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If I have a date, how do I calculate the week number for that date within that year?

For example, in 2008, January 1st to January 6th are in week 1 and January 7th to the 13th are in week 2, so if my date was January 10th 2008, my week number would be 2.

An algorithm would be great to get me started and sample code would also help - I'm developing in C++ on Windows.

Related:

Getting week number off a date in MS SQL Server 2005?

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12 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Pseudocode:

int julian = getDayOfYear(myDate)  // Jan 1 = 1, Jan 2 = 2, etc...
int dow = getDayOfWeek(myDate)     // Sun = 0, Mon = 1, etc...
int dowJan1 = getDayOfWeek("1/1/" + thisYear)   // find out first of year's day
int badWeekNum = (julian / 7) + 1  // Get our week# (wrong)
int weekNum = ((julian + 6) / 7)   // probably better.  CHECK THIS LINE. (See comments.)
if (dow < dowJan1)                 // adjust for being after Saturday of week #1
    ++weekNum;
return (weekNum)

To clarify, this algorithm assumes you number your weeks like this:

S  M  T  W  R  F  S
            1  2  3    <-- week #1
4  5  6  7  8  9 10    <-- week #2
[etc.]

getDayOfWeek() and getDayOfYear() are standard date-object operations in most languages. If yours doesn't have them, you can count-forward from some known date (Jan 1, 1970 is a common one), after looking up to see what day of the week it was.

If you're going to implement your own date counting routines, remember that years that are divisible by 100 are NOT leap years, unless they are also divisible by 400. So 1900 was not a leap year, but 2000 was. If you're going to work far back in time, you have to mess with Gregorian vs Julian calendars, etc., see Wikipedia for loads of info on that.

This link talks about date/time functions in Windows/C++ in greater detail.

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This fits my simple needs perfectly, thanks –  Big GH Nov 10 '08 at 22:38
    
It is interesting that this algorithm, which does not do what the question asked for, meets your (presumably revised) needs. (No; I'm not claiming that my answer does what your question asked either.) –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 16 '08 at 5:38
    
I'd agree it doesn't do what I asked for, but I realised I'd not been asking for what I really wanted! My definition of week no. was one I thought was "standard", but as it wasn't I was happy to change my definition. I think your answer might be the more correct one, but this was the one I used. –  Big GH Nov 20 '08 at 16:29
1  
Unless I'm mistaken, this isn't correct. Just take Jan 7th from the example: juilan = 7, dow = 3, dowJan1 = 4, weekNum = (7/7)+1 = 2. Then dow is less than dowJan1 so weekNum+1 = 3. But clearly Jan 7 is week 2. –  NKijak Mar 5 '11 at 19:19
    
@NKijak -- good catch! Look like instead of ((julian / 7) + 1), I should use ((julian + 6) / 7) -- does that fix all the "off by one" stuff? Either way, I think debugging the fineries can be qed, the basic idea is there. (If someone wants to vet my fix, I'll edit the answer to contain the corrected code.) –  Olie Mar 16 '11 at 3:07
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Be aware that while your definition of nth week of the year is tenable, it is also not 'the' standard one.

ISO 8601 defines a standard for the representation of dates, times and time zones. It defines weeks that start on a Monday. It also says Week 1 of a year is the one which contains at least 4 days from the given year. Consequently, the 29th, 30th and 31st of December 20xx could be in week 1 of 20xy (where xy = xx + 1), and the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of January 20xy could all be in the last week of 20xx. Further, there can be a week 53.

[Added: note that the C standard and the `strftime() function provides for weeks that start on Sunday as well as weeks that start on Monday. It is not clear that the C standard provides for the year number of week 0 for Sunday-based weeks. See also the answer from Emerick Rogul.]

Then comes the interesting testing phase -- when do you get week 53? One answer is on Friday 1st January 2010, which is in 2009-W53 (as, indeed, is Sunday 3rd January 2010). Similarly, Saturday 1st January 2005 is in 2004-W53, but Sunday 1st January 2006 is in 2005-W52.

That is an extract from a comment in the following code, which is actually in Informix SPL (Stored Procedure Language), but is readable - though probably not writable - without much further explanation. The '||' operator is the SQL string concatenation operation, and Sunday is day 0, Monday is day 1, ... Saturday is day 6 of the week. There are extensive notes in the comments, including relevant text from the standard. One line comments start '--'; possibly multiline comments start with '{' and end at the next '}'.

-- @(#)$Id: iso8601_weekday.spl,v 1.1 2001/04/03 19:34:43 jleffler Exp $
--
-- Calculate ISO 8601 Week Number for given date
-- Defines procedure: iso8601_weekday().
-- Uses procedure: iso8601_weeknum().

