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I was looking though a fellow developers code when I saw this ..

for (;;){
   ....
   ....
   ....
}

I have never seen ";;" used in a loop. What does this do exactly?

share|improve this question
7  
fyi, this structure isn't unique to perl; I'd bet most languages with a for(initialize;test;update){} structure support having any of those fields empty. – Carl Apr 29 '10 at 13:23
1  
A more useful question for searching would be "What does for (;;) do" – David Sykes Apr 29 '10 at 14:46
1  
Elementary perhaps, but unorthodox because it isn't clear what it does at a glance. The pattern is such that there should be things between the semi-colons, but since there are none, the double semi-colon looks like something special. As others have said, while(true) is much clearer than (;;). – Pretzel Apr 29 '10 at 16:11
4  
@Viet: you answered your own question. It's elementary, so many people can understand it and probably tripped over it in the past; and many people can answer it. – Alex Feinman Apr 29 '10 at 16:16
2  
Alex has it right. The system does not reward posting and answering complicated and involved questions. People do not vote on things they do not understand, so there is an extreme bias towards elementary things. – Svante Apr 29 '10 at 18:34
up vote 26 down vote accepted

It loops forever. ';;' equates to no start value, no stop condition and no increment condition.

It is equivalent to

while (true)
{
   ...
}

There would usually be a conditional break; statement somewhere in the body of the loop unless it is something like a system idle loop or message pump.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thanks Mitch! Now that I view it as "loops forever because of no specified parameters" it makes perfect sense. – Ben Baraga Apr 29 '10 at 13:24
3  
The note on infinite loops in "Learning Perl" notes that although the for form is the idiomatic one in Perl is the while form (they recommend while(1) ). – HerbN Apr 29 '10 at 14:02
3  
@Ben: if you liked that, check out the --> operator, as in while ($x --> 0) { ... }. – Ether Apr 29 '10 at 15:31
2  
@Ether - It's not nice to play tricks on future programmers with the parser. ;) I had to play with the RHS of the condition for a sec to make sure I understood what that was doing, as I don't think I'd seen that before in perl5. +1 for making me think. – kbenson Apr 29 '10 at 19:15

All 3 parts are optional. An empty loop initialization and update is a noop. An empty terminating condition is an implicit true. It's essentially the same as

while (true) {
   //...
}

Note that you it doesn't have to be all-or-nothing; you can have some part and not others.

for (init; cond; ) {
  //...
}

for (; cond; update) {
  //...
}

for (init; ; update) {
  //...
}
share|improve this answer

Just like in C, the for loop has three sections:

  • a pre-loop section, which executes before the loop starts.
  • a continuing condition section which, while true, will keep the loop going.
  • a post-iteration section which is executed after each iteration of the loop body.

For example:

for (i = 1, acc = 0; i <= 10; i++)
    acc += i;

will add up the numbers from 1 to 10 inclusive (in C and, assuming you use Perl syntax like $i and braces, in Perl as well).

However, nothing requires that the sections actually contain anything and, if the condition is missing, it's assumed to be true.

So the for(;;) loop basically just means: don't do any loop setup, loop forever (breaks notwithstanding) and don't do any iteration-specific processing. In other words, it's an infinite loop.

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Infinite loop. A lot of the time it will be used in a thread to do some work.

    boolean exit = false;

    for(;;) {
        if(exit) {
            break;
        }
        // do some work
    }
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Infinite Loop (until you break out of it).

It's often used in place of:

while(true) { // Do something }
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1  
Sounds like a bad idea to use in instead of while(true) { ... }. It only confuses noobs. – Hamish Grubijan Apr 29 '10 at 13:18
3  
For those of us who come from C++ using VS, while(true) throws up a warning when compiling but for(;;) does not. Projects that run 0 compiler warnings are forced to use for(;;) and it carries over when you switch languages. – tloach Apr 29 '10 at 13:28
    
0 warnings? Damn! – Hamish Grubijan Apr 29 '10 at 17:59

It's the same as

while(true) {
   ...
}

It loops forever.

You don't need to specify all of the parts of a for loop. For example the following loop (which contains no body, or update token) will perform a linear search of myArray

for($index = -1; $myArray[++$index] != $target;);
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