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How can i loop thru a stl::List and store the value of one of the objects for use later in the function?

Particle *closestParticle;
for(list<Particle>::iterator p1 = mParticles.begin(); p1 != mParticles.end(); ++p1 )
     {
      // Extra stuff removed
            closestParticle = p1; // fails to compile (edit from comments)
     }
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Are you trying to say this code doesn't compile? // fails usually indicates you mean a run-time error. –  rlbond May 2 '10 at 19:26
    
@rlbond: I agree that // fails to compile would be better (although in this example I assumed that the compiler error wasn't an unwanted side-effect of pasting the code), but I'd disagree that // fails "usually implies run-time error". –  sbi May 2 '10 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Either

Particle *closestParticle;
for(list<Particle>::iterator it=mParticles.begin(); it!=mParticles.end(); ++it)
    {
      // Extra stuff removed
            closestParticle = &*it;
    }

or

list<Particle>::iterator closestParticle;
for(list<Particle>::iterator it=mParticles.begin(); it!=mParticles.end(); ++it )
    {
      // Extra stuff removed
            closestParticle = it;
    }

or

inline list<Particle>::iterator findClosestParticle(list<Particle>& pl)
{
    for(list<Particle>::iterator it=pl.begin(); it!=pl.end(); ++it )
        {
          // Extra stuff removed
               return it;
        }
    return pl.end();
}

or

template< typename It > 
inline It findClosestParticle(It begin, It end)
{
    while(begin != end )
        {
          // Extra stuff removed
               return begin;
          ++begin;
        }
    return end;
}

These are sorted in increasing personal preference. :)

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4  
Scrolling down that was actually an enjoyable experience. +1 –  Potatoswatter May 2 '10 at 19:31
    
closestParticle = &*it // Did the trick! Could you make what it's doing more verbose, i'm reading it as: Go to the address of the pointer to the iterator 'it'? –  Onedayitwillmake May 2 '10 at 19:48
3  
Nice catch. I'd personally pick #2 as my flavor of choice. And I'm a little confused with #3 and #4. It seems like you're returning prematurely. –  rlbond May 2 '10 at 19:49
    
@rlbond, rbegin() ! –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 2 '10 at 19:52
3  
@Onedayitwillmake: *it derferences the iterator and returns a reference to the object. The & then takes the address of that object. Does this explain it well enough or should one of us go into more detail? –  sbi May 2 '10 at 19:55

For a list, the only way to invalidate an iterator is to erase it. So I suspect you're calling list.erase(p1) at some point in the loop. You need to make a copy of the iterator, move p1 back one, and then erase the copy.

EDIT: Oh wait, did you mean it doesn't compile? If so, see @sbi's answer. But you really need to word your question in a good way. What is your compile error? Or does it fail at run-time? In this case, however, I believe you mean a compile error.

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I'm not sure you answered to the right question. Did I miss anything? –  sbi May 2 '10 at 19:24
    
I meant compiler error, my mistake I was unaware of the conventions :) - This one did the trick: closestParticle = &*it; // So it's saying? // Go to the address of the the pointer at it? –  Onedayitwillmake May 2 '10 at 19:46

I'm not an expert on the STL, but I believe the reason it fails to compile is because an iterator is an object that points to another object. In other words, an iterator is a generalization of a pointer. So to do what you'd want with minimal changes to your code, you would first need to de-reference the iterator to get at the value it contains. You'd then use the '&' to get its address and would then assign that address to your pointer variable. This is why ptr=&*it; works.

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