{
According to a summary of the ISO 8601:1988 standard "Data Elements and
Interchange Formats -- Information Interchange -- Representation of
dates and times":

    The week notation can also be extended by a number indicating the
    day of the week.  For example the day 1996-12-31 which is the
    Tuesday (day 2) of the first week of 1997 can also be written as

        1997-W01-2 or 1997W012

    for applications like industrial planning where many things like
    shift rotations are organized per week and knowing the week number
    and the day of the week is more handy than knowing the day of the
    month.

This procedure uses iso8601_weeknum() to format the YYYY-Www part of the
date, and appends '-d' to the result, allowing for Informix's coding of
Sunday as day 0 rather than day 7 as required by ISO 8601.
}

CREATE PROCEDURE iso8601_weekday(dateval DATE DEFAULT TODAY) RETURNING CHAR(10);
    DEFINE rv CHAR(10);
    DEFINE dw CHAR(4);
    LET dw = WEEKDAY(dateval);
    IF dw = 0 THEN
            LET dw = 7;
    END IF;
    RETURN iso8601_weeknum(dateval) || '-' || dw;
END PROCEDURE;
-- @(#)$Id: iso8601_weeknum.spl,v 1.1 2001/02/27 20:36:25 jleffler Exp $
--
-- Calculate ISO 8601 Week Number for given date
-- Defines procedures: day_one_week_one() and iso8601_weeknum().

{
According to a summary of the ISO 8601:1988 standard "Data Elements and
Interchange Formats -- Information Interchange -- Representation of
dates and times":

    In commercial and industrial applications (delivery times,
    production plans, etc.), especially in Europe, it is often required
    to refer to a week of a year.  Week 01 of a year is per definition
    the first week which has the Thursday in this year, which is
    equivalent to the week which contains the fourth day of January.  In
    other words, the first week of a new year is the week which has the
    majority of its days in the new year.  Week 01 might also contain
    days from the previous year and the week before week 01 of a year is
    the last week (52 or 53) of the previous year even if it contains
    days from the new year.  A week starts with Monday (day 1) and ends
    with Sunday (day 7).  For example, the first week of the year 1997
    lasts from 1996-12-30 to 1997-01-05 and can be written in standard
    notation as

        1997-W01 or 1997W01

    The week notation can also be extended by a number indicating the
    day of the week.  For example the day 1996-12-31 which is the
    Tuesday (day 2) of the first week of 1997 can also be written as

        1997-W01-2 or 1997W012

    for applications like industrial planning where many things like
    shift rotations are organized per week and knowing the week number
    and the day of the week is more handy than knowing the day of the
    month.

Referring to the standard itself, section 3.17 defines a calendar week:

    week, calendar: A seven day period within a calendar year, starting
    on a Monday and identified by its ordinal number within the year;
    the first calendar week of the year is the one that includes the
    first Thursday of that year.  In the Gregorian calendar, this is
    equivalent to the week which includes 4 January.

Section 5.2.3 "Date identified by Calendar week and day numbers" states:

    Calendar week is represented by two numeric digits.  The first
    calendar week of a year shall be identified as 01 [...]

    Day of the week is represented by one decimal digit.  Monday
    shall be identified as day 1 of any calendar week [...]

Section 5.2.3.1 "Complete representation" states:

    When the application clearly identifies the need for a complete
    representation of a date identified by calendar week and day
    numbers, it shall be one of the alphanumeric representations as
    follows, where CCYY represents a calendar year, W is the week
    designator, ww represents the ordinal number of a calendar week
    within the year, and D represents the ordinal number within the
    calendar week.

    Basic format: CCYYWwwD
        Example: 1985W155
    Extended format: CCYY-Www-D
        Example: 1985-W15-5

Both the summary and the formal definition are intuitively clear, but it
is not obvious how to translate it into an algorithm.  However, we can
deal with the problem by exhaustively enumerating the seven options for
the day of the week on which 1st January falls (with actual year values
for concreteness):

    1st January 2001 is Monday    => Week 1 starts on 2001-01-01
    1st January 2002 is Tuesday   => Week 1 starts on 2001-12-31
    1st January 2003 is Wednesday => Week 1 starts on 2002-12-30
    1st January 2004 is Thursday  => Week 1 starts on 2003-12-29
    1st January 2010 is Friday    => Week 1 starts on 2010-01-04
    1st January 2005 is Saturday  => Week 1 starts on 2005-01-03
    1st January 2006 is Sunday    => Week 1 starts on 2006-01-02

(Cross-check: 1st January 1997 was a Wednesday; the summary notes state
that week 1 of 1997 started on 1996-12-30, which is consistent with the
table derived for dates in the first decade of the third millennium
above).

