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I have a simple WM7 Page with a TextBox. Futher, I assigned EventToCommand (a RelayCommand<string>) to this TextBox, reacting to the TextChanged event. For testing pourposes I made additional method TextBox_TextChanged in the page's code behind. Both the command and TextBox_TextChanged print a message box with the textbox content.

Initial value of the TextBox is "ABC". Then I press D and:

  1. TextBox_TextChanged prints ABCD.
  2. The command prints ABC. D is missing.

Why is the command so fast?

Command declaration:

public RelayCommand<string> TextChanged {get; private set;}

Command initialization:

TextChanged = new RelayCommand<string>((s) => MessageBox.Show(s));

Command binding:

<TextBox x:Name="SearchTextBox" Margin="10,0" TextWrapping="Wrap" Text="{Binding SearchString, Mode=TwoWay}" FontStyle="Italic" TextChanged="SearchTextBox_TextChanged" >
    <i:Interaction.Triggers>
        <i:EventTrigger EventName="TextChanged">
            <GalaSoft_MvvmLight_Command:EventToCommand Command="{Binding TextChanged, Mode=OneWay}" CommandParameter="{Binding Text, ElementName=SearchTextBox}"/>
        </i:EventTrigger>
    </i:Interaction.Triggers>
</TextBox>
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Can you post your code? It is difficult to know for sure without seeing how it is all hooked up together. –  Oded May 2 '10 at 10:08
    
is there a question here? –  Sky Sanders May 2 '10 at 10:27
    
By WM7 do you mean Windows Phone 7? –  Igor Zevaka May 2 '10 at 10:54
    
add mvvm-light tag for galasoft mvvm-light support :) –  CodeWeasel May 4 '10 at 8:33
    
@Sky - Yes, he wants to know why two delegates responding to the same event produce different results. It appears that the command is running before the binding occurs when there is an event handler attached. –  SergioL Apr 13 '11 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

I can't reproduce this behaviour. I have tried using EventToCommand and a Behaviour(which simply listens to TextChanged event).

Without seeing the code I suspect this might be to do with how you get the text of the search box or a logic error elsewhere.

This is a snippet of how I use EventToCommand:

<TextBox Name="SearchTextBox">
  <i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="TextChanged">
      <cmd:EventToCommand Command="{Binding TestTextChangedCommand,Mode=OneWay}" CommandParameter="{Binding Path=Text, ElementName=SearchTextBox}"/>
    </i:EventTrigger>
  <i:Interaction.Triggers>
</TextBox>

In the viewmodel

m_TestTextChangedCommand = new RelayCommand<string>(val => System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(val));

As you can see I used a commandparameter to pass the value of the textbox to the viewmodel. This way the viewmodel doesn't have to know about the textbox to get the text value.

An alternative to this approach would be to use behaviours and TwoWay binding to update a property:

<TextBox Name="SearchTextBox" Text="{Binding TextInViewModel, Mode=TwoWay}" >
  <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
    <sc:UpdateOnTextChangedBehavior/>
  </i:Interaction.Behaviors>
</TextBox>

UpdateOnTextChangedBehavior class:

    public class UpdateOnTextChangedBehavior : Behavior<TextBox>
    {
        protected override void OnAttached()
        {
            base.OnAttached();

            this.AssociatedObject.TextChanged += 
                new TextChangedEventHandler(AssociatedObject_TextChanged);
        }

        void AssociatedObject_TextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(((TextBox)sender).Text);
            BindingExpression binding = 
                this.AssociatedObject.GetBindingExpression(TextBox.TextProperty);
            if (binding != null)
            {
                binding.UpdateSource();
            }
        }

        protected override void OnDetaching()
        {
            base.OnDetaching();

            this.AssociatedObject.TextChanged -= 
                new TextChangedEventHandler(AssociatedObject_TextChanged);
        }
    }

What the above does is mimick the behaviour of desktop WPF Binding with UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, which is missing in Silverlight. So what will happen, whenever you type into the text box TextInViewModel property will get updated. This property doesn't haven to be a DependencyProperty, it could just be a normal CLR property.

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Thank you! It works like a charm, it helped me a lot –  J4N Nov 28 '11 at 14:19

This works with TextBox via parameter for RelayCommand. IOW - RelayCommand<TextBox>

    <TextBox Height="72" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="8,136,0,0" Name="txtFilter" Text="" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="460" >
        <interactivity:Interaction.Triggers>
            <interactivity:EventTrigger EventName="TextChanged">
                <cmd:EventToCommand Command="{Binding SearchedTextChanged}" CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=txtFilter}" />
            </interactivity:EventTrigger>
        </interactivity:Interaction.Triggers>
    </TextBox>

public RelayCommand<TextBox> SearchedTextChanged { get; set; }

SearchedTextChanged = new RelayCommand<TextBox>(OnSearchedTextChanged);

private void OnSearchedTextChanged(TextBox val)
    {
        if (val != null)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(val.Text);
        }
    }
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I had a similar issue and found that the databinding operation does not always fire until the TextBox loses focus. However, the Command will fire immediately.

If you want to guarantee that the databinding has occurred before you use the value, you can call the BindingExpression.UpdateSource() method on your control. Try something like this:

var bindTarget = SearchTextBox.GetBindingExpression(TextBox.TextProperty);
bindTarget.UpdateSource();

To avoid referring to your TextBox directly in your ViewModel (as you should with MVVM), you can use FocusManager.GetFocusedElement(). This is particularly useful when dealing with ApplicationBar buttons as they don't seem to receive focus when used.

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Some code I sued (similar to yours Command example):

Command declaration:

    public RelayCommand<string> TextChanged {get; private set;}

Command initialization:

TextChanged = new RelayCommand<string>((s) => MessageBox.Show(s));

Command binding:

<TextBox x:Name="SearchTextBox" Margin="10,0" TextWrapping="Wrap" Text="{Binding SearchString, Mode=TwoWay}" FontStyle="Italic" TextChanged="SearchTextBox_TextChanged" >
<i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="TextChanged">
        <GalaSoft_MvvmLight_Command:EventToCommand Command="{Binding TextChanged, Mode=OneWay}" CommandParameter="{Binding Text, ElementName=SearchTextBox}"/>
    </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>

For some reasons messagebox shows a string with one character delay.

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Welcome to stackOverflow! Note that you shouldn't post replies as answers here, either use comments or edit the original post, answers don't have any order. –  Simon Buchan May 3 '10 at 9:40

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