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How can I loop through all subviews of a UIView, and their subviews and their subviews?

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1  
If you really do NEED to loop through then the accepted answer is correct, if just looking for a single view, then tag it and use viewWithTag instead - save yourself some pain! - developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/UIKit/Reference/… –  Norman H Apr 4 '13 at 10:30

13 Answers 13

up vote 80 down vote accepted

Use recursion:

// UIView+HierarchyLogging.h
@interface UIView (ViewHierarchyLogging)
- (void)logViewHierarchy;
@end

// UIView+HierarchyLogging.m
@implementation UIView (ViewHierarchyLogging)
- (void)logViewHierarchy
{
    NSLog(@"%@", self);
    for (UIView *subview in self.subviews)
    {
        [subview logViewHierarchy];
    }
}
@end

// In your implementation
[myView logViewHierarchy];
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2  
Is there a way to pass a function in the logViewHierarchy? That way it can suit your needs at different times. –  docchang Sep 7 '11 at 13:38
1  
@docchang: Obj-C blocks are a great fit for that use case. You pass a block to the method, execute the block and pass it down the hierarchy with each method call. –  Ole Begemann Sep 7 '11 at 14:04
    
Nice. I posted a snippet below that adds whitespace indentation to this technique. –  jaredsinclair Jul 14 '13 at 8:33

Well here is the Solution using Recursion , a wrapper(category/extension) for UIView class.

// UIView+viewRecursion.h
@interface UIView (viewRecursion)
- (NSMutableArray*) allSubViews;
@end

// UIView+viewRecursion.m
@implementation UIView (viewRecursion)
- (NSMutableArray*)allSubViews
{
   NSMutableArray *arr=[[[NSMutableArray alloc] init] autorelease];
   [arr addObject:self];
   for (UIView *subview in self.subviews)
   {
     [arr addObjectsFromArray:(NSArray*)[subview allSubViews]];
   }
   return arr;
}
@end

Usage : Now you should be looping through all the Sub Views and do manipulate them.

//disable all text fields
for(UIView *v in [self.view allSubViews])
{
     if([v isKindOfClass:[UITextField class]])
     {
         ((UITextField*)v).enabled=NO;
     }
}
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2  
Note there are memory leak in allSubViews function: you must either create array as [[[NSMutableArray alloc] init] autorelease] or as [NSMutableArray array] (which is the same). –  ivanzoid Jun 9 '11 at 11:24
    
By "a wrapper for UIView" you actually mean "a category for UIView". –  Dimitris Jun 11 '12 at 10:42
    
Yes Dimitris, i meant category. –  RamaKrishna Chunduri Jun 28 '12 at 10:06
    
@ivanzoid : yup! thats a leak.Thanks for the note, i fixed it now... –  RamaKrishna Chunduri Feb 20 at 4:59

Just found an interesting way to do this through the debugger:

http://idevrecipes.com/2011/02/10/exploring-iphone-view-hierarchies/

references this Apple Technote:

http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#technotes/tn2010/tn2239.html#SECUIKIT

Just make sure your debugger is paused (either set a break point of pause it manually) and you can ask for the recursiveDescription.

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I tag everything when it's created. Then it's easy to find any subview.

view = [aView viewWithTag:tag];
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This is exactly what I was looking for! Awesome! Gems like this are pretty nice to find. –  Norman H Apr 4 '13 at 10:31

With the help of Ole Begemann. I added a few lines to incorporate the block concept into it.

UIView+HierarchyLogging.h

typedef void (^ViewActionBlock_t)(UIView *);
@interface UIView (UIView_HierarchyLogging)
- (void)logViewHierarchy: (ViewActionBlock_t)viewAction;
@end

UIView+HierarchyLogging.m

@implementation UIView (UIView_HierarchyLogging)
- (void)logViewHierarchy: (ViewActionBlock_t)viewAction {
    //view action block - freedom to the caller
    viewAction(self);

    for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {
        [subview logViewHierarchy:viewAction];
    }
}
@end

Using the HierarchyLogging category in your ViewController. You are now have freedom to what you need to do.

void (^ViewActionBlock)(UIView *) = ^(UIView *view) {
    if ([view isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]) {
        NSLog(@"%@", view);
    }
};
[self.view logViewHierarchy: ViewActionBlock];
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Looks like I made a very similar solution as the one you proposed here. I went ahead and posted it on github in case others might find it useful. Here's my answer w/ the link :) stackoverflow.com/a/10440510/553394 –  Eric Goldberg May 3 '12 at 23:17
    
How could I add a way to halt the recursion from within the block? Say I'm using this to locate a specific view, once I've found it I'd like to stop there and not continue searching the rest of the view hierarchy. –  micpringle Mar 17 at 17:33

Here is a recursive code:-

 for (UIView *subViews in yourView.subviews) {
    [self removSubviews:subViews];

}   

-(void)removSubviews:(UIView *)subView
{
if (subView.subviews.count>0) {
    for (UIView *subViews in subView.subviews) {

        [self removSubviews:subViews];
    }
}
else
{
     NSLog(@"%i",subView.subviews.count);
    [subView removeFromSuperview];
}
}
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By the way, I made an open source project to help with this sort of task. It's really easy, and uses Objective-C 2.0 blocks to execute code on all views in a hierarchy.

https://github.com/egold/UIViewRecursion

Example:

-(void)makeAllSubviewsGreen
{
    [self.view runBlockOnAllSubviews:^(UIView *view) {

        view.backgroundColor = [UIColor greenColor];
    }];
}
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The code posted in this answer traverses all windows and all views and all of their subviews. It was used to dump a printout of the view hierarchy to NSLog but you can use it as a basis for any traversal of the view hierarchy. It uses a recursive C function to traverse the view tree.

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Need not create any new function. Just do it when debugging with Xcode.

Set a breakpoint in a view controller, and make the app pause at this breakpoint.

Right click the empty area and press "Add Expression..." in Xcode's Watch window.

Input this line:

(NSString*)[self->_view recursiveDescription]

If the value is too long, right click it and choose "Print Description of ...". You will see all subviews of self.view in the console window. Change self->_view to something else if you don't want to see subviews of self.view.

Done! No gdb!

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Here is a variation on Ole Begemann's answer above, which adds indentation to illustrate the hierarchy:

// UIView+HierarchyLogging.h
@interface UIView (ViewHierarchyLogging)
- (void)logViewHierarchy:(NSString *)whiteSpaces;
@end

// UIView+HierarchyLogging.m
@implementation UIView (ViewHierarchyLogging)
- (void)logViewHierarchy:(NSString *)whiteSpaces {
    if (whiteSpaces == nil) {
        whiteSpaces = [NSString string];
    }
    NSLog(@"%@%@", whiteSpaces, self);

    NSString *adjustedWhiteSpaces = [whiteSpaces stringByAppendingFormat:@"    "];

    for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {
        [subview logViewHierarchy:adjustedWhiteSpaces];
    }
}
@end
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I wrote a category some time back to debug some views.

IIRC, the posted code is the one that worked. If not, it will point you in the right direction. Use at own risk, etc.

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This displays the hierarchy level as well

@implementation UIView (ViewHierarchyLogging)
- (void)logViewHierarchy:(int)level
{
    NSLog(@"%d - %@", level, self);
    for (UIView *subview in self.subviews)
    {
        [subview logViewHierarchy:(level+1)];
    }
}
@end
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Wish I'd found this page first, but if (for some reason) you want to do this non-recursively, not in a Category, and with more lines of code

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