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I have a bunch of strings which may of may not have random symbols and numbers in them. Some examples are:

contains(reserved[j])){

close();

i++){

letters[20]=word

I want to find any character that is NOT a letter, and replace it with a white space, so the above examples look like:

contains reserved j

close

i

letters word

What is the best way to do this?

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Can you specify what you mean by a letter? Should it be based on the current locale of the computer or from a fixed list of characters which you have predetermined to be letters that you are interested in? Should it include accented characters? Should it include characters from the Russian or Greek alphabets? –  Mark Byers May 2 '10 at 19:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends what you mean by "not a letter", but assuming you mean that letters are a-z or A-Z then try this:

s = s.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z]", " ");

If you want to collapse multiple symbols into a single space then add a plus at the end of the regular expression.

s = s.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z]+", " ");
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+1 for the collapse recommendation. –  BalusC May 2 '10 at 19:46
yourInputString = yourInputString.replaceAll("[^\\p{Alpha}]", " ");

^ denotes "all characters except"

\p{Alpha} denotes all alphabetic characters

See http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/regex/Pattern.html for details

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3  
Actually, he want to get rid of numbers/digits as well. The \p{Alnum} would cover them as well. –  BalusC May 2 '10 at 19:04
    
Thank you. I updated the reply. –  aioobe May 2 '10 at 19:55

I want to find any character that is NOT a letter

That will be [^\p{Alpha}]+. The [] indicate a group. The \p{Alpha} matches any alphabetic character (both uppercase and lowercase, it does basically the same as \p{Upper}\p{Lower} and a-zA-Z. The ^ inside group inverses the matches. The + indicates one-or-many matches in sequence.

and replace it with a white space

That will be " ".

Summarized:

string = string.replaceAll("[^\\p{Alpha}]+", " ");

Also see the java.util.regex.Pattern javadoc for a concise overview of available patterns. You can learn more about regexs at the great site http://regular-expression.info.

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Use the regexp /[^a-zA-Z]/ which means, everything that is not in the a-z/A-Z characters

In ruby I would do:

"contains(reserved[j]))".gsub(/[^a-zA-Z]/, " ")
 => "contains reserved j   "

In Java should be something like:

import java.util.regex.*;
...

String inputStr = "contains(reserved[j])){";
String patternStr = "[^a-zA-Z]";
String replacementStr = " ";

// Compile regular expression
Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(patternStr);

// Replace all occurrences of pattern in input
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(inputStr);
String output = matcher.replaceAll(replacementStr);
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