; right here, but I'll
                // stick to contract.
                cancel(true);
            }
        });

    }

    @Override
    protected void onPreExecute() {
        progressDialog.show();
    }

    @Override
    protected void onCancelled() {
        running = false;
    }

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground(Void... params) {

        while (running) {
            // does the hard work
        }
        return null;
    }

    // ...

}
share|improve this answer
    
additionally I called the cancel method on the AsyncTask –  Samuh May 4 '10 at 8:48
38  
instead of making a boolean flag for running , couldn't you remove it and make this while(!isCanceled())??? –  confucius Feb 28 '12 at 9:06
20  
From docs about onCancelled(): "Runs on the UI thread after cancel(boolean) is invoked and doInBackground(Object[]) has finished." This 'after' means that setting a flag in onCancelled and checking in doInBackground makes no sense. –  lopek Feb 26 '13 at 0:15
    
@lopek,exactly right.this is misleading. –  thecr0w Jun 30 '13 at 8:30
1  
@confucius thats right, but this way background thread doesn't get interrupted, suppose the case when uploading image, the uploading process continues in background and we didn't get onPostExecute called. –  umesh Jan 21 at 13:04

If you're doing computations:

  • You have to check isCancelled() periodically.

If you're doing a HTTP request:

  • Save the instance of your HttpGet or HttpPost somewhere (eg. a public field).
  • After calling cancel, call request.abort(). This will cause IOException be thrown inside your doInBackground.

In my case, I had a connector class which I used in various AsyncTasks. To keep it simple, I added a new abortAllRequests method to that class and called this method directly after calling cancel.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, it works, but how to avoid the exception in this case? –  begiPass Nov 1 '13 at 13:44
    
try/catch it ;-) –  Louis St-Amour Apr 11 at 18:29
    
You must call HttpGet.abort() from a background thread or you'll get a android.os.NetworkOnMainThreadException. –  Heath Borders Apr 29 at 18:40

The thing is that AsyncTask.cancel() call only calls the onCancel function in your task. This is where you want to handle the cancel request.

Here is a small task I use to trigger an update method

private class UpdateTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {

        private boolean running = true;

        @Override
        protected void onCancelled() {
            running = false;
        }

        @Override
        protected void onProgressUpdate(Void... values) {
            super.onProgressUpdate(values);
            onUpdate();
        }

        @Override
        protected Void doInBackground(Void... params) {
             while(running) {
                 publishProgress();
             }
             return null;
        }
     }
share|improve this answer
    
This will work, but logically when you are waiting for server response, and you just did db operation, then is should reflect correct changes to your activity. I wrote a blog on that, see my answer. –  Vikas Aug 3 '11 at 18:17
    
+1 and thank you, your answer worked for me :) –  poovi.org Oct 10 '12 at 5:41

Simple: don't use an AsyncTask. AsyncTask is designed for short operations that end quickly (tens of seconds) and therefore do not need to be canceled. "Audio file playback" does not qualify. You don't even need a background thread for ordinary audio file playback.

share|improve this answer
    
are you suggesting we use regular java thread and "abort" the thread run using volatile boolean variable - the conventional Java way? –  Samuh Apr 29 '10 at 14:57
    
I don't know about volatile -- I tend to use java.util.concurrent objects for that sort of thing. –  CommonsWare Apr 29 '10 at 16:31
20  
No offense Mike, but that's not an acceptable answer. AsyncTask has a cancel method, and it should work. As far as I can tell, it doesn't - but even if I'm doing it wrong, then there should be a right way to cancel a task. The method wouldn't exist otherwise. And even short tasks may need canceling - I have an Activity where it begins an AsyncTask immediately upon loading, and if the user hits back immediately after opening the task, they'll see a Force Close a second later when the task finishes but no context exists for it to use in its onPostExecute. –  Konklone Jul 27 '10 at 3:01
5  
@Klondike: I have no idea who "Mike" is. "but that's not an acceptable answer" -- you are welcome to your opinion. "AsyncTask has a cancel method, and it should work." -- canceling threads in Java has been a problem for ~15 years. It has nothing much to do with Android. With respect to your "Force Close" scenario, that can be solved by a boolean variable, which you test in onPostExecute() to see whether you should go ahead with the work. –  CommonsWare Jul 27 '10 at 3:29
7  
You are supposed to check the isCancelled method periodically in your doInBackground on AsyncTask. It's right there in the docs: developer.android.com/reference/android/os/… –  Christopher Perry Nov 17 '11 at 1:33

The only way to do it is by checking the value of the isCancelled() method and stopping playback when it returns true.

share|improve this answer

This is how I write my AsyncTask
the key point is add Thread.sleep(1);

@Override   protected Integer doInBackground(String... params) {

        Log.d(TAG, PRE + "url:" + params[0]);
        Log.d(TAG, PRE + "file name:" + params[1]);
        downloadPath = params[1];

        int returnCode = SUCCESS;
        FileOutputStream fos = null;
        try {
            URL url = new URL(params[0]);
            File file = new File(params[1]);
            fos = new FileOutputStream(file);

            long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            URLConnection ucon = url.openConnection();
            InputStream is = ucon.getInputStream();
            BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(is);

            byte[] data = new byte[10240]; 
            int nFinishSize = 0;
            while( bis.read(data, 0, 10240) != -1){
                fos.write(data, 0, 10240);
                nFinishSize += 10240;
                **Thread.sleep( 1 ); // this make cancel method work**
                this.publishProgress(nFinishSize);
            }              
            data = null;    
            Log.d(TAG, "download ready in"
                  + ((System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime) / 1000)
                  + " sec");

        } catch (IOException e) {
                Log.d(TAG, PRE + "Error: " + e);
                returnCode = FAIL;
        } catch (Exception e){
                 e.printStackTrace();           
        } finally{
            try {
                if(fos != null)
                    fos.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                Log.d(TAG, PRE + "Error: " + e);
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        return returnCode;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I found that simply calling cancel(true) on the async task and checking isCancelled() periodically does work, but depending on what your task is doing, can take up to 60 seconds before it gets interupted. Adding the Thread.sleep(1) enables it to get interupted immediately. (Async Task goes into a Wait state rather and isn't discarded immediately). Thanks for this. –  John J Smith Oct 9 at 19:31

Our global AsyncTask class variable

LongOperation LongOperationOdeme = new LongOperation();

And KEYCODE_BACK action which interrupt AsyncTask

   @Override
    public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
        if (keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK) {
            LongOperationOdeme.cancel(true);
        }
        return super.onKeyDown(keyCode, event);
    }

It works for me.

share|improve this answer

I don't like to force interrupt my async tasks with cancel(true) unnecessarily because they may have resources to be freed, such as closing sockets or file streams, writing data to the local database etc. On the other hand, I have faced situations in which the async task refuses to finish itself part of the time, for example sometimes when the main activity is being closed and I request the async task to finish from inside the activity's onPause() method. So it's not a matter of simply calling running = false. I have to go for a mixed solution: both call running = false, then giving the async task a few milliseconds to finish, and then call either cancel(false) or cancel(true).

if (backgroundTask != null) {
    backgroundTask.requestTermination();
    try {
        Thread.sleep((int)(0.5 * 1000));
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    if (backgroundTask.getStatus() != AsyncTask.Status.FINISHED) {
        backgroundTask.cancel(false);
    }
    backgroundTask = null;
}

As a side result, after doInBackground() finishes, sometimes the onCancelled() method is called, and sometimes onPostExecute(). But at least the async task termination is guaranteed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.