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I have a simple package class which is overloaded so I can output package data simply with cout << packagename. I also have two data types, name which is a string and shipping cost with a double.

protected:
    string name;
    string address;
    double weight;
    double shippingcost;

ostream &operator<<( ostream &output, const Package &package )
{
    output << "Package Information ---------------";
    output << "Recipient: " << package.name << endl;
    output << "Shipping Cost (including any applicable fees): " << package.shippingcost;

The problem is occurring with the 4th line (output << "Recipient:...). I'm receiving the error "no operator "<<" matches these operands". However, line 5 is fine.

I'm guessing this has to do with the data type being a string for the package name. Any ideas?

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are you using std::string or some other string library? –  KillianDS Apr 29 '10 at 6:33
    
Using string.h #include <string.h> It's in both my .h and .cpp file for this class. Also using namespace std (although that should be clear by the other lines working). –  BSchlinker Apr 29 '10 at 6:35
4  
Use <string> - <string.h> is non-standard and may do weird stuff. Same goes for <iostream> etc. –  Georg Fritzsche Apr 29 '10 at 6:38
2  
Have you tried including #include <string> instead ? –  Jérôme Apr 29 '10 at 6:43
    
@gf: I think string.h is standard. It is not however the .h version of string, but the .h version of cstring, to be compatible with C. –  KillianDS Apr 29 '10 at 6:49
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You must be including a wrong string header. <string.h> and <string> are two completely different standard headers.

#include <string.h> //or in C++ <cstring>

That's for functions of C-style null-terminated char arrays (like strcpy, strcmp etc). cstring reference

#include <string>

That's for std::string. string reference

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You are likely missing #include <string>.

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I had #include <string.h> instead of #include <string>. –  BSchlinker Apr 29 '10 at 7:34
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Try declaring operator<< as a friend in your class declaration:

struct Package
{
public:
    // Declare {external} function "operator<<" as a friend
    // to give it access to the members.
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const Package& p);

protected:
    string name;
    string address;
    double weight;
    double shippingcost;
};

std::ostream&
operator<<(std::ostream& output, const Package& package)
{
    output << "Package Information ---------------";
    output << "Recipient: " << package.name << endl;
    output << "Shipping Cost (including any applicable fees): " << package.shippingcost;
    return output;
}

By the way, it is very bad form to use variable names that have the same name as the data type, excepting different case. This wreaks havoc with search and analysis tools. Also, typos can have some fun side-effects too.

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I don't agree that variable names shouldn't be named the same as the class, indeed, if it's an instance of the class it's a perfectly fine name! What search and analysis tools are there that don't accept the fact that most programming languages are case sensitive? –  dash-tom-bang Apr 29 '10 at 21:00
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use this to output the string..

output << "Recipient: " << package.name.c_str() << endl;

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3  
No, that shouldn't be neccessary - overloads for std::string are provided by the standard library. –  Georg Fritzsche Apr 29 '10 at 6:49
    
You actually don't need c_str() unless you want a char*, possibly to pass it to a C-style function (e.g. printf). -1 –  xtofl Apr 29 '10 at 6:51
    
Got it! Sorry didn't know this. Thanks! –  Jujjuru Apr 29 '10 at 6:58
    
But- something like this could/would highlight if the OP didn't have the string definition that was intended. –  dash-tom-bang Apr 29 '10 at 21:00
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