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How do you detect when a HTML5 <video> element has finished playing? I found a spec mentioning an ended event, but I don't really know how to interact with it.

Thanks!

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8 Answers 8

up vote 68 down vote accepted

Have a look at this Everything You Need to Know About HTML5 Video and Audio post at the Opera Dev site under the "I want to roll my own controls" section.

This is the pertinent section:

<video src="video.ogv">
     video not supported
</video>

then you can use:

<script>
    var video = document.getElementsByTagName('video')[0];

    video.onended = function(e) {
      /*Do things here!*/
    };
</script>

onended is a HTML5 standard event on all media elements, see the HTML5 media element (video/audio) events documentation.

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Is that browser specific? –  UltimateBrent Apr 30 '10 at 21:06
    
I've update my answer with more info. –  Alastair Pitts May 1 '10 at 3:00
    
Thanks! That should do it! –  UltimateBrent May 3 '10 at 18:22
2  
I've tried to catch "ended" event exactly the same way, as you presented, but this event is not firing. I'm under Safari 5.0.4 (6533.20.27) –  AntonAL Apr 11 '11 at 15:25
4  
@AlastairPitts This is not valid on Chrome. Darkroro's answer is the only way I got it to work with Chrome. This still worked on Firefox. –  Jeff May 30 '13 at 19:21

You can add an event listener with 'ended' as first param

Like this :

<video src="video.ogv" id="myVideo">
  video not supported
</video>

<script type='text/javascript'>
    document.getElementById('myVideo').addEventListener('ended',myHandler,false);
    function myHandler(e) {
        if(!e) { e = window.event; }
        // What you want to do after the event
    }
</script>
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3  
This is the only video."on end" event which works in the whole internet. Bravo! –  Isaac Jun 8 '12 at 15:36
6  
Why do you check if e exists? –  Allan Stepps Aug 7 '13 at 0:12
    
Works on Android Chrome in contrast to onended –  Richard Sep 2 at 17:13

JQUERY

$("#video1").bind("ended", function() {
   //TO DO: Your code goes here...
});

HTML

<video id="video1" width="420">
                    <source src="path/filename.mp4" type="video/mp4">
                    Your browser does not support HTML5 video.
</video>

Event types HTML Audio and Video DOM Reference

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Very useful documentation with test page from Apple: http://developer.apple.com/library/safari/#samplecode/HTML5VideoEventFlow/Listings/events_js.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/DTS40010085-events_js-DontLinkElementID_5

All you wanted to know on HTML5 video events!

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1  
great material! –  Santiago Rebella Oct 26 '12 at 13:14

Here is a simple approach which triggers when the video ends.

<html>
<body>

    <video id="myVideo" controls="controls">
        <source src="video.mp4" type="video/mp4">
        etc ...
    </video>

</body>
<script type='text/javascript'>

    document.getElementById('myVideo').addEventListener('ended', function(e) {

        alert('The End');

    }

</script>
</html> 

In the 'EventListener' line substitute the word 'ended' with 'pause' or 'play' to capture those events as well.

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The tag <video> is a media content that have the following attributes.

           attribute float currentTime;
  readonly attribute float startTime;
  readonly attribute float duration;
  readonly attribute boolean paused;
           attribute float defaultPlaybackRate;
           attribute float playbackRate;
  readonly attribute TimeRanges played;
  readonly attribute TimeRanges seekable;
  readonly attribute boolean ended; 
           attribute boolean autoplay;
           attribute boolean loop;
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1  
So there's no event, you just have to poll for the status of ended? –  UltimateBrent Apr 30 '10 at 20:28

What about if the video is not in the DOM?

function privateScopeFunction(){
    var video = document.createElement('video');
    var source= document.createElement('source');
    source.src = somefile;
    video.appendChild(source);
}

document.getElementById returns nothing, but then it would. references to video in JS will fail as it stays in the function's scope...

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Here is a full example, I hope it helps =).

<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html> 
<body> 

<video id="myVideo" controls="controls">
  <source src="your_video_file.mp4" type="video/mp4">
  <source src="your_video_file.mp4" type="video/ogg">
  Your browser does not support HTML5 video.
</video>

<script type='text/javascript'>
    document.getElementById('myVideo').addEventListener('ended',myHandler,false);
    function myHandler(e) {
        if(!e) { e = window.event; }
        alert("Video Finished");
    }
</script>
</body> 
</html>
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protected by Tushar Gupta Oct 20 at 22:23

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