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I found this in Mail::IMAPClient. Where does the $_ in $SEARCH_KEYS{ uc($_) } come from?

sub _quote_search {
    my ( $self, @args ) = @_;
    my @ret;
    foreach my $v (@args) {
        if ( ref($v) eq "SCALAR" ) {
            push( @ret, $$v );
        }
        elsif ( exists $SEARCH_KEYS{ uc($_) } ) {
            push( @ret, $v );
        }
        elsif ( @args == 1 ) {
            push( @ret, $v );    # <3.17 compat: caller responsible for quoting
        }
        else {
            push( @ret, $self->Quote($v) );
        }
    }
    return @ret;
}
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Looks like that should be $v. Sometimes what you see are bugs. :) –  brian d foy Apr 29 '10 at 16:08
2  
Because 8 out of 10 bugs that I find at the end are no bugs I am a little cautious. –  sid_com Apr 29 '10 at 18:13
    
Still leaves the 2/10 that are :) –  Robert P Apr 29 '10 at 18:56
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That looks to me like a typo where the author converted an anonymous for loop foreach (@args) to one with an explicit iterator variable foreach my $v (@args) and forgot to convert all the incidences of $_ to $v.

You should probably file a bug against the distribution on CPAN.

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2  
I wrote a report. –  sid_com Apr 29 '10 at 18:18
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Even though this is probably a bug, lets consider how this code behaves.

The value of $_ will be determined by the current dynamic scope. What this means is that $_ will have whatever value (the dynamically scoped copy of) $_ has in the calling subroutine.

So for example if I have:

for (1 .. 5 ) {
    foo();
    bar();
}

sub foo {
     print "\$_ = $_\n";
}

sub bar {

    for ( 'a' .. 'c' ) {
        foo();
    }
}

You get output like:

$_ = 1
$_ = a
$_ = b
$_ = c
$_ = 2
$_ = a
$_ = b
$_ = c
...

It gets a little weirder in Perl 5.10 and up, where a lexical $_ exists.

for (1 .. 5 ) {
    foo();
    bar();
}

sub foo {
     print "\$_ = $_\n";
}

sub bar {
    my $_;
    for ( 'a' .. 'c' ) {
        foo();
    }
}

Run this and get:

$_ = 1
$_ = 1
$_ = 1
$_ = 1
$_ = 2
$_ = 2
$_ = 2
$_ = 2

As you can see, if this isn't a bug, it's probably a bad idea.

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@daotoad => have you found any good uses for lexical $_? –  Eric Strom Apr 30 '10 at 21:16
    
Does the lexicaliced $_ keep the value? This doesn't work: $_ = 10; { my $_; say; } –  sid_com May 1 '10 at 7:04
    
Ok, maybe it's the foo, that keeps the value. –  sid_com May 1 '10 at 7:06
    
@Eric, not really, but 99% of my work needs to be Perl 5.8 compatible. It is important to consider when looking at the posted code. –  daotoad May 1 '10 at 18:39
    
@sid, $_ is a global variable that gets a new dynamic scope (like you get via local) in each for loop. So foo() is just printing whatever value is in what $_ points to at the time it is called. bar localizes $_, and so it now points to a different value. Take a look at Coping With Scoping. It goes into detail on how dynamic scoping works. perl.plover.com/FAQs/… –  daotoad May 1 '10 at 18:43
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