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How can I check if a string (NSString) contains another smaller string?

I was hoping for something like:

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
NSLog(@"%d",[string containsSubstring:@"hello"]);

But the closest I could find was:

if ([string rangeOfString:@"hello"] == 0) {
    NSLog(@"sub string doesnt exist");
} 
else {
    NSLog(@"exists");
}

Anyway, is that the best way to find if a string contains another string?

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1  
I'd like to see it added as well, but in the meantime it's relatively easy to add it as a category on NSString. –  isaac Jan 11 '13 at 1:48
1  
Using if ([string rangeOfString:@"hello"] == 0) {...} there's a type mismatch error for NSRange and int. to fix that, you should change the line to the following: if ([string rangeOfString:@"hello"].length == 0) {...} –  Neeku Nov 11 '13 at 16:14
    
iOS 8 adds containsString: and here is a minimally invasive way to add iOS 7 support petersteinberger.com/blog/2014/… –  Steve Moser Aug 6 at 3:18

9 Answers 9

up vote 1475 down vote accepted
NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
if ([string rangeOfString:@"bla"].location == NSNotFound) {
  NSLog(@"string does not contain bla");
} else {
  NSLog(@"string contains bla!");
}

The key is noticing that rangeOfString: returns an NSRange struct, and the documentation says that it returns the struct {NSNotFound, 0} if the "haystack" does not contain the "needle".


And if you're on iOS 8 or OS X Yosemite, you can now do:

NSString *string = @"hello bla blah";
if ([string containsString:@"bla"]) {
  NSLog(@"string contains bla!");
} else {
  NSLog(@"string does not contain bla");
}

👍

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162  
To make a case insensitive search use "if ([string rangeOfString:@"bla" options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].location != NSNotFound)" –  Vanja Mar 28 '12 at 7:28
2  
NSHipster has a great in depth article about NSRange - nshipster.com/nsrange –  leviathan Jan 13 at 17:42
    
@Dave DeLong I was just going to mention a Category that I created for this purpose before I read your edit to the answer! Since I am primarily a c# developer I am glad that they added a contains method to NSSTring. –  dherrin79 Sep 5 at 14:11
3  
Thanks for the iOS 8 update ;) –  renfei Sep 11 at 8:14
    
the NSLogs should be inverted in the ios8 update answer –  leukosaima Sep 19 at 17:32

Make a category on NSString:

@interface NSString ( containsCategory )
- (BOOL) containsString: (NSString*) substring;
@end

// - - - - 

@implementation NSString ( containsCategory )

- (BOOL) containsString: (NSString*) substring
{    
    NSRange range = [self rangeOfString : substring];
    BOOL found = ( range.location != NSNotFound );
    return found;
}

@end
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12  
+1 for clearer resulting code and reusability. I turned it into the one liner return [self rangeOfString:substring].location != NSNotFound; and included it in my refactoring library, es_ios_utils. github.com/peterdeweese/es_ios_utils –  Peter DeWeese Jul 21 '11 at 15:21
11  
There is actually a good reason I kept it as three lines; my brain can process it effortlessly. But if it is condensed then an amount of head scratching ( albeit in this case minute ) is required. +1 back for open sourcing your library. –  P i Jul 21 '11 at 15:53
NSString *myString = @"hello bla bla";
NSRange rangeValue = [myString rangeOfString:@"hello" options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch];

if (rangeValue.length > 0){

NSLog(@"string contains hello");

} 

else {

NSLog(@"string does not contain hello!");

}

//You can alternatively use following too :

if (rangeValue.location == NSNotFound) {

NSLog(@"string does not contain hello");

} 

else {

NSLog(@"string contains hello!");

}
share|improve this answer

Since this seems to be a high-ranking result in Google, I want to add this:

iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 add the containsString: method to NSString. An updated version of Dave DeLong's example for those systems:

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
if ([string containsString:@"bla"]) {
    NSLog(@"string contains bla!");
} else {
    NSLog(@"string does not contain bla");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Here is a minimally invasive way to add it to iOS 7 and below: petersteinberger.com/blog/2014/… –  Steve Moser Aug 6 at 3:20

With iOS 8 and Swift, we can use localizedCaseInsensitiveContainsString method

 let string: NSString = "Café"
 let substring: NSString = "É"

 string.localizedCaseInsensitiveContainsString(substring) // true
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1  
This is good. No idea why they didn't have this method for ios 7 –  Lucas Jul 2 at 15:02

An improved version of P i's solution, a category on NSString, that not only will tell, if a string is found within another string, but also takes a range by reference, is:

@interface NSString (Contains)
-(BOOL)containsString: (NSString*)substring
              atRange:(NSRange*)range;

-(BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring;
@end

@implementation NSString (Contains)

-(BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring
              atRange:(NSRange *)range{

    NSRange r = [self rangeOfString : substring];
    BOOL found = ( r.location != NSNotFound );
    if (range != NULL) *range = r;
    return found;
}

-(BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring
{
    return [self containsString:substring
                        atRange:NULL];
}

@end

Use it like:

NSString *string = @"Hello, World!";

//If you only want to ensure a string contains a certain substring
if ([string containsString:@"ello" atRange:NULL]) {
    NSLog(@"YES");
}

// Or simply
if ([string containsString:@"ello"]) {
    NSLog(@"YES");
}

//If you also want to know substring's range
NSRange range;
if ([string containsString:@"ello" atRange:&range]) {
    NSLog(@"%@", NSStringFromRange(range));
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a copy-and-paste function snippet:

-(BOOL)Contains:(NSString *)StrSearchTerm on:(NSString *)StrText
{
    return [StrText rangeOfString:StrSearchTerm 
        options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].location != NSNotFound;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
why not use ...location != NSNotFound instead of complicating the code? –  Josh Jun 19 at 3:17
    
We could use like that also.Good thinking –  Duraiamuthan.H Jun 19 at 5:00
1  
Appreciate the effort in a copy/paste snippet. Would be good to follow Apple's style guidelines. –  funroll Sep 9 at 17:35

Oneliner (Smaller amount of code. DRY, as you have only one NSLog):

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
NSLog(@"String %@", ([string rangeOfString:@"bla"].location == NSNotFound) ? @"not found" : @"cotains bla"); 
share|improve this answer
3  
How does this differ and improve on earlier answers? –  Mark Sep 11 '13 at 10:25

Since you are searching the best way, here it is:

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
if ([string rangeOfString:@"bla"].length > 0) {
NSLog(@"string contains bla");
} else {
NSLog(@"string does not contain bla!");
}

In this case you know that string is "hello bla bla". But if string may also be nil, you have a problem with checking against location. Because on nil string the location is 0 and you fail checking != NSNotFound. So take .length > 0 is a more safe way.

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protected by Mark Sep 11 '13 at 10:26

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