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Is there any way to print a pointer to a function in ANSI C? Of course this means you have to cast the function pointer to void pointer, but it appears that's not possible??

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int (*funcptr)() = main;

    printf("%p\n", (void* )funcptr);
    printf("%p\n", (void* )main);

    return 0;
}

$ gcc -ansi -pedantic -Wall test.c -o test
test.c: In function 'main':
test.c:6: warning: ISO C forbids conversion of function pointer to object pointer type
test.c:7: warning: ISO C forbids conversion of function pointer to object pointer type
$ ./test
0x400518
0x400518

It's "working", but non-standard...

share|improve this question
    
Well, I was about to accept an answer that worked, until it got deleted (although it made no sense). –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Apr 30 '10 at 0:56
    
Can you typecast it to an int (or 64-bit int on larger systems) and print that instead? –  Michael Dorgan Apr 30 '10 at 0:59
    
@Michael Dorgan: Casting a pointer to an integer type other than intptr_t or uintptr_t is implementation-defined, however implementing these types is optional according to the standard. –  dreamlax Apr 30 '10 at 1:00
    
@Longpoke: Sorry for deleting my answer, I wasn't sure whether it would satisfy your compiler flags so I temporarily removed it just in case it wouldn't. –  dreamlax Apr 30 '10 at 1:02
    
What i was looking for was a legal way to do it, and yours seems legal, and the compiler shuts up too, so thanks :) –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Apr 30 '10 at 1:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

The only legal way to do this is to access the bytes making up the pointer using a character type. Like this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int (*funcptr)() = main;
    unsigned char *p = (unsigned char *)&funcptr;
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < sizeof funcptr; i++)
    {
        printf("%02x ", p[i]);
    }
    putchar('\n');

    return 0;
}

Punning the function pointer as a void *, or any non character type, as dreamlax's answer does, is undefined behaviour.

What those bytes making up the function pointer actually mean is implementation-dependent. They could just represent an index into a table of functions, for example.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't it be better to use uintptr_t instead of unsigned char ? As in int (*funcptr)() = main; uintptr_t *p = (uintptr_t *)&funcptr; printf("0x%" PRIxPTR "\n", *p);, avoiding a loop? (Assuming C99 stdint.h and inttypes.h headers are supported.) –  Chris Lutz Apr 30 '10 at 2:14
5  
@Chris: uintptr_t has no relation with function pointers, and is optional. So from the POV of writing something totally portable no, it's not better. –  Steve Jessop Apr 30 '10 at 2:32
1  
caf's answer is correct. It's cute to see dreamlax's undefined code accepted as the answer while correct code languishes here. –  Windows programmer Apr 30 '10 at 4:47
1  
Yeah well this wont be as pretty as %p :( Not to mention endianess and no proper representation on segmented models. –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Apr 30 '10 at 5:18
3  
Unfortunately, until they add a printf format specifier for printing function pointers, it's the best you can do in strictly conforming C. Endianness is a red herring - there's no guarantee that a "function pointer" is any kind of number at all (for example, it might be the first 64 characters of the function name, which is looked up in the symbol table when a call is made using the function pointer). This is why function pointers aren't convertible to and from other pointer types - it's so that the implementation has wide latitude in how it implements them. –  caf Apr 30 '10 at 7:59

There's the use of unions that can get around the warning/error, but the result is still (most likely) undefined behavior:

#include <stdio.h>

int
main (void)
{
  union
  {
    int (*funcptr) (void);
    void *objptr;
  } u;
  u.funcptr = main;

  printf ("%p\n", u.objptr);

  return 0;
}

You can compare two function pointers (e.g. printf ("%i\n", (main == funcptr));) using an if statement to test whether they're equal or not (I know that completely defeats the purpose and could very well be irrelevant), but as far as actually outputting the address of the function pointer, what happens is up to the vendor of your target platform's C library and your compiler.

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Cast the function pointer to an integer, then cast it to a pointer again to use "%p".

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int (*funcptr)() = main;

    printf("%p\n", (void *)(size_t) funcptr);
    printf("%p\n", (void *)(size_t) main);

    return 0;
}

Note that on some platforms (e.g. 16-bit DOS in the "medium" or "compact" memory models), pointers to data and pointers to functions are not the same size.

