Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

C++0x thread library or Boost.thread define non-member variadic template function that lock all lock avoiding dead lock.

template <class L1, class L2, class... L3> void lock(L1&, L2&, L3&...);

While this function avoid help to deadlock, the standard do not includes the associated scoped lock to write exception safe code.

{
  std::lock(l1,l2);
  // do some thing
  // unlock li l2 exception safe
}

That means that we need to use other mechanism as try-catch block to make exception safe code or define our own scoped lock on multiple mutexes ourselves or even do that

{
  std::lock(l1,l2);
  std::unique_lock lk1(l1, std::adopted);
  std::unique_lock lk2(l2, std::adopted);
  // do some thing
  // unlock li l2 on destruction of lk1 lk2
}

Why the standard doesn't includes a scoped lock on multiple mutexes of the same type, as for example

{
  std::array_unique_lock<std::mutex> lk(l1,l2);
  // do some thing
  // unlock l1 l2 on destruction of lk
}

or tuples of mutexes

{
  std::tuple_unique_lock<std::mutex, std::recursive_mutex> lk(l1,l2);
  // do some thing
  // unlock l1 l2 on destruction of lk
}

Is there something wrong on the design?


Updated: description from the standard

template <class L1, class L2, class... L3> void lock(L1&, L2&, L3&...);

Requires: Each template parameter type shall meet the Mutex requirements, except that a call to try_- lock() may throw an exception. [ Note: The unique_lock class template meets these requirements when suitably instantiated. —end note ]

Effects: All arguments are locked via a sequence of calls to lock(), try_lock(), or unlock() on each argument. The sequence of calls shall not result in deadlock, but is otherwise unspecified. [ Note: A deadlock avoidance algorithm such as try-and-back-off must be used, but the specific algorithm is not specified to avoid over-constraining implementations. —end note ] If a call to lock() or try_lock() throws an exception, unlock() shall be called for any argument that had been locked by a call to lock() or try_lock().


I have accept the answer. I understand that the main reason is because there is no enough time to make the C++0x Thread library better. I hope that TR2 will include much more things.

share|improve this question
1  
Good question, i don't see why there isn't some scoped_multi_lock(T...). –  Georg Fritzsche May 1 '10 at 21:05
1  
Indeed, it seems to me the lock(...) functions are imbalanced. I would at least also expect equivalent unlock(...). It seems though that the best place to add such functionality would be to the lock_guard class. Wherein it could be constructed with multiple Lockables and unlock them upon destruction. As opposed to a bunch more template classes. –  GrafikRobot May 1 '10 at 22:05
    
@Grafik You are right. unlock should also be on the standard. The difference is that unlock(...) can not deadlock. –  Vicente Botet Escriba May 1 '10 at 22:38
    
@Grafik Respect to whether it is better to make the current lock_guard and unique_lock variadic templates or add new classes that are variadic, I think it is better to separate them as in most of the cases we needed to lock a mutex at a time. The variadic version will surely introduce more complication than solution for the the common case of one single mutex. –  Vicente Botet Escriba May 1 '10 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that by providing defer_lock_t (and adopt_lock_t) the expectation is that usage will be like your second example, or probably more like:

 std::unqiue_lock ul1(l1, std::deferred);
 std::unique_lock ul2(l2, std::deferred);
 std::lock(ul1, ul2);

This is exception safe and all that good stuff.

I certainly can't pretend to know the minds of the designers, but my guess is they are making an effort to provide a minimal set of portable, safe, primitives. A scoped multiple lock type is just so much icing, and it's icing that if in the standard needs to be specified and designed, or in boost.thread, icing that needs to be implemented (and of course ultimately the standard has to be concerned about implementation too, look what happened with export).

share|improve this answer
    
export is a completely different category and (would have) required major architectural changes in the compilers. Why do you think it needs so much icing? It should be just write-once in terms of the primitives already given. –  Georg Fritzsche May 1 '10 at 22:30
    
@Logan Sorry I make the error to use adopted instead of adopt_lock. –  Vicente Botet Escriba May 1 '10 at 22:47
    
@gf, that's sort of my point. It is write once in terms of the primitives already given, which is what makes it icing, which is why it doesn't need to be in the standard or a burden to the implementers. –  Logan Capaldo May 1 '10 at 22:51
    
@Logan I understand all your explanations, at least for std, less for Boost that is intended to propose new tools to experiment with. –  Vicente Botet Escriba May 1 '10 at 22:51
    
export, incidentally may be a bad example, but I just wanted to emphasize the idea that no matter how simple, easy or obvious it might be to implement something in principle, that doesn't make it free, the work still has to happen in practice. –  Logan Capaldo May 1 '10 at 22:54

Constructing one object that locks multiple locks does not avoid any deadlocks any more than locking them individually. You can't lock two locks simultaneously.. unless you use two threads, which kind of defeats the point. This holds true even if you put them in the same statement.

share|improve this answer
3  
Please see the standard. It uses an algorithm that uses try_lock and unlock that help to avoid deadlock,in cases two thread take both logs using the same function. –  Vicente Botet Escriba May 1 '10 at 21:51
    
How is that different to the OP just locking them both by himself? Could be that I misread the question, but I thought that he was suggesting that by having such a multiple lock structure, you would obviously instantly avoid deadlocks as opposed to locking them one after another. –  Puppy May 2 '10 at 12:26
    
No, it was about exception safety and RAII style multi-locks. Read the Boost.Thread documentation or the C++0x draft about lock(). –  Georg Fritzsche May 2 '10 at 16:52
    
please read the effect of lock(...) I had added on the question –  Vicente Botet Escriba May 4 '10 at 14:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.