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In other words:

Can an object referenced by a local variable be reclaimed before the variable goes out of scope (eg. because the variable is assigned, but then not used again), or is that object guaranteed to be ineligible for garbage collection until the variable goes out of scope?

Let me explain:


void Case_1()
{
    var weakRef = new WeakReference(new object());

    GC.Collect();  // <-- doesn't have to be an explicit call; just assume that
                   //     garbage collection would occur at this point.

    if (weakRef.IsAlive) ...
}

In this code example, I obviously have to plan for the possibility that the new'ed object is reclaimed by the garbage collector; therefore the if statement.

(Note that I'm using weakRef for the sole purpose of checking if the new'ed object is still around.)


void Case_2()
{
    var unusedLocalVar = new object();
    var weakRef = new WeakReference(unusedLocalVar);

    GC.Collect();  // <-- doesn't have to be an explicit call; just assume that
                   //     garbage collection would occur at this point.

    Debug.Assert(weakRef.IsAlive);
}

The main change in this code example from the previous one is that the new'ed object is strongly referenced by a local variable (unusedLocalVar). However, this variable is never used again after the weak reference (weakRef) has been created.


Question: Is a conforming C# compiler allowed to optimize the first two lines of Case_2 into those of Case_1 if it sees that unusedLocalVar is only used in one place, namely as an argument to the WeakReference constructor? i.e. is there any possibility that the assertion in Case_2 could ever fail?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It doesn't matter what the C# compiler does - the JITter/GC are allowed to clean up local references once they're no longer alive in a method body. Look at the docs for GC.KeepAlive

Also, this powerpoint presentation, especially from slide 30 onwards, helps to explain what the JIT/GC can get up to.

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4  
Also note that, in debug builds, the variable is explicitly kept alive to the end of the scope for the debugger to view -- it's only in release builds you'll see this behaviour. –  Andy Mortimer Apr 30 '10 at 7:14
    
@Andy - interesting point. Not that it matters, but I'm guessing this behaviour is governed by the JITter? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 30 '10 at 7:20
3  
And for completeness, that is why setting unusedLocalVar=null at the end of the method is usually a de-optimization. –  Henk Holterman Apr 30 '10 at 7:23
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: Thanks for the GC.KeepAlive cue, I think the MSDN documentation gives a 95% answer to my question. -- @Henk Holtermann: This seems less safe than GC.KeepAlive; couldn't a smart compiler recognise such a null assignment as superfluous and optimise it away, too? –  stakx Apr 30 '10 at 8:10
    
Yes, the JIT optimizer will remove the null assignments. The garbage collector gets cues for the lifespan of a local variable from the JIT compiler. GC.KeepAlive is a manual version of such a cue, it doesn't actually generate any code. –  Hans Passant Apr 30 '10 at 12:50
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While my question has been answered, I thought I'd post this relevant piece of information I just found on the MSDN blog article "WP7: When does GC Consider a Local Variable as Garbage" by abhinaba:

[T]he ECMA specification (ECMA 334 Section 10.9) […] states

“For instance, if a local variable that is in scope is the only existing reference to an object, but that local variable is never referred to in any possible continuation of execution from the current execution point in the procedure, an implementation might (but is not required to) treat the object as no longer in use.”

This says it all. The mentioned article also says that the .NET framework (at least in Release mode) will perform predictive analysis and free such objects, while the .NET Compact Framework won't (for performance reasons).

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Is a conforming C# compiler allowed to optimize the first two lines of Case_2 into those of Case_1 if it sees that unusedLocalVar is only used in one place, namely as an argument to the WeakReference constructor?

The two definitions are equivalent so transforming from one to the other is not an "optimization" because neither is more efficient.

i.e. is there any possibility that the assertion in Case_2 could ever fail?

Yes. A production compiler is not likely to retain a reference unnecessarily so it will be removed, the GC will not see it as a global root and will collect that object.

Note that garbage collectors do not see your program in terms of variables and scope. Those high-level concepts have long since been compiled away by the time your code gets to the garbage collector. The GC sees only registers, thread stacks and global variables.

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