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Yes, "16-bit DOS" ran on a segmented memory architecture. For example, the 80286 would have a 4-byte void * and 2-byte size_t. –  Judge Maygarden Apr 30 '10 at 13:59

Try this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>


int main() {
    int (*funcptr)() = main;
    unsigned char *p = (unsigned char *)&funcptr;
    int i;

    /* sample output: 00000000004005e0 */
    printf("%016"PRIxPTR"\n", (uintptr_t)main);
    /* sample output: 00000000004005e0 */
    printf("%016"PRIxPTR"\n", (uintptr_t)funcptr);

    /* reflects the fact that this program is running on little-endian machine
    sample output: e0 05 40 00 00 00 00 00 */
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof funcptr; i++)
    {
        printf("%02x ", p[i]);
    }
    putchar('\n');

    return 0;
}

Used this flags:

gcc -ansi -pedantic -Wall -O2 -Wstrict-aliasing c.c

No warnings emitted using those flags

share|improve this answer
    
On a machine where more bytes are needed to store a pointer to a function than a pointer to a UINT, your first two printf's will output truncated information. To get gcc to warn you about casts that potentially truncate (even though maybe not on your machine), maybe you need a flag to warn about potential truncations rather than about aliases. –  Windows programmer Apr 30 '10 at 7:48
    
I think that's the most strictest flag that can be passed to a C compiler. Tomorrow I'll download 32 bit Ubuntu and check if that same codebase will run. I will test also in Visual C++ 2008 if it would run the same –  Michael Buen Apr 30 '10 at 7:54
    
"On a machine where more bytes are needed to store a pointer to a function than a pointer to a UINT" <-- hmm.. (sans the segmented memory of pre-386, where the compiler has three flavor of pointers: near, far, huge(huge is just more of a compiler magic than the real architecture of machine)) i remember in assembly language, there's no variable size pointer, regardless of where it points at (UINT, char, short, function, etc) –  Michael Buen Apr 30 '10 at 8:46
    
A Harvard architecture could have different-sized instruction and data pointers, and that's why C treats them as incompatible. I can't off-hand name a processor which has different sizes (it's much easier in C++, where pointer-to-member usually is a different and often variable size), but I also can't conclude from my own ignorance that there aren't any, and the question is about "in ANSI C", not "in ANSI C on x86". –  Steve Jessop Apr 30 '10 at 23:01
    
hmm.. I read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modified_Harvard_architecture. It's not a Von Neumann machine; it says C was not designed for Hardvard Architecture, so any implementation of C language on that machine will surely be very non-standard, check the footnote. In essence, you cannot make C program that can run on all machine architectures. In Von Neumann architecture, memory can contain both instruction and data, thus have only one address space, hence same pointer size, the runtime can do sort of things like patching its own code during runtime and running runtime-generated instructions –  Michael Buen May 1 '10 at 0:48

With gcc 4.3.4, using switches -O2 -Wstrict-aliasing, dreamlax's answer will produce:

warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer will break strict-aliasing rules

Added: I think the objections to caf's answer about endianness and size are reasonable, which his solution does not address (no pun intended). Dustin's suggestion for using a union cast is probably legal (although from what I read there seems to be some debate, but your compiler does is important than the law). But his code could be simplified (or obfuscated, depending on your taste) by the one-liner:

printf("%p\n", ((union {int (*from)(void); void *to;})funcptr).to);

This removes the gcc strict-aliasing warning (but is it 'correct'?).

Aggregate casts won't 'work' if you are using the -pedantic switch, or are using e.g. SGI IRIX, so you'll need to use:

printf("%p\n", ((union {int (*from)(void); void *to;} *)&funcptr)->to);

But regarding the original question: its origin lies in the use of -pedantic, which I think is slightly pedantic :).

Further edit: Note you cannot use main in the last example, as in:

printf("%p\n", ((union {int (*from)(void); void *to;})   main).to);  // ok
printf("%p\n", ((union {int (*from)(void); void *to;} *)&main)->to); // wrong!

because of course &main decays to main.

share|improve this answer
2  
Useful information, but this doesn't really answer his question, it should have been a comment on my answer as opposed to a separate answer altogether. –  dreamlax Apr 30 '10 at 4:11
    
@dreamlax: Sorry about the separate answer, but I've only 31 stackoverflow points, less than the 50 needed for comments. But I'll convert this answer to a comment ASAP. –  Joseph Quinsey Apr 30 '10 at 5:42
    
@caf: Sorry. I see that you already made this point about dreamlax's answer in your answer. –  Joseph Quinsey May 3 '10 at 16:42

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