When working with the Informix DATE types, bear in mind that Informix
uses WEEKDAY values 0 = Sunday, 1 = Monday, 6 = Saturday.  When the
weekday of the first of January has the value in the LH column, you need
to add the value in the RH column to the 1st of January to obtain the
date of the first day of the first week of the year.

    Weekday         Offset to
    1st January     1st day of week 1

    0               +1
    1                0
    2               -1
    3               -2
    4               -3
    5               +3
    6               +2

This can be written as MOD(11-w,7)-3 where w is the (Informix encoding
of the) weekday of 1st January and the value 11 is used to ensure that
no negative values are presented to the MOD operator.  Hence, the
expression for the date corresponding to the 1st day (Monday) of the 1st
week of a given year, yyyy, is:

    d1w1 = MDY(1, 1, yyyy) + MOD(11 - WEEKDAY(MDY(1,1,yyyy)), 7) - 3

This expression is encapsulated in stored procedure day_one_week_one:
}

CREATE PROCEDURE day_one_week_one(yyyy INTEGER) RETURNING DATE;
    DEFINE jan1 DATE;
    LET jan1 = MDY(1, 1, yyyy);
    RETURN jan1 + MOD(11 - WEEKDAY(jan1), 7) - 3;
END PROCEDURE;

{
Given this date d1w1, we can calculate the week number of any other date
in the same year as:

    TRUNC((dateval - d1w1) / 7) + 1

The residual issues are ensuring that the wraparounds are correct.  If
the given date is earlier than the start of the first week of the year
that contains it, then the date belongs to the last week of the previous
year.  If the given date is on or after the start of the first week of
the next year, then the date belongs to the first week of the next year.

Given these observations, we can write iso8601_weeknum as shown below.
(Beware: iso8601_week_number() is too long for servers with the
18-character limit; so is day_one_of_week_one()).

Then comes the interesting testing phase -- when do you get week 53?
One answer is on Friday 1st January 2010, which is in 2009-W53 (as,
indeed, is Sunday 3rd January 2010).  Similarly, Saturday 1st January
2005 is in 2004-W53, but Sunday 1st January 2006 is in 2005-W52.
}

CREATE PROCEDURE iso8601_weeknum(dateval DATE DEFAULT TODAY) RETURNING CHAR(8);
    DEFINE rv CHAR(8);
    DEFINE yyyy CHAR(4);
    DEFINE ww CHAR(2);
    DEFINE d1w1 DATE;
    DEFINE tv DATE;
    DEFINE wn INTEGER;
    DEFINE yn INTEGER;
    -- Calculate year and week number.
    LET yn = YEAR(dateval);
    LET d1w1 = day_one_week_one(yn);
    IF dateval < d1w1 THEN
        -- Date is in early January and is in last week of prior year
        LET yn = yn - 1;
        LET d1w1 = day_one_week_one(yn);
    ELSE
        LET tv = day_one_week_one(yn + 1);
        IF dateval >= tv THEN
            -- Date is in late December and is in the first week of next year
            LET yn = yn + 1;
            LET d1w1 = tv;
        END IF;
    END IF;
    LET wn = TRUNC((dateval - d1w1) / 7) + 1;
    -- Calculation complete: yn is year number and wn is week number.
    -- Format result.
    LET yyyy = yn;
    IF wn < 10 THEN
        LET ww = '0' || wn;
    ELSE
        LET ww = wn;
    END IF
    LET rv = yyyy || '-W' || ww;
    RETURN rv;
END PROCEDURE;

For completeness, the inverse function is also easy to write with the day_one_week_one() function above:

-- @(#)$Id: ywd_date.spl,v 1.1 2012/12/29 05:13:27 jleffler Exp $
-- @(#)Create ywd_date() and ywdstr_date() stored procedures

-- Convert a date in format year, week, day (ISO 8601) to DATE.
-- Two variants:
-- ywd_date(yyyy SMALLINT, ww SMALLINT, dd SMALLINT) RETURNING DATE;
-- ywdstr_date(ywd CHAR(10)) RETURNING DATE;

-- NB: If week 53 is supplied, there is no check that the year had week
--     53 (GIGO).
-- NB: If year yyyy is a leap year and yyyy-01-01 falls on Wed (3) or
--     Thu (4), there are 53 weeks in the year.
-- NB: If year yyyy is not a leap year and yyyy-01-01 falls on Thu (4),
--     there are 53 weeks in the year.

