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I get a NullPointerException calling a Superclass Method in Subclass Inner Class Constructor... What's the Deal?


In my application's main class (subclass of Application), I have a public inner class that simply contains 3 public string objects. In the parent class I declare an object of that inner class.

public class MainApplication extends Application {
    public class Data {
        public String x;
        public String y;
        public String z;
    }

    private Data data;

    MainApplication() {
        data = new Data()

        data.x = SuperClassMethod();
    }
}

After I instantiate the object in the constructor, I get a runtime error when I try to assign a value in the inner class with a superclass method.

Any idea what's up here?? Can you not call superclass methods in the subclass constructor?

** Edit ** Original question was about inner class member assignment in outer class constructor. Turned out the issue was with calling a superclass method in the class's constructor. It was giving me a null pointer exception. Thus, the question has changed.

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3  
What's the error? –  OscarRyz Apr 30 '10 at 19:37
    
My code is a rough psuedo-version of my actual code. Semicolon not an issue. I have no compile errors. When I run the application, I get an android dialog popping up saying "The application has stopped unexpectedly. Please try again." On further debugging, it turns out one of the assignments I'm making is using a method of the parent class and throwing a NullPointerException. Not sure why though when the superclass constructor is implicitly called FIRST in the subclass's constructor, right? –  stormin986 Apr 30 '10 at 20:58
    
This is weird, however, because earlier when I commented out the line using the superclass method, it still crashed. Now when I'm just assigning constant strings to the inner class members, it's fine. Odd... –  stormin986 Apr 30 '10 at 20:59
    
if the superclass constructor has a Npe, you have to fixed first. Let us see the stacktrace and we can know what is it all about. –  OscarRyz May 1 '10 at 13:50
    
Unfortunately (and fortunately) I'm well past this issue; I just loaded the data in a new method instead of the constructor. It's too much work to roll the code back to get the stack trace. However, what do you mean "you have to fixed first"? –  stormin986 May 1 '10 at 16:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try making your innerclass static:

public static class Data {

that way it isn't tied to the MainApplication instance.

update

From your comment it seems that you mean that the Application part of the object-under-construction is not initialised correctly when methods on it are called.

Calling methods of objects that are being constructed from their own constructor can result in unexpected behaviour as the objects are not initialised consistently until the constructor finishes. That said, it is possible that adding an explicit call to the super constructor fixes your dependency:

MainApplication() {
    super();

    data = new Data();
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-1 What's wrong with being tied to the MainApplication instance, since it is created in the MainApplication constructor, the instance does exists (unless Dalvik works differently which I don't think so ) –  OscarRyz Apr 30 '10 at 20:16
    
@Oscar, what is wrong is that while in the constructor MainApplication is not constructed fully which means that the implicit reference between the Data instance and its parent object still refers to an object that is possibly inconsistent. Kinda like when you call your own methods from your constructor. –  rsp May 1 '10 at 6:27
    
mmhh that's not how java works. Anyway, that isn't the problem here :) Peace –  OscarRyz May 1 '10 at 13:51
    
You say that's not how java works (and I would have thought the same) ... but I had issues calling a superclass method in the subclass constructor... I'll buy this until I get a better explanation. –  stormin986 May 8 '10 at 19:46

So I added a semicolon, an empty base class and a main.

class Application {
}

public class MainApplication extends Application {
    public class Data {
        public String x;
        public String y;
        public String z;
    }

    private Data data;

    MainApplication() {
        data = new Data();

        data.x = "String";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new MainApplication();
    }
}

Works for me! (Although I don't have an Android platform.)

(Was the semicolon a copy-and-paste error? Or was this not the original code?)

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+1 and the mind reading badge if this is the correct answer. Since stormin986 is not posting the actual error ( which in this case would be: "Good programmer expected" ) we can't know if this was the correct answer or not. –  OscarRyz Apr 30 '10 at 20:18
    
Those problems would rather have produced a compiletime error. –  BalusC May 1 '10 at 15:55

A non-static inner class such as Data class requires an instance of MainApplication to be valid. During the constructor MainApplication is not fully formed and so cannot be used. As rsp said, making Data static should get round this problem.

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The code as almost posted does work. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 30 '10 at 20:01
    
-1 Since he instantiating the inner class Data inside the constructor of the outer class, the instance already exists. This answer is misleading. –  OscarRyz Apr 30 '10 at 20:15
    
An instance is not considered complete until its constructor has completed. Even if it can be made to work, it's extremely bad practice to do what's being done here. –  DJClayworth May 3 '10 at 14:03

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