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The output is always a String, for example H,E,L,L,O,. How could I limit the commas? I want the commas only between letters, for example H,E,L,L,O.

import java.util.Scanner;

import java.lang.String;

public class forLoop 

{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Scanner Scan = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.print("Enter a string: ");
        String Str1 = Scan.next();

       String newString="";
       String Str2 ="";
        for (int i=0; i < Str1.length(); i++)
        {
                newString = Str1.charAt(i) + ",";

                Str2 = Str2 + newString;  

        }
       System.out.print(Str2);

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What exactly are you wanting this to do? –  Josh Patton May 2 '10 at 21:13
5  
Once again, try to adhere the Sun Java Naming Conventions as much as possible if you don't want to lose points. Variable identifiers ought to start with lowercase. Scan and Str2 are invalid. Also, classnames ought to start with uppercase. forLoop is invalid. –  BalusC May 2 '10 at 21:18
2  
Using the standard naming conventions is good practice, sure, but you can't necessarily say the poster is going to lose points on the assignment for not following them. That's entirely up to the grader and the specifications of the assignment. (And I would call it unconventional and discouraged, but not invalid) –  David Z May 2 '10 at 22:01
    
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2753313/… –  polygenelubricants May 2 '10 at 22:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The easiest way I see is :

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner Scan = new Scanner(System.in);

    System.out.print("Enter a string: ");
    String Str1 = Scan.nextLine();

   String newString="";
   String Str2 ="";
    for (int i=0; i < Str1.length()-1; i++)
    {
            newString = Str1.charAt(i) + ",";

            Str2 = Str2 + newString;

    }
   Str2 = Str2 + Str1.charAt(Str1.length()-1);
   System.out.println(Str2);
}

The output it will give is :

run:
Enter a string: Hello world
H,e,l,l,o, ,w,o,r,l,d
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 5 seconds)

Though I will highly recommend learning regular expression as suggested by @Roman. Till then this will do the trick. :)

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Since this is homework I'll help you out a little without giving the answer:

If you want the output to only be inbetween letters IE: A,B,C instead of A,B,C, which is what I imagine you are asking about. Then you need to look at your for loop and check the boundary conditions.

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if i changed the loop to Str1.length()-1,,, it will give me A,B, excluding the C... –  WM. May 2 '10 at 21:16
    
What I mean is check the condition at which you append a comma –  Woot4Moo May 2 '10 at 21:17
1  
Try using an if statement inside your loop. –  Amber May 2 '10 at 21:17
    
or just change your output when you get out of the loop (you know it always ends in a comma, so....) –  Miles May 3 '10 at 1:01

Try regular expressions:

String input = scanner.next();
String output = input.replaceAll(".", "$0,");

With spaces it would be a bit easier since you don't need to abandon last 'odd' comma:

output = output.substring (0, ouput.length() - 2);
share|improve this answer
    
far too complex for a CS101 course problem. –  Woot4Moo May 2 '10 at 21:18
1  
maybe, but it's not wrong. –  Roman May 2 '10 at 21:20
1  
pedants are so pedantic.. –  Roman May 2 '10 at 21:24
1  
It's not pedantry if the answer is unnecessarily complex, more confusing and less useful to the asker. –  Paul May 2 '10 at 21:28
1  
I can only suppose that none of you both know this solution. Anyway, let it be here just for the sake of some variety in answers. –  Roman May 2 '10 at 21:34

When you've figured out the loop-solution, you could try the following ;)

System.out.println(Arrays.toString("HELLO".toCharArray()).replaceAll("[\\[ \\]]", ""));
share|improve this answer
    
If you're doing replaceAll, might as well do it without the Arrays.toString/toCharArray: stackoverflow.com/questions/2753313/… –  polygenelubricants May 2 '10 at 22:52
    
Nice! ......... –  aioobe May 3 '10 at 13:35

Just don't append the comma when the last item of the loop is to be appended. You have the item index by i and the string length by Str2.length(). Just do the primary school math with a lesser-than or a greater-than operator in an if statement.

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The following snippet should be instructive. It shows:

  • How to use StringBuilder for building strings
  • How to process each char in a String using an explicit index
    • How to detect if it's the first/last iteration for special processing

    String s = "HELLO";
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        char ch = s.charAt(i);
        if (i == 0) { // first
            sb.append("(" + ch + ")");
        } else if (i == s.length() - 1) { // last
            sb.append("<" + ch + ">");
        } else { // everything in between
            sb.append(Character.toLowerCase(ch));
        }
    }
    System.out.println(sb.toString());
    // prints "(H)ell<O>"
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