Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am a C programmer, but had learnt C++ @school longtime back. Now I am trying to write code in C++ but getting compiler error. Please check and tell me whats wrong with my code.

typedef class _filter_session
{
private:
    static int session_count;  /* Number of sessions count -- Static */    
public:
    _filter_session();         /* Constructor */
    ~_filter_session();        /* Destructor */
}FILTER_SESSION;


_filter_session::_filter_session(void)
{
    (this->session_count)++;
    return;
}


_filter_session::~_filter_session(void)
{
    (this->session_count)--;
    return;
}

The error that I am getting is

"error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "private: static int _filter_session::session_count" (?session_count@_filter_session@@0HA)"

I am using Visual Studio 2005 by the way.

Plz plz help me.

Regards,

Microkernel

share|improve this question
    
All I want is to keep the count of number of active sessions... How do I do it then? if its globally accessible, anyone outside the class can access and change the variable!!! –  Microkernel May 2 '10 at 11:55
6  
Global names starting with a _ are reserved. You are writing code that exhibits undefined behavior. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 2 '10 at 12:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

static variables need to be defined outside of the class body somewhere. The declaration inside the class body is just a declaration.

E.g. at global scope:

int _filter_session::session_count;

You need to ensure that this definition occurs only once in the program so usually you would place it in a source file (.cc or .cpp) and not a header file which is included in more than once translation unit.

For portability you should avoid class names that start with an _. There is also little need to typedef your class name. class Name { //... introduces a type name in C++, you wouldn't have to use class Name to refer to the type.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this has do be done in exactly on compilation unit, or am I mixing things up here. Doing this in a header would most likely result in multiply defined symbols. –  Björn Pollex May 2 '10 at 11:55
    
Yes, it need to satisfy the ODR and be defined only once in the program, but as the constructor and destructor are also defined 'out of line' in the same block of code I was guessing that this wasn't a header or must only be included once anyway. –  Charles Bailey May 2 '10 at 11:57
    
Yes, the fucntions are in a separate C++ file. Thanks for pointing out, had not thought abt it ;) –  Microkernel May 2 '10 at 12:02

Not to do with your problem, but in C++ there is no need to typedef classes and structs like this:

typedef class _filter_session
{
  ...
}FILTER_SESSION;

You can and should simply say:

class filter_session
{
  ...
};

Also, c;lass names should not normally be in uppercase, as people will confuse them with macros. and you rarely need to use the this-> construct - your code certainly does not.

share|improve this answer

You need to initialize the static variable. This code actually compiles:

typedef class _filter_session
{
private:
    static int session_count;  /* Number of sessions count -- Static */    
public:
    _filter_session();         /* Constructor */
    ~_filter_session();        /* Destructor */
}; // FILTER_SESSION;

int _filter_session::session_count = 0;


_filter_session::_filter_session(void)
{
    session_count++;
    return;
}


_filter_session::~_filter_session(void)
{
    session_count--;
    return;
}

int main(int argc, const char **argv)
{
  return 0;
}

Note, I commented FILTER_SESSION to compile on g++/Linux, and also added a main and removed the this-> (as another member mentions, the variable is not a property of the object, but of the class. Think it as a namespaced global variable)

share|improve this answer
    
So is that static variable accessible by non-member functions. If so, how to make sure that session_count holds number of active sessions? Thanks for the reply :) –  Microkernel May 2 '10 at 11:59
    
No, it won't be accessible because it is declared private. The fact that you can initialize it that way does not mean you have access to it outside of the class. –  duncan May 2 '10 at 12:12

Just use session_count++. A static variable is not tied to any instance of a class, and hence it cannot be accessed through the this-pointer. All instances of your class share one instance of session_count. In fact, session_count can be accessed even if no instances of your class exist.

Edit Ok, my answer does not solve the problem, but Charles Bailey`s does.

share|improve this answer
    
All I want is to keep the count of number of active sessions... How do I do it then? if its globally accessible, anyone outside the class can access and change the variable!!! –  Microkernel May 2 '10 at 11:55
    
@Microkernel: You've missed Space_C0wb0y's point. Inside the class session_count resolves to _filter_session::session_count anyway. Because it's a static variable this->session_count, _filter_session::session_count and session_count all refer to the same object. It wasn't suggested that you make the variable global. –  Charles Bailey May 2 '10 at 11:59
    
The variable is still encapsulated within the class. –  Puppy May 2 '10 at 12:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.