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In C# I can perform a Console.Beep(). However, if you specify a duration of say 1000, or 1 second, it will not execute the next line of code until that second passes.

Is there any way possible to execute Console.Beep() in a non-blocking fashion so it will continue to beep and still continue executing the code below it while beeping?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can run it in a separate thread.

new Thread(() => Console.Beep()).Start();

I woke this morning to find flurry of comments on this answer. So I thought I would chime in with some other ideas.

The above can also be achieved running the thread on the Thread Pool, by using the following.

Action beep = Console.Beep;
beep.BeginInvoke((a) => { beep.EndInvoke(a); }, null);

The important thing in the above code is to call EndInvoke on your delegate if you use BeginInvoke otherwise you will experience memory leaks.

From MSDN:Important: Always call EndInvoke to complete your asynchronous call. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2e08f6yc(VS.80).aspx

Alternatively, you can use the dedicated Beep thread to have beeps run in the background when on demand without creating a new thread everytime or using the thread pool (see Simon Chadwick's comment). As a simple example, you could have the following. Notice that I pass 1 as the maxStackSize, this will ensure that the minimum (not 1, minimum) stack space is committed for this thread, see MSDN for more detail on this.

  class BackgroundBeep
  {
    static Thread _beepThread;
    static AutoResetEvent _signalBeep;

    static BackgroundBeep()
    {
      _signalBeep = new AutoResetEvent(false);
      _beepThread = new Thread(() =>
          {
            for (; ; )
            {
              _signalBeep.WaitOne();
              Console.Beep();
            }
          }, 1);
      _beepThread.IsBackground = true;
      _beepThread.Start();      
    }

    public static void Beep()
    {
      _signalBeep.Set();
    }
  }

With this, all you need to do to run a backround beep at anytime with out creating new threads is make the following call

BackgroundBeep.Beep();
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7  
Wow, 2MB+ of memory and some other system resources allocated for a beep! –  Pop Catalin May 1 '10 at 22:56
2  
@Pop Catalin: Do you have a link/reference for the memory overhead when starting a thread? –  0xA3 May 1 '10 at 23:08
5  
If the application needs this (and possibly other) non-blocking functions, then you could create a dedicated thread when the app starts, and have it wait on a semaphore. When the app needs a beep, all it has to do is raise the semaphore. This way a new thread is not created for each beep. In addition, this background thread could wait on a queue of "command" objects, so it could do many different operations. In this case the app would push a "Beep, 1000, 200" command onto the queue, and the background thread would pop this off the queue and perform the operation. –  Simon Chadwick May 2 '10 at 2:14
5  
@Eric, stack pages are committed by the CLR, not just reserved. Joe Duffy's post: bluebytesoftware.com/blog/2007/03/10/… –  Hans Passant May 2 '10 at 2:53
4  
Well I learned something new -- and astonishing -- today. I had no idea that we'd do this crazy thing of committing all that memory. Weird! –  Eric Lippert May 2 '10 at 16:16

You could use SoundPlayer.Play() and asynchronously annoy the user with something that sounds better than BEEP.

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+1 for annoying. –  Aaronaught May 1 '10 at 22:49

Here's a resource friendly way to play a beep asynchronously :

Action beep = Console.Beep;
beep.BeginInvoke(null, null); 
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With this method, is it still possible to specify the two int parameters of beep? So you can set duration/pitch? –  Siracuse May 1 '10 at 23:46
2  
Action beep = () => Console.Beep(freq, dur); beep.BeginInvoke(null, null); –  John Saunders May 2 '10 at 0:02

You can use the following code to run Console.Beep() in another thread:

System.Threading.Thread thread = new System.Threading.Thread(
    new System.Threading.ThreadStart(
        delegate()
        {
            Console.Beep();
        }
    ));

thread.Start();
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I may be missing something, but why not use:

System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();

This will play a nicer beep, asynchronously, and doesn't require the code or the overhead of the other proposed solutions.

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I like this one the best because it's short and it works. Thanks. –  miliu Feb 6 '13 at 17:13

You can run Console.Beep in a separate thread.

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