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I am using Django for a project and is already in production.

In the production environment 500.html is rendered whenever a server error occurs.

How do I test the rendering of 500.html in dev environment? Or how do I render 500.html in dev, if I turn-off debug I still get the errors and not 500.html

background: I include some page elements based on a page and some are missing when 500.html is called and want to debug it in dev environment.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

I prefer not to turn DEBUG off. Instead I put the following snippet in the urls.py:

if settings.DEBUG:
    urlpatterns += patterns('',
        (r'^500/$', 'your_custom_view_if_you_wrote_one'),
        (r'^404/$', 'django.views.generic.simple.direct_to_template', {'template': '404.html'}),
    )

In the snippet above, the error page uses a custom view, you can easily replace it with Django's direct_to_template view though.

Now you can test 500 and 404 pages by calling their urls: http://example.com/500 and http://example.com/404

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Perfect. Answers my question about testing my 500 (as well as 404). Thx. –  lud0h Apr 30 '10 at 14:36
1  
This is useful if you merely want to see what they look like, but make no mistake that this is not "testing" the http error codes in your app. –  commadelimited Jul 25 '13 at 21:31

And if you want to use the default Django 500 view instead of your custom view:

if settings.DEBUG:
    urlpatterns += patterns('',
        (r'^500/$', 'django.views.defaults.server_error'),
        (r'^404/$', 'django.views.generic.simple.direct_to_template', {'template': '404.html'}),
    )
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In Django 1.6 django.views.generic.simple.direct_to_template does not exists anymore, these are my settings for special views:

urlpatterns += patterns(
        '',
        url(r'^400/$', TemplateView.as_view(template_name='400.html')),
        url(r'^403/$', TemplateView.as_view(template_name='403.html')),
        url(r'^404/$', 'django.views.defaults.page_not_found'),
        url(r'^500/$', 'django.views.defaults.server_error'),
    )
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Continuing shanyu's answer, in Django 1.3+ use:

if settings.DEBUG:
    urlpatterns += patterns('',
        (r'^500/$', 'django.views.defaults.server_error'),
        (r'^404/$', 'django.views.defaults.page_not_found'),
    )
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this works for me using django 1.6 –  pymarco Jan 17 '14 at 18:37
    
Works in django 1.4. (With debug=True) –  Ryu_hayabusa Feb 4 '14 at 11:59

Are both debug settings false?

settings.DEBUG = False
settings.TEMPLATE_DEBUG = False
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yes they are... –  lud0h Apr 29 '10 at 19:12
1  
Are you sure you don't have multiple settings files that may override one another? –  hora Apr 29 '10 at 20:09
    
I was mistaken about multiple settings and I still get the template debug message. –  lud0h Apr 30 '10 at 7:37

You can simply define the handler404 and handler500 for errors in your main views.py file as detailed in this answer:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/18009660/1913888

This will return the error that you desire when Django routes to that handler. No custom URL configuration is needed to route to a different URL name.

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