CREATE PROCEDURE ywd_date(yyyy SMALLINT, ww SMALLINT, dd SMALLINT) RETURNING DATE AS date;
    DEFINE d DATE;
    -- Check ranges
    IF yyyy < 1 OR yyyy > 9999 OR ww < 1 OR ww > 53 OR dd < 1 OR dd > 7 THEN
        RETURN NULL;
    END IF;
    LET d = day_one_week_one(yyyy);
    LET d = d + (ww - 1) * 7 + (dd - 1);
    RETURN d;
END PROCEDURE;

-- Input: 2012-W52-5
CREATE PROCEDURE ywdstr_date(ywd CHAR(10)) RETURNING DATE AS date;
    DEFINE yyyy SMALLINT;
    DEFINE ww   SMALLINT;
    DEFINE dd   SMALLINT;
    LET yyyy = SUBSTR(ywd,  1, 4);
    LET ww   = SUBSTR(ywd,  7, 2);
    LET dd   = SUBSTR(ywd, 10, 1);
    RETURN ywd_date(yyyy, ww, dd);
END PROCEDURE;

CREATE TEMP TABLE test_dates(d DATE);
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2011-12-28');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2011-12-29');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2011-12-30');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2011-12-31');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2012-01-01');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2012-01-02');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2012-01-03');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2012-01-04');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2012-01-05');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2012-01-06');
INSERT INTO test_dates VALUES('2012-01-07');

SELECT d, iso8601_weeknum(d), iso8601_weekday(d), ywdstr_date(iso8601_weekday(d))
  FROM test_dates
 ORDER BY d;

As noted in the comments, the code will accept a week 53 date even if the year should only accept 52 weeks.

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Oh, and the current version of the standard is ISO/IEC 8601:2004. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 8 '08 at 18:33
    
Thanks for the very detailed explanation, I hadn't realised the different implications and ways of calculating a week number! –  Big GH Nov 10 '08 at 22:37
    
Yowza! I wonder how many people know about the 4-day thing... Thanks! –  Olie Nov 11 '08 at 2:37
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I strongly recommend using the C Standard Library's time functions to calculate the week number. Specifically, the strftime function has specifiers to print the week number (among many other values) given a date in broken-down (struct tm) format. Here's a small sample program that illustrates this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>

int
main(void)
{
  struct tm tm;
  char timebuf[64];

  // Zero out struct tm
  memset(&tm, 0, sizeof(struct tm));

  // November 4, 2008 11:00 pm
  tm.tm_sec = 0;
  tm.tm_min = 0;
  tm.tm_hour = 23;
  tm.tm_mday = 4;
  tm.tm_mon = 10;
  tm.tm_year = 108;

  // Call mktime to recompute tm.tm_wday and tm.tm_yday
  mktime(&tm);

  if (strftime(timebuf, sizeof(timebuf), "%W", &tm) != 0) {
    printf("Week number is: %s\n", timebuf);
  }

  return 0;
}

The output from this program (compiled with GCC on Linux and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 SP1 on Windows) is:

Week number is: 44

You can learn more about strftime here.

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Note also %U, %G, %u, %V, etc. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 16 '08 at 5:48
    
ISO C 90 doesn't support %U, %G, %u, %V and visual studio 2005 (and 2008 I believe) follow C 90 in this regard so on windows these are not available. They are documented at opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/strftime.html –  danio Feb 19 '09 at 10:29
1  
Looking at the source for strftime, this is the calculation that is used: (t->tm_yday + 7 - (t->tm_wday ? (t->tm_wday - 1) : 6)) / 7 . Using this calculation directly avoids having to convert to/from a string. –  Kekoa Apr 30 '13 at 20:57
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struct tm is used to represent "broken down time" and has at least the following fields:

int    tm_sec   Seconds [0,60]. 
int    tm_min   Minutes [0,59]. 
int    tm_hour  Hour [0,23]. 
int    tm_mday  Day of month [1,31]. 
int    tm_mon   Month of year [0,11]. 
int    tm_year  Years since 1900. 
int    tm_wday  Day of week [0,6] (Sunday =0). 
int    tm_yday  Day of year [0,365]. 
int    tm_isdst Daylight Savings flag. 

You can create a struct tm from a time_t with the localtime() function.

You can create a time_t from a struct tm with the mktime() function.

The best part about struct tm is that you can do things like add 24 to the month of year member and when you call mktime() you'll get a time_t thats 2 years in the future (this works with any of its members, so you can, for example, increment the hour by 1000 and then get a time_t 41 days in the future)...

