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I need to access this from my setInterval handler

prefs: null,
startup : function()
    {
        // init prefs
        ...
        this.retrieve_rate();
        this.intervalID = setInterval(this.retrieve_rate, this.INTERVAL);
    },

retrieve_rate : function()
    {
        var ajax = null;
        ajax = new XMLHttpRequest();
        ajax.open('GET', 'http://xyz.com', true);
        ajax.onload = function()
        {
            // access prefs here
        }
    }

How can I access this.prefs in ajax.onload ?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 47 down vote accepted

The setInterval line should look like this:-

 this.intervalID = setInterval(
     (function(self) {         //Self-executing func which takes 'this' as self
         return function() {   //Return a function in the context of 'self'
             self.retrieve_rate(); //Thing you wanted to run as non-window 'this'
         }
     })(this),
     this.INTERVAL     //normal interval, 'this' scope not impacted here.
 ); 

Edit: The same principle applies to the " onload ". In this case its common for the "outer" code to do little, it just sets up the request an then sends it. In this case the extra overhead an additinal function as in the above code is unnecessary. Your retrieve_rate should look more like this:-

retrieve_rate : function()
{
    var self = this;
    var ajax = new XMLHttpRequest();
    ajax.open('GET', 'http://xyz.com', true);
    ajax.onreadystatechanged= function()
    {
        if (ajax.readyState == 4 && ajax.status == 200)
        {
            // prefs available as self.prefs
        }
    }
    ajax.send(null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was going to do this initially, but then I remembered this pattern is really most useful for loops. –  Matthew Flaschen May 1 '10 at 8:26
    
@Matthew Flaschen: It just as useful for this scenario as it is for loops. –  Andy E May 1 '10 at 9:51
    
@Anthony: so the trick with self is the only option here? can you confirm that the solution by Matthew will not work? –  Pablo May 1 '10 at 13:03
    
@Michael: First of all its not a "trick" its just how things work in Javascript. Matthew's answer as it currently stands at time of writing this comment doesn't work. There was an earlier version of it that might have worked but it involved passing this as a parameter which was unnecessary and awkard (any caller of retrieve_rate would have know this unnecessary special requirement). –  AnthonyWJones May 1 '10 at 19:26
    
passing this as an argument to the (function(self){...})(this) in setInterval didn't work for me because the function is executed immediately instead of being delayed. @Joel Fillmore's solution works for me –  sketchfemme Jan 21 '13 at 18:59

The default behavior of setInterval is to bind to the global context. You can call a member function by saving a copy of the current context. Inside retrieve_rate the this variable will be correctly bound to the original context. Here is what your code would look like:

var self = this;
this.intervalID = setInterval(
    function() { self.retrieve_rate(); },
    this.INTERVAL);

Bonus tip: For a plain function reference (as opposed to an object reference which has a member function) you can change the context by using JavaScript's call or apply methods.

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1  
This worked for me, the call to 'call' doesn't seem to be needed though. The context of retrieve_rate should be set to self by default, because it is called as a member function. –  Dreendle Feb 7 '12 at 12:47
    
@Dreendle - you are right, I remembered solving this for a callback function reference where it was needed. I've fixed the answer, thanks! –  Joel Fillmore Feb 8 '12 at 16:43
this.intervalID = setInterval(this.retrieve_rate.bind(this), this.INTERVAL);
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1  
This is the right solution. The accepted solution seems to require unnecessarily more code. –  Nick Karnik May 22 at 23:37
    
But this method has a drawback. Most likely, it will not work with older versions of IE –  Nechehin Jun 11 at 12:25

That's not a beauty solution but it's in common usage:

var self = this;
var ajax = null;
//...
ajax.onload = function() {
    self.prefs....;
}
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2  
The problem is how setInterval calls the retrieve_rate function, the this value inside the method refers to the global object... –  CMS May 1 '10 at 8:15
prefs: null,
startup : function()
    {
        // init prefs
        ...
        this.retrieve_rate();
        var context = this;
        this.intervalID = setInterval(function()
                                      {
                                          context.retrieve_rate();
                                      }, this.INTERVAL);
    },

retrieve_rate : function()
    {
        var ajax = null;
        ajax = new XMLHttpRequest();
        ajax.open('GET', 'http://xyz.com', true);
        var context = this;
        ajax.onload = function()
        {
            // access prefs using context.
            // e.g. context.prefs
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
this inside the function passed to setInterval, will refer to the global object. Did you mean context.retrieve_rate instead of this.retrieve_rate ? –  CMS May 1 '10 at 8:11
    
Thanks for spotting that, CMS. –  Matthew Flaschen May 1 '10 at 8:13
    
This has evolved in the right direction, don't need the context being passed as parameter though. –  AnthonyWJones May 1 '10 at 8:16
    
@Matthew, Anthony So how do I access it from onload? Tried this.prefs, but didn't work... –  Pablo May 1 '10 at 8:19
    
You're welcome Matthew, by the way, you don't need to use call, context.retrieve_rate() is enough, since you have a base object (context.) –  CMS May 1 '10 at 8:19

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