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How can I find the point B(t) along a cubic Bezier curve that is closest to an arbitrary point P in the plane?

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Here is a good reference with an implementation in basic: tinaja.com/glib/bezdist.pdf – drawnonward Apr 30 '10 at 6:11
    
After looking at the linked PDF, I think I'm looking for something more descriptive -- more like an academic paper. As it is, I'm not sure I understand what the algorithm being described really does. – Adrian Lopez Apr 30 '10 at 16:27
    
Nothing about distance, but this is a fun page to read if you are just interested in bezier curves: redpicture.com/bezier/bezier-01.html – drawnonward Apr 30 '10 at 18:57
up vote 10 down vote accepted

After lots of searching I found a paper that discusses a method for finding the closest point on a Bezier curve to a given point:

Improved Algebraic Algorithm On Point Projection For Bezier Curves, by Xiao-Diao Chen, Yin Zhou, Zhenyu Shu, Hua Su, and Jean-Claude Paul.

Furthermore, I found Wikipedia and MathWorld's descriptions of Sturm sequences useful in understanding the first part of the algoritm, as the paper itself isn't very clear in its own description.

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1  
This looks like a great resource. Have you translated either of the 2 algorithms in there into code that can be shared? – zanlok Sep 11 '13 at 17:16
    
I haven't done so. – Adrian Lopez Nov 4 '13 at 21:22
    
Anyone gotten around to implementing the described algorithm? Or know of an implementation available somewhere? I read the paper, but find some parts of it very terse, such as when the the use of Sturm sequences and continued fractions is described. I'm actually unsure whether the authors used Sturm sequences in the end or not. They also don't describe how they determined the tau parameter when bisecting (Algorithm 1) (the cut-off interval length at which they start using Newton's method). – estan Dec 30 '15 at 10:52

Depending on your tolerances. Brute force and being accepting of error. This algorithm could be wrong for some rare cases. But, in the majority of them it will find a point very close to the right answer and the results will improve the higher you set the slices. It just tries each point along the curve at regular intervals and returns the best one it found.

public double getClosestPointToCubicBezier(double fx, double fy, int slices, double x0, double y0, double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2, double x3, double y3)  {
    double tick = 1d / (double) slices;
    double x;
    double y;
    double t;
    double best = 0;
    double bestDistance = Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
    double currentDistance;
    for (int i = 0; i <= slices; i++) {
        t = i * tick;
        //B(t) = (1-t)**3 p0 + 3(1 - t)**2 t P1 + 3(1-t)t**2 P2 + t**3 P3
        x = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * x0 + 3 * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * t * x1 + 3 * (1 - t) * t * t * x2 + t * t * t * x3;
        y = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * y0 + 3 * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * t * y1 + 3 * (1 - t) * t * t * y2 + t * t * t * y3;

        currentDistance = Point.distanceSq(x,y,fx,fy);
        if (currentDistance < bestDistance) {
            bestDistance = currentDistance;
            best = t;
        }
    }
    return best;
}

You can get a lot better and faster by simply finding the nearest point and recursing around that point.

public double getClosestPointToCubicBezier(double fx, double fy, int slices, int iterations, double x0, double y0, double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2, double x3, double y3) {
    return getClosestPointToCubicBezier(iterations, fx, fy, 0, 1d, slices, x0, y0, x1, y1, x2, y2, x3, y3);
}

private double getClosestPointToCubicBezier(int iterations, double fx, double fy, double start, double end, int slices, double x0, double y0, double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2, double x3, double y3) {
    if (iterations <= 0) return (start + end) / 2;
    double tick = (end - start) / (double) slices;
    double x, y, dx, dy;
    double best = 0;
    double bestDistance = Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
    double currentDistance;
    double t = start;
    while (t <= end) {
        //B(t) = (1-t)**3 p0 + 3(1 - t)**2 t P1 + 3(1-t)t**2 P2 + t**3 P3
        x = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * x0 + 3 * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * t * x1 + 3 * (1 - t) * t * t * x2 + t * t * t * x3;
        y = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * y0 + 3 * (1 - t) * (1 - t) * t * y1 + 3 * (1 - t) * t * t * y2 + t * t * t * y3;


        dx = x - fx;
        dy = y - fy;
        dx *= dx;
        dy *= dy;
        currentDistance = dx + dy;
        if (currentDistance < bestDistance) {
            bestDistance = currentDistance;
            best = t;
        }
        t += tick;
    }
    return getClosestPointToCubicBezier(iterations - 1, fx, fy, Math.max(best - tick, 0d), Math.min(best + tick, 1d), slices, x0, y0, x1, y1, x2, y2, x3, y3);
}

In both cases you can do the quad just as easily:

x = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * x0 + 2 * (1 - t) * t * x1 + t * t * x2; //quad.
y = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * y0 + 2 * (1 - t) * t * y1 + t * t * y2; //quad.

By switching out the equation there.

While the accepted answer is right, and you really can figure out the roots and compare that stuff. If you really just need to find the nearest point on the curve, this will do it.

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