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Im a complete novice to the "best practices" etc of writing in any code. I tend to just write it an if it works, why fix it.

Well, this way of working is landing me in some hot water. I am writing a simple windows service to server a single webpage. (This service will be incorperated in to another project which monitors the services and some folders on a group of servers.)

My problem is that whenever a request is recieved, the memory usage jumps up by a few K per request and keeps qoing up on every request.

Now ive found that by putting GC.Collect in the mix it stops at a certain number but im sure its not meant to be used this way. I was wondering if i am missing something or not doing something i should to free up memory.

Here is the code:

Public Class SimpleWebService : Inherits ServiceBase
    'Set the values for the different event log types.
    Public Const EVENT_ERROR As Integer = 1
    Public Const EVENT_WARNING As Integer = 2
    Public Const EVENT_INFORMATION As Integer = 4
    Public listenerThread As Thread
    Dim HTTPListner As HttpListener
    Dim blnKeepAlive As Boolean = True

    Shared Sub Main()
        Dim ServicesToRun As ServiceBase()
        ServicesToRun = New ServiceBase() {New SimpleWebService()}
        ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun)
    End Sub

    Protected Overrides Sub OnStart(ByVal args As String())
        If Not HttpListener.IsSupported Then
            CreateEventLogEntry("Windows XP SP2, Server 2003, or higher is required to " & "use the HttpListener class.")
            Me.Stop()
        End If
        Try
            listenerThread = New Thread(AddressOf ListenForConnections)
            listenerThread.Start()
        Catch ex As Exception
            CreateEventLogEntry(ex.Message)
        End Try
    End Sub

    Protected Overrides Sub OnStop()
        blnKeepAlive = False
    End Sub

    Private Sub CreateEventLogEntry(ByRef strEventContent As String)
        Dim sSource As String
        Dim sLog As String
        sSource = "Service1"
        sLog = "Application"
        If Not EventLog.SourceExists(sSource) Then
            EventLog.CreateEventSource(sSource, sLog)
        End If
        Dim ELog As New EventLog(sLog, ".", sSource)
        ELog.WriteEntry(strEventContent)
    End Sub

    Public Sub ListenForConnections()
        HTTPListner = New HttpListener
        HTTPListner.Prefixes.Add("http://*:1986/")
        HTTPListner.Start()
        Do While blnKeepAlive
            Dim ctx As HttpListenerContext = HTTPListner.GetContext()
            Dim HandlerThread As Thread = New Thread(AddressOf ProcessRequest)
            HandlerThread.Start(ctx)
            HandlerThread = Nothing
        Loop
        HTTPListner.Stop()
    End Sub

    Private Sub ProcessRequest(ByVal ctx As HttpListenerContext)
        Dim sb As StringBuilder = New StringBuilder
        sb.Append("<html><body><h1>Test My Service</h1>")
        sb.Append("</body></html>")
        Dim buffer() As Byte = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(sb.ToString)
        ctx.Response.ContentLength64 = buffer.Length
        ctx.Response.OutputStream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)
        ctx.Response.OutputStream.Close()
        ctx.Response.Close()
        sb = Nothing
        buffer = Nothing
        ctx = Nothing
        'This line seems to keep the mem leak down
        'System.GC.Collect()
    End Sub
End Class

Please feel free to critisise and tear the code apart but please BE KIND. I have admitted I dont tend to follow the best practice when it comes to coding.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are right, you should not be doing this. Remove the Collect() call and let it run for a week. Any decent .NET book will talk about how the garbage collector works and how it does not immediately release memory when you set an object to Nothing. It doesn't kick in until you've consumed somewhere between 2 and 8 megabytes. This is not a leak, merely effective use of a plentiful resource.

You use a new thread for each individual connection, that's pretty expensive and scales very poorly when you get a lot of connections. Consider using ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem instead. Threadpool threads are very cheap and their allocation and execution is well controlled by the threadpool manager.

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