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But struct tm doesn't have week of year so this is of limited use for this case. –  danio Feb 18 '09 at 16:46
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To convert in both directions, see here: Wikipedia article on ISO week dates

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Sorry, i'm new here and cant comment on the answer itself but the pseudo code from the answer with the checkmark isnt compeltey correct.

Pseudocode:

int julian = getDayOfYear(myDate)  // Jan 1 = 1, Jan 2 = 2, etc...
int dow = getDayOfWeek(myDate)     // Sun = 0, Mon = 1, etc...
int dowJan1 = getDayOfWeek("1/1/" + thisYear)   // find out first of year's day
int weekNum = (julian / 7) + 1     // Get our week#
if (dow < dowJan1)                 // adjust for being after Saturday of week #1
    ++weekNum;
return (weekNum)

you should not look for the "first of year's day", but for the last day of last year.

getDayOfWeek("12/31/" + thisYear-1)

would be correct instead of

getDayOfWeek("1/1/" + thisYear)

If you don't do this, the last weekday of last year (like Monday) would always be one week ahead.

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please check your formatting of the pseudo code. –  Gregor Jun 19 '09 at 9:55
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Use gmtime or localtime to calculate days since Sunday (that is, day of the week) and days since January 1 (note that Jan 1 is "0" in the latter).

The arbitrary bit is deciding what day of the year Week 1 starts on: usually it only depends what day of the week Jan 1 was, which of course you can calculate from the two pieces of information from gmtime. Then use a table lookup for the 7 possibilities, it's probably easier than coding the rules.

For example, I think Outlook uses the standard that Week 1 is the first week containing a Thursday. So if Jan 1 is a Sunday, then the first day of Week 1 is Jan 1, or day 0. The remaining possibilities are Monday, -1; Tuesday, -2; Wednesday, -3; Thursday, -4; Friday, 2; Saturday, 1.

Note the negative numbers: "Sunday of week 1" doesn't actually exist in 4 out of 7 cases, but if we pretend it was a day back in the previous year, we'll get the right answer out.

Once you have that, the number of days between it and your date tells you the week number: divide by 7 and add 1.

That said, I imagine there's a Windows API somewhere that will give you the same week number that Outlook uses. I just don't know what it is, and of course if your Week 1 rules are different from Outlook's then it's probably not much use.

Untested code:

int firstdays[7] = { 0, -1, -2, -3, -4, 2, 1 }; // or some other Week 1 rule
struct tm breakdown;
time_t target = time_you_care_about();
_gmtime_s(&breakdown,&target);
int dayofweek = breakdown.tm_wday;
int dayofyear = breakdown.tm_yday;

int jan1wday = (dayofweek - dayofyear) % 7;
if (jan1wday < 0) jan1wday += 7;

int week1first = firstdays[jan1wday];
if (dayofyear < week1first) return 0;
return ((dayofyear - week1first)/7) + 1;

Something like that, anyway.

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Boost provides gregorian::date::week_number() see http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_38_0/doc/html/boost/gregorian/date.html and http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_38_0/boost/date_time/gregorian/greg_date.hpp.

However I cannot see a way to get the year number which matches the week number (which may be different to the calendar year for that date).

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My definition which is non-ISO 8601 (good enough for my purposes and fast):

// week number of the year
// (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number [00,53].
// All days in a new year preceding the first Monday are considered to be in week 0.
int GetWeek(const struct tm& ts)
{
    return (ts.tm_yday + 7 - (ts.tm_wday ? (ts.tm_wday - 1) : 6)) / 7;
}
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My assumption was that the first week on the year may contain up to 7 day as illustrated in Olie's answer. The code does not handle the cultures where the week starts on another day than Sunday and that is a large part of the world.

tm t = ... //the date on which to find week of year

int wy = -1;

struct tm t1;
t1.tm_year = t.tm_year;
t1.tm_mday = t1.tm_mon = 1; //set to 1st of January
time_t tt = mktime(&t1); //compute tm

//remove days for 1st week
int yd = t.tm_yday - (7 - t1.tm_wday);
if(yd <= 0 ) //first week is now negative
  wy = 0;
else
  wy = (int)std::ceil( (double) ( yd/7) ); //second week will be 1 
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public int GetWeekOfYear(DateTime todayDate)
{
    int days = todayDate.DayOfYear;
    float result = days / 7;
    result=result+1;
    Response.Write(result.ToString());
    return Convert.ToInt32(result);
}

Just pass the current date as the parameter to this function. Then you will get the current week number. Hope it solves ur problem. Any suggestions are greatly welcome.

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Google came up with this: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/datetime/week.aspx

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