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Ok, I'm looking for the fastest possible way to read all of the contents of a file via php with a filepath on the server, also these files can be huge. So it's very important that it does a READ ONLY to it as fast as possible.

Is reading it line by line faster than reading the entire contents? Though, I remember reading up on this some, that reading the entire contents can produce errors for huge files. Is this true?

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(reference) ibm.com/developerworks/library/os-php-readfiles –  Gordon May 1 '10 at 9:51
1  
This question is slightly old, but for future reference, I found this site some time ago. It benchmarked several PHP read methods and concluded readfile() and fpassthru are the fastest, as long as you need zero processing of that file (ie. there's no PHP scripts inside the file that need to be processed). –  jmbertucci Feb 14 '13 at 22:37
    
Here are several important PHP methods to get content, and test them with echo microtime before starting function, and after function do again echo microtime and see the results: stackoverflow.com/questions/2176180/… –  tazo todua Jan 16 at 7:16

9 Answers 9

up vote 22 down vote accepted

If you want to load the full-content of a file to a PHP variable, the easiest (and, probably fastest) way would be file_get_contents.

But, if you are working with big files, loading the whole file into memory might not be such a good idea : you'll probably end up with a memory_limit error, as PHP will not allow your script to use more than (usually) a couple mega-bytes of memory.


So, even if it's not the fastest solution, reading the file line by line (fopen+fgets+fclose), and working with those lines on the fly, without loading the whole file into memory, might be necessary...

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Would using SESSIONS for storing this information be a good idea, so we don't have to keep opening up the file, if it's already been opened once? –  SoLoGHoST May 1 '10 at 9:44
1  
First of all, sessions are (by default) stored into files ;;; then, you should not put big data into session (as it's serialized/unserialized for each request) ;;; and storing this to sessions would be duplicating the data : each user has a different session ;;; so, I would say that no, storing this to session is not a good idea. –  Pascal MARTIN May 1 '10 at 9:49
    
So, sorry, if I'm not understanding this, do you think it would be better than to store it as a serialized string into the database after reading the file(s) line by line and than just opening it by unserializing it? –  SoLoGHoST May 1 '10 at 10:18
    
As long as you'll try to load the whole file into memory (be it from the file, from a session, from a database), if the data is too long, it'll consume to much memory ;;; which is why the best solution, to not use too much memory, would be to read the file line by line, deal with each line directly when it's read, and not store the whole data into memory. –  Pascal MARTIN May 1 '10 at 10:36

file_get_contents() is the most optimized way to read files in PHP, however - since you're reading files in memory you're always limited to the amount of memory available.

You can issue a ini_set('memory_limit', -1) if you have the right permissions but you'll still be limited by the amount of memory available on your system, this is common to all programming languages.

The only solution is to read the file in chunks, for that you can use file_get_contents() with the fourth and fifth arguments ($offset and $maxlen - specified in bytes):

string file_get_contents(string $filename[, bool $use_include_path = false[, resource $context[, int $offset = -1[, int $maxlen = -1]]]])

Here is an example where I use this technique to serve large download files:

public function Download($path, $speed = null)
{
    if (is_file($path) === true)
    {
        set_time_limit(0);

        while (ob_get_level() > 0)
        {
            ob_end_clean();
        }

        $size = sprintf('%u', filesize($path));
        $speed = (is_int($speed) === true) ? $size : intval($speed) * 1024;

        header('Expires: 0');
        header('Pragma: public');
        header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0');
        header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');
        header('Content-Length: ' . $size);
        header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="' . basename($path) . '"');
        header('Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary');

        for ($i = 0; $i <= $size; $i = $i + $speed)
        {
            ph()->HTTP->Flush(file_get_contents($path, false, null, $i, $speed));
            ph()->HTTP->Sleep(1);
        }

        exit();
    }

    return false;
}

Another option is the use the less optimized fopen(), feof(), fgets() and fclose() functions, specially if you care about getting whole lines at once, here is another example I provided in another StackOverflow question for importing large SQL queries into the database:

function SplitSQL($file, $delimiter = ';')
{
    set_time_limit(0);

    if (is_file($file) === true)
    {
        $file = fopen($file, 'r');

        if (is_resource($file) === true)
        {
            $query = array();

            while (feof($file) === false)
            {
                $query[] = fgets($file);

                if (preg_match('~' . preg_quote($delimiter, '~') . '\s*$~iS', end($query)) === 1)
                {
                    $query = trim(implode('', $query));

                    if (mysql_query($query) === false)
                    {
                        echo '<h3>ERROR: ' . $query . '</h3>' . "\n";
                    }

                    else
                    {
                        echo '<h3>SUCCESS: ' . $query . '</h3>' . "\n";
                    }

                    while (ob_get_level() > 0)
                    {
                        ob_end_flush();
                    }

                    flush();
                }

                if (is_string($query) === true)
                {
                    $query = array();
                }
            }

            return fclose($file);
        }
    }

    return false;
}

Which technique you use will really depend on what you're trying to do (as you can see with the SQL import function and the download function), but you'll always have to read the data in chunks.

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You could use file_get_contents

Example:

$homepage = file_get_contents('http://www.example.com/');
echo $homepage;
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So this would work for any size file? No matter how big it is in filesize? –  SoLoGHoST May 1 '10 at 9:39
    
@SoLoGHoST: nope it has memory limits too. –  Sarfraz May 1 '10 at 9:41
    
Oh, ok, than this is not what I want than. Thanks anyways. –  SoLoGHoST May 1 '10 at 9:46
    
@SoLoGHoST: as an alternative, you could use the fgets function line by line. Also, the file_get_contents function works fine in most cases. –  Sarfraz May 1 '10 at 9:49
    
The code above will work only if directive allow_url_fopen is set to On or 1 in php.ini file. –  bodi0 Oct 27 at 11:49
$file_handle = fopen("myfile", "r");
while (!feof($file_handle)) {
   $line = fgets($file_handle);
   echo $line;
}
fclose($file_handle);
  1. Open the file. $file_handle stores a reference to the file itself.
  2. Check whether you are already at the end of the file.
  3. Keep reading the file until you are at the end, printing each line as you read it.
  4. Close the file.
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Use fpassthru or readfile. Both use constant memory with increasing file size.

http://raditha.com/wiki/Readfile_vs_include

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Reading the whole file in one go is faster.

But huge files may eat up all your memory and cause problems. Then your safest bet is to read line by line.

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If you're not worried about memory and file size,

$lines = file($path);

$lines is then the array of the file.

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which I believe is just a preg_split(/\r?\n?/, file_get_contents()) –  ppostma1 Apr 10 '12 at 19:30
foreach (new SplFileObject($filepath) as $lineNumber => $lineContent) {

    echo $lineNumber."==>".$lineContent;  
    //process your operations here
}
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You Could Try cURL (http://php.net/manual/en/book.curl.php).

Altho You Might Want To Check, It Has Its Limits As Well

$ch = curl_init();
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL, "http://example.com/");
curl_setopt ($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);
$data = curl_exec ($ch); // Whole Page As String
curl_close ($ch);
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