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We have a JavaScript function named "move" which does just "windows.location.href = any given anchor".
This function works on IE, Opera and Safari, but somehow is ignored in Firefox. Researching on Google doesn't produce a satisfactory answer why it doesn't work.
Does any JavaScript guru knows about this behavior, and what would be the best practice to jump to an anchor via JavaScript?

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I just tried setting "window.location.href" on w3school's test page and it worked. Are you sure nothing else could be causing the problem? w3schools.com/js/tryit.asp?filename=tryjs_location – Dan Herbert Nov 8 '08 at 19:59
    
Thanks for your post. Well, I tried to simplify the scenario. The whole picture is that we call the javascript from Response.Write, in an event coming from a DevExpress grid. That would be the whole context of the problem. Trying with only window.location didn't work. – julio.g Nov 8 '08 at 20:51
    
not sure if I get this "calling it from Response.Write" bit. If you are "echo"-ing it to the output, wrapped in a <script> tag, then it should work fine. is this what you are doing? – scunliffe Nov 8 '08 at 21:04
    
This is what I am doing: Response.Write("<script type='text/javaScript'> window.location.href = '#myAnchor'; </script>";); – julio.g Nov 8 '08 at 21:18
2  
ah, ok, thats the issue, you are trying to set a hash, not a url, thus all you are telling the browser to do is to scroll to a spot on the page either with the id="myAnchor", or <a name="myAnchor". If such a spot already exists in the DOM above where you are, it should scroll there, in the same pg. – scunliffe Nov 9 '08 at 0:33

16 Answers 16

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Have you tried just using

window.location = 'url';

In some browsers, window.location.href is a read-only property and is not the best way to set the location (even though technically it should allow you to). If you use the location property on its own, that should redirect for you in all browsers.

Mozilla's documentation has a pretty detailed explanation of how to use the window.location object.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.location

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4  
it is readonly in the sense that you can't change it, but setting a location.href is totally valid and works in all browsers (except in a cornercase scenario in IE6) – scunliffe Nov 8 '08 at 21:02
1  
Setting window.location instead of window.location.href causes problems in some other browsers. (I don't rememeber exactly which at the moment, though.) – Guffa Nov 19 '10 at 15:10
    
@Guffa If that's true, it's news to me. I don't know any browsers that have a problem setting the location object. I'd like to know what browsers can't, if you can find out... – Dan Herbert Nov 19 '10 at 18:11
    
@Craig As scunliffe pointed out, setting window.location.href will work, but not in IE6. Setting window.location works in all browsers that I've tested so far, however. – Dan Herbert May 24 '11 at 12:29
    
+1 for the updated post ;). My comment above is now irrelevant so I'll remove it. – Craig May 24 '11 at 12:37

If you are trying to call this javascript code after an event that is followed by a callback then you must add another line to your function:

function JSNavSomewhere()
{
    windows.location.href = myUrl;
    return false;
}

in your markup for the page, the control that calls this function on click must return this function's value

<asp:button ..... onlclick="return JSNavSomewhere();" />

The false return value will cancell the callback and the redirection will now work. Why this works in IE? Well I guess they were thinking differently on the issue when they prioritized the redirection over the callback.

Hope this helps!

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thanks! this issue was driving me nuts until I found this ! +1 to you for saving my hairline. – Scott Vercuski Jun 27 '11 at 11:16
1  
Thanks for this, saved me some time. IE6 always needs a special kick in the pants. – Yoshi Jul 21 '11 at 22:22
    
! +1 Thanks it solved my issue – SivaRajini Jan 17 '14 at 9:28

Maybe it's just a typo in your post and not in your code, but it's window and not window*s*

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One observation to ensure in such a scenario

Following will work in IE, but neither in Chrome nor in Firefox (the versions I tested)

 window.location.href("http://stackoverflow.com");

Following will work all the three

window.location.href = "http://stackoverflow.com";
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I am not sure to follow you.
I just tried: going with FF3 to Lua 5.1 Reference Manual (long and with lot of anchors).
Pasting javascript:window.location.href="#2.5"; alert(window.location.href); in the address bar, I went to the right anchor and it displayed the right URL. Works also with a full URL, of course.
Alternative code: javascript:(function () { window.location.href="#2.5"; })();

Perhaps you forgot the #. Common problem, also with image maps.

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Thanks for your post. I set the # char too. Can you try without the "alert" sentence? If I put an alert, somehow it works, if I remove it, it doesn't. – julio.g Nov 8 '08 at 20:17
1  
If you remove it in the bookmarklet, you have to replace it with void(0) or put the whole stuff in a function call: the bookmarklet must not have a final value. – PhiLho Nov 10 '08 at 9:11

window.location.href works fine in all versions of Firefox, as does document.location.href I think that there is something else in your code that is breaking things.

drop this in a blank page, if it works, it indicates there is something else wrong on your page.

<script>
  window.location.href = 'http://www.google.com/';
</script>
share|improve this answer

You've got to add return false; after the window.location.href as mentioned above.

function thisWorks()
{
    window.location.href = "http://www.google.com";
    return false;
}

function thisDoesNotWork()
{
    window.location.href = "http://www.google.com";
}
share|improve this answer

You could also use window.location.replace to jump to an anchor without register it in the browser history:

This article illustrates how to jump to an anchor and uses href as read-only property.

function navigateNext() 
{
    if (!window.location.hash) 
    {
        window.location.replace(window.location.href + unescape("#2"))
    } 
    else 
    {
        newItem = nextItem(window.location.hash)
        if (document.getElementById(newItem)) 
        {
            window.location.replace(stripHash(window.location) + "#" + newItem)
        } 
        else 
        {
            window.location.replace(stripHash(window.location) + "#1")
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why not just window.location.hash = "1"? All the replacing and stripping seems unnecessary. – Justin Johnson Jun 11 '10 at 17:15

Have you tried this?

Response.Write("<script type='text/javaScript'> window.location = '#myAnchor'; </script>";);
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I have the same problem and I guess this is related to a click event.

I have a function that moves the browser to a specific page. I attach that function to some click events: in a button and in a image. AlsoI execute the function when the user press escape (document onkeypress event).

The results are that in all cases the function is called and executed, but only when there is a click the browser goes to the address I want.

Update I got it working! with a

setTimeout( "location.replace('whatever.html');", 0 );

I don't know why the location.replace wasn't working when the event was a keypress, but with the settimeout it works :)

Update Returning false after the event when you press escape makes the redirection works. If you return true or nothing the browser will not follow

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please add full javascript script tag

<script type="text/javascript" language="javascript"></script>
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2  
There's really no need to use language="javascript" anymore.. – Amalgovinus Feb 25 '11 at 22:00
window.location.hash = "#gallery";
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For reference I had the same problem.

onclick = "javascript: window.location('example.html');" didn't work under FF (latest)

I just had to rewrite to onclick = "javascript: window.location = 'example.html';" to get it working

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I just overcome the same problem. and the problem is not in javascript, but the href attribute on the <a> element.

my js code

function sebelum_hapus()
{
var setuju = confirm ("Anda akan menghapus data...")
if (setuju)
window.location = "index.php";
}

my previous html was

<a href="" onClick="sebelum_hapus();">Klik here</a>

and I update it to

<a href="#" onClick="sebelum_hapus();">Klik here</a>

or remove the href attribute

hope this helps.

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sometime if you're using form to post data, this may happen. if you're using ajax, try to change 'form' to 'div'. this will prevent the default behavior of form and do your ajax code.

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Another option:

document.location.href ="..."
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