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Will this code:

inline int funcA(int a) __attribute__((always_inline))
{
    return a + 1;
}
inline int funcB(int b) __attribute__((always_inline))
{
    return funcA(b + 2);
}
int main()
{
    return funcB(3);
}

transformed to code like this?:

int main()
{
   return ((3) + 2) + 1;
}

GCC, ARM (iPhone)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Inlining function calls is not something the language requires compilers to do. It's a quality of implementation issue (QoI). But any of GCC, MSVC and clang will do it. Of course, you have to enable optimization.

For instance

# clang++ -cc1 -emit-llvm -O2 -o - main.cpp
define i32 @main() nounwind readnone {
entry:
  ret i32 6
}
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I like that it actually inlined then did another pass and evaluated the constant... well done clang. –  Grady Player Apr 16 '13 at 23:43

There are no guarantees when using inline. It serves merely as a hint to the compiler (which in many (not all) cases have more heuristics and better understanding of the impact of inlining than the programmer).

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Not necessarily. It depend's on the compiler and settings I guess. In fact in C++ for example it's not even guaranteed that this

inline int funcA(int a)
{
    return a + 1;
}
int main()
{
    return funcA(3);
}

will get transformed into this

int main()
{
    return 3 + 1;
}

inline is just the hint for the compiler. The compiler can ignore it.

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1  
But you can force the compiler (GCC) to do it: inline void foo (void) __attribute__((always_inline)); –  tur1ng May 1 '10 at 17:17

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