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I am designing a RESTful API for a booking application. You can request a list of accommodations. And that's where I don't really know how to design the JSON represenation. This is my XML representation:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<accommodations>
    <accommodation>
        <name>...</name>
        <category>couch</category>
    </accommodation>
    <accommodation>
        <name>...</name>
        <category>room</category>
    </accommodation>
<accommodations>

My first try to convert this to JSON resulted in this output (1):

{
    "0": {
        "name": "...",
        "category": "couch"
    },
    "1": {
        "name": "...",
        "category": "room"
    }
}

But as I looked how others APIs did it, I found something looking more like this (2):

[
    {
        "name": "...",
        "category": "couch" 
    },
    {
        "name": "...",
        "category": "room" 
    }
]

I know version 1 is an object, and version 2 an array.

But which one is better in this case?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could model the JSON as follows:

{
  "accomodations" : [
    {
      "accomodation" : {
        "name": "...",
        "category": "couch",
        "uri": "http://example.org/accomodations/accomodation_1"
      }
    },
    {
      "accomodation": {
        "name": "...",
        "category": "room",
        "uri": "http://example.org/accomodations/accomodation_2"
      }
    }
  ]
}

and you could return this on a GET http://example.org/accomodations Creating a new accomodation could then be done through a POST http://example.org/accomodations with something like the following in the body:

{
  "accomodation": {
    "name": "...",
    "category": "room"
  }
}
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1  
Thanks, I've seen this several times in other APIs. But isn't this the same thing twice? I request "accommodations" (btw: really with 2 m) and get a list - of accommodations of course. Why repeat this? Or is there a technical reason? –  Jan P. Apr 29 '10 at 18:58
    
Returning an object instead of an array would make it easier for you if you would later need to add fields to it. Say for instance you want to filter on accommodations from a certain hotel through a query parameter, e.g.: GET /accommodations?owner=Hilton you might want to include an address of the owner like this: { "accomodations" : [ /* accomodations here */ ], "owner" : "Hilton", "address" : "Party Street 123", } as you already were returning an object, existing clients don't break. I you were returning an array, existing clients would need to adapted. –  dafmetal Apr 29 '10 at 19:19
    
Okay, working one day with this style made it clear that it's also easier to nest lists. When you start to, for example, include a list of attributes for a accommodation you have to switch to this approach anyway, so why not use it on the main list, too. It's much more unified this way. –  Jan P. Apr 30 '10 at 14:25
    
I don't see much point in repeating that "accomodation"; why not just leave out? It's still a JSON Object (within JSON Array), extensible. –  StaxMan Jul 10 '11 at 17:43
    
This is really not JSON. This is an XMLification of JSON. It only give your developers a hard time making sense of what their parses will return to them (Hash maps of hash maps instead of a list one hash map per object). –  Mohamed Oct 10 '12 at 22:51

If you are going to use the key (1, 2, ...) as the identifier in communications back to the server the dictionary is better, otherwise I'd go for the array. The unique id then is probably a field in an entry.

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Stick with number 2.

Don't model your JSON output after your XML version.

Every major API out there uses representations with Arrays. Most parsing libraries will return List-like instances that make it very easy to manipulate all the objects they contain.

Number 1 is valid JSON but, it's not what the vast majority of your developers will be expecting.

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