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I'm recently working on this platform for which a legacy codebase issues a large number of "cast increases required alignment to N" warnings, where N is the size of the target of the cast.

struct Message
{
   int32_t id;
   int32_t type;
   int8_t  data[16];
};

int32_t GetMessageInt(const Message& m)
{
   return *reinterpret_cast<int32_t*>(&data[0]);
}

Hopefully it's obvious that a "real" implementation would be a bit more complex, but the basic point is that I've got data coming from somewhere, I know that it's aligned (because I need the id and type to be aligned), and yet I get the message that the cast is increasing the alignment, in the example case, to 4.

Now I know that I can suppress the warning with an argument to the compiler, and I know that I can cast the bit inside the parentheses to void* first, but I don't really want to go through every bit of code that needs this sort of manipulation (there's a lot because we load a lot of data off of disk, and that data comes in as char buffers so that we can easily pointer-advance), but can anyone give me any other thoughts on this problem? I mean, to me it seems like such an important and common option that you wouldn't want to warn, and if there is actually the possibility of doing it wrong then suppressing the warning isn't going to help. Finally, can't the compiler know as I do how the object in question is actually aligned in the structure, so it should be able to not worry about the alignment on that particular object unless it got bumped a byte or two?

share|improve this question
    
Is there some sort of pragma/packed directive your compiler supports to let it know the struct is x-byte aligned? – Michael Dorgan Apr 30 '10 at 1:33
    
"this platform", don't make us guess. – Hans Passant Apr 30 '10 at 1:40
    
@Hans- I cannot share specific platform details. @Michael- I can go around and start tagging things as aligned, which I started to do, but the problem is everywhere. The question isn't so much of a "how do I fix it," but rather, "why does the compiler care so much when it has all of the information it needs." E.g. it doesn't warn that I might be dereferencing the other members unaligned... – dash-tom-bang Apr 30 '10 at 1:53
1  
the compiler might know that data is 4-aligned when it compiles this code, but some warnings are there to tell you that your code isn't portable. Admittedly it's unlikely any compiler would fail to put data[0] at the first byte after type, and hence with the same alignment as int32_t, but it's legal. Also, the warning might be dumber than you think, be based solely on the type, and is making no effort to deduce the alignment of struct members. – Steve Jessop Apr 30 '10 at 2:23
up vote 4 down vote accepted

One possible alternative might be:

int32_t GetMessageInt(const Message& m)
{
   int32_t value;
   memcpy(&value, &(data[0]), sizeof(int32_t));
   return value;
}

For x86 architecture, the alignment isn't going to matter that much, it's more a performance issue that isn't really relevant for the code you have provided. For other architectures (eg MIPS) misaligned accesses cause CPU exceptions.


OK, here's another alternative:

struct Message
{
    int32_t id;
    int32_t type;
    union
    {
        int8_t  data[16];
        int32_t data_as_int32[16 * sizeof(int8_t) / sizeof(int32_t)];
        // Others as required
    };
};

int32_t GetMessageInt(const Message& m)
{
    return m.data_as_int32[0];
}

Here's variation on the above that includes the suggestions from cpstubing06:

template <size_t N>
struct Message
{
    int32_t id;
    int32_t type;
    union
    {
        int8_t  data[N];
        int32_t data_as_int32[N * sizeof(int8_t) / sizeof(int32_t)];
        // Others as required
    };
    static_assert((N * sizeof(int8_t) % sizeof(int32_t)) == 0,
                  "N is not a multiple of sizeof(int32_t)");
};

int32_t GetMessageInt(const Message<16>& m)
{
    return m.data_as_int32[0];
}


// Runtime size checks
template <size_t N>
void CheckSize()
{
    assert(sizeof(Message<N>) == N * sizeof(int8_t) + 2 * sizeof(int32_t));
}

void CheckSizes()
{
    CheckSize<8>();
    CheckSize<16>();
    // Others as required
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes- it is a platform that will trigger unaligned read exceptions unless I flag the object as unaligned. I certainly could copy the data but it seems excessive; if I read a file off of disk that fills memory, I want to just say "this is here, this is here, this is here," and not have to be shuffling things around for no actual gain. – dash-tom-bang Apr 30 '10 at 1:55
1  
@dash-tom-bang: it depends on the compiler, of course, but you might get that memcpy for the price of an unaligned (as far as the compiler knows) int32_t read. For instance GCC is quite good at this kind of thing, it can optimise variables into registers even if you take an address, provided you don't pass the address to non-inlined code. – Steve Jessop Apr 30 '10 at 2:26
    
I don't think the copying would make a huge difference if your compiler has a decent memcpy intrinsic. – msandiford Apr 30 '10 at 2:28
1  
I think the correct solution is to use per-compiler directives to insure the alignment you want. However, the OP doesn't seem to want to make the effort, so the union concept is pretty good to get around the warning. For safety's sake, either parameterize the 16 as a const unsigned and then statically assert that it divides evenly by 4 or perhaps templatize that struct and pass the 16 as a template parameter and do the same check. Structs and unions themselves can be padded, so it wouldn't hurt to check that (sizeof(Message) == 2*sizeof(int32_t) + N*sizeof(int8_t)) at compile time as well. – cptstubing06 May 30 '13 at 18:34
    
Note that the union trick is undefined behavior. – GManNickG May 30 '13 at 